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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
My 2 6V Optimas were not a matched pair but the new ones will be. Size was important to replace the original battery and to give the option of 6 or 12 volts. I have had good luck with the 12V Optimas in my '39 Ford and '64 Chevy pickup, both are much older than the 2 6Vs. I think the age and outside temperature with the engine heat and the placement of the batteries finally got to these batteries. I'm going to try a heat shield with the new ones.

With all the tools I have, I can't believe I didn't own a battery load tester. In addition to load testing the condition of the battery, it can be used to determine an estimate of cold cranking amps, read the voltage and determine alternator/generator output. Handy with a price of only $20 to $40.

Posted on: 8/7 5:56:52
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
I was out with one of my final test drives, everything was good until I pulled up to my shop gate, shut the car off to open the gate and when I went to re-start, nothing happened.

I dragged the car back into the shop and checked the battery, the voltage was good and I had no trouble starting the car earlier that morning several times so I immediately blamed the Chinese 12 volt solenoid that has previously given me trouble. Went to NAPA and bought a Ford 12 volt solenoid, pulled the starter and modified the solenoid to fit. Bench-tested the starter and re-installed. Ouch! Still no start! All indications are now that there was a sudden failure of one or both of the 6 volt Optima batteries. I'm kicking myself for not having by jumper box charged before deciding to remove the starter! I had no way of load testing the batteries and they are a real chore to remove to be tested. So I grabbed a 20% off coupon and headed to Harbor Freight to buy a 100 amp battery load tester. Total cost, $16 plus tax. Tested the batteries in the car at 12V and sure enough there was a problem. Removed the batteries and tested each at 6V and one was totally dead and the other was marginal. One was bought in 2015 and the other in 2016. Ordered a new pair of 5 volt Optimas for $375 and waiting for them to be delivered. Lesson learned, don't jump to conclusions, check all options first and suspect the less obvious!

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Posted on: 8/6 9:00:42
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
Took the Packard out early this week with 95 degree heat and the AC on full blast. Ran fine, didn't overheat but ran warmer than I would like, about 200 (new gauge has numbers). Decided to go with Plan B, adding the mechanical fan back on the water pump. The problem was that with the single belt arrangement with the compressor on the left, the fan in the original position hit the clutch of the compressor. I had planned to build a spacer, if necessary, to move the fan toward the radiator about 7/16". On most cars this would be pretty simple, drill 4 holes in a spacer and bolt it on. Not so with Packard, it has a lip on water pump bracket that centers the fan. This makes a spacer much more difficult to build.

I started by buying a $6 piece of 5/8" thick aluminum billet. First used a hole saw with the correct inside diameter to cut the relief that will center the fan on the front of the adapter. Then used another hole saw to cut into the back of the spacer for the hole to center the back of the spacer on the water pump. Then used a 2 3/4" hole saw to get the round 2 1/2" round disk. Used a drill press for this.I have a small lathe but it is not powerful enough the carve out the excess material to finish the spacer. I used a 1/2" end mill in a drill press with a clamp to carve out the excess material. Not as pretty as using a lathe but equally effective. Drilled the 4 mounting holes and it is ready to mount. Would have been much easier with a lathe, but still possible with some available tools!

Now the hardest part, getting the assembly mounted with little room!

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Posted on: 8/1 10:41:53
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
How's the repair of the roof going? Did I miss it?

Posted on: 8/1 10:26:25
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Re: Various CL Pickings
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197

Posted on: 7/28 8:17:39
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Re: 50 Deluxe horn
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
Try cleaning the points, worked for me.

Posted on: 7/20 7:00:09
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
As usual, Howard's sharp eye caught how my horn switch had been haywired. I didn't know the difference from someone's earlier handiwork. Will be corrected!

Posted on: 7/16 10:55:56
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
Dallas,

The front section is one piece. I made a pattern and cut a crescent-shaped hole to go over the hump. Very similar to some of the factory carpets. Took some work to get the cutout just right.

Joe

Posted on: 7/16 8:19:37
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
Howard,

Because I have learned never to doubt you, I pulled it back apart to check the ground contacts. The diagram is not real clear. I swear that's how I assembled it before and I had a working horn!

Joe

Posted on: 7/15 11:35:45
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Re: Joe's '49 Club Sedan
Home away from home
Joined:
2013/5/23 12:44
From Tampa Bay, Florida
Posts: 197
I had to remove the steering wheel to be able to work on the dash re-wiring. When I took it apart, I put all the many parts in a plastic bag and put it aside. I've put this back together several times, but it never fails that I have to stare at all the parts to try to figure out how it goes back together. Might even have to check a diagram Howard sent me a long time ago! It came back to me and I got all the insulators and the disk on the horn wire in the right place and the horn ring assembled.


The biggest trick in re-assembly is getting the horn wire all the way down the steering shaft and out at the bottom of the steering box. Trying to push the wire down the shaft is like trying to push a snake up hill by the tail. The opening in the shaft narrows at the steering box and it seems no matter how hard you try, the horn wire will not go past that point. I've found that the easiest way to get the wire installed is to run something from the bottom up to and out of the steering wheel. I used a piece of safety wire, the stuff that is used to secure critical nuts and bolts from coming loose. It is very thin and very strong. It slides right up the column. Attached a piece of nylon cord to the wire and pulled the cord down the shaft. Attached the end of the horn wire to the cord and pulled the cord and wire down the shaft and out the steering box. There is no connector on the end of the horn wire, it was removed before disassembly. A new connector will be added to connect to the horn relay wire. The last 6 inches of the assembly gets tricky as the horn ring spring needs to be lined up with the horn ring and the steering wheel as the last part of the cable is pulled, easier with 2 people. The 3 screws then attach the ring plate to the steering wheel and the plastic cover is attached.


There needs to be something between the steering wheel and the plastic cover, I used a piece of 1 1/2" thick foam cut in a 3" circle. What Packard originally used had turned into a glob of goop!


Now need to install the interior windshield trim and the front seat and the car will be ready to drive.

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Posted on: 7/15 7:58:48
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