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Re: Corona
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2009/1/24 9:59
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Quote:

Tim Cole wrote:
I disagree. "Monsters on Maple Street" was a ripoff of The Crucible and a play on McCarthyism. If Sirling wrote a parable on influenza there would have been panic buying of cigarettes.

The correct way to refer to this corona thing is SARS Corona. The last SARS was killing both doctors, nurses, and patients so this thing is very serious.

My employer has begun shutting down. The reality is that, without initial containment to kill off the disease, everybody will eventually get this illness. The present government action is serving only to slow the spread and potential mutation to plague like manifestation. As well as a collapse of for profit medical care. Thus, ignore safety at your own peril.


Disagreement is the stock and trade of forums–or at minimum, a by-product. And whether or not "The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street" (the actual title) is or isn't a ripoff of anything (and I don't believe it is) this was not the question posted in this forum. The original statement was to the effect of why didn't "Rod Sirling" (the man's name was Serling... as in S-e-r-l-i-n-g, not "Sirling") write about it. And... we could go further by invoking the names of both Philip K. Dick and Richard Matheson... but I won't.

As to whether "Monsters" was a reference to McCarthyism or not... this can be debated forever. Some people said it was aimed at communism and other political movements. Some said it was about race. Others said it was about foreigners in the USA. Everybody has an analysis and an angle. BUT... the most obvious point the story made was how stupidity, panic, suspicions, hysteria, fear of anyone different, fear of the unknown and mob mentality can snowball very quickly into a nightmare that may not be stopped. If you saw the episode, perhaps you will recall the space aliens on the hilltop above the town at the end, watching the people on Maple Street riot and kill one another. The one alien turns to the other and says something to the effect of "You see how the process works? We'll just go from one planet to the other and let them destroy themselves..."

We could also go through a litany of related Twilight Zone titles, but this would likely just present more opportunity for dispute... which I personally detest. So that's all I have to say.

As for what the present virus spread is or isn't, having once been married to both an MD and an RN, I'll take what they say as a guide, if I need one. But yes, ignoring precautions with this or any virus is done at one's own peril.

Posted on: 3/22 6:57:39
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Re: Corona
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Posts: 631
Quote:

Tim Cole wrote:
I wonder why Rod Sirling missed this one. People running around buying toilet paper as if it were water in the desert.

The fundamentals of the stock market are where they were in 1929 so I was expecting a crash.

It will take a long time for consumer staples to get back to normal, but there will be an inflationary spike that will prove permanent. The economists will deny it because they are crooks not scholars. The politicians will say America is greater than ever amid the collapse. In the mean time consumer goods production will not increase because that makes no economic sense.

This toilet paper and bread hoarding makes no sense. Just like the stock market.


Rod Serling–who I once met– didn't miss this one at all. In fact, several Twilight Zone episodes nailed it. But the one most appropriate in this case was entitled, "The Monsters Are Due On Maple Street"...

Posted on: 3/21 10:11:18
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Re: Packard Bikes
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PACKARD BICYCLE FRONT SPRING SUSPENSION>>>>> If you read this 1936 bicycle accessory advertisement, a company in Cincinnati was selling a bicycle front suspension attachment they called "Packard Knee Action." Bicycle hobbyists today (even the ones who think they are "historians" or TV stars) are too young to remember, but up until the end of the 1960s, bicycle suspensions–like cars– were termed "knee-action." Thus the wording of this ad.

For whatever reason, a whole new generation of younger folks in the 1970s took to calling knee-action front suspensions, "springers"–wherever this came from. As in, "aw... that Schwinn Phantom bicycle ... or that Harley's got a springer fork." So from then on, the knee-action terminology died and was replaced in the general jargon by the term, "springer." (people today tend to just make up terms to mean whatever THEY want, irregardless of established terminology that existed previously... all of which is how "restored" now means a flashy paint job and blinding chrome instead of "returned to original"... and "all original" means whatever the person saying it chooses!).

Anyway, the add-on gadget in this ad claims it would work on any bicycle but this is hard to believe since the device moves the front wheel inches forward and has no stops to prevent contact with a bicycle fender during upward movement.

Also note that the ad talks about "1936 Packard smoothness"... with obvious hints here mixing Packard automobile and this bicycle suspension. Again, no genuine connection with Packard Motor Car Company, but you can see where they were going with this. Company called itself, "Packard Knee Action Company"

One more of the many times the Packard name was applied to bicycles in the USA in days of old. And the beat goes on...

Attach file:



jpg  PackardBicycleKneeActionWM.jpg (104.33 KB)
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Posted on: 3/13 12:42:01
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Re: Juke box
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Quote:

Guscha wrote:
Quote:
Trademarks have to be registered to very specific types/classes of goods and/or services.

Bicycles and jukeboxes (and pianos) ain't the same (market) as motor vehicles and wiring harnesses (and related components and tools).


Brian (BH), thanks. And don't forget, please, that Packard could be your family name and thus you could name your company after you. Below some few pics of Packard brands.

Quote:
...but most were obviously cheesing off of the prestige of the Packard automobile...

Too narrowly understood and considered. Also before the first Packard car was build, Packard was the name of companies.



images sources
#1, #2, #4 - hippostcard.com
#3 - eBay; item no. 302497941220




Already very well known and already understood–at least by me. See The Packard Cormorant magazine article as I have mentioned several times. If the topic is important enough to debate, the back issue is certainly available.

I have even pointed out in the past places like the Packard Hotel in Havana, Cuba and Packard Motel in Florida and elsewhere.

Already talked about the Packard Piano and Organ Company in Indiana (see Packard Bike postings).

Even talked about Packard cologne (you think GTO cologne in the 1960s was not taking a free ride ride on the rep of the car?) and add-on Packard suspension systems.

Again... MOST (obviously not ALL, but MOST) were riding off of Packard automobile prestige. Some even copied PMCC's logo or used similar logos or similar sales slogans. Like the bicycle company that sneakily talked about a "famous Packard ride"... or the bicycle kickstand maker that used the slogan, "Ask The Boy Who Has One"... there should be no mystery or mitigation/minimizing of what was going on here. If it isn't obvious... even Stevie Wonder could see this.

Posted on: 3/6 20:41:56
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Re: Juke box
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Quote:

HH56 wrote:
I am curious how so many companies could call themselves "Packard" just like they were associated with Packard Motor or Packard Electric companies back in the day. Were there no brand or trademark laws or did Packard somehow give up the rights. With the real Packard still in business it was not like today where so many of the old defunct brand names have been bought up and legally used to sell mostly shoddy Chinese merchandise so how did they get away with it. McDonalds or Apple or whatever other established company you can name today have lawyers coming out of the woodwork if someone even thinks of using anything resembling their name or trademark.


As I have mentioned before, the Packard Club Cormorant magazine featured an article a few years back that covered the various and numerous items made and sold under a "Packard" name. Can't recall the exact issue but it is in the Index of Packard Cormorant back issues and likely can still be ordered. It was also pointed out that these items had no connection to PMCC, but most were obviously cheesing off of the prestige of the Packard automobile

As for specificity of trademarks, this was not the reason that PMCC didn't go after people using the name. Times back then were just not as litigious as today. And knock-offs in most cases were also not as prevalent. To wit... one does not need to be strictly in the bicycle biz to have fleets of lawyers repping Schwinn to descend on anything using that name. Cease & Desist letters are well known in this case.

Posted on: 3/6 8:00:42
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Re: Juke box
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Quote:

Riki wrote:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Art-Deco-Beat ... se-With-Key-/383439958968

Did Packard have anything to do with this


Ahhhhhh. Like Packard bicycles, just another "Packard" branded item that had absolutely nothing to do with Packard Motor Car Company.

"Pla-Mor" juke boxes were made in Indiana by a company that called itself "Packard Manufacturing." They also made very modernistic sound and speaker systems. One of these looked like a flying saucer and hung from ceilings.

Posted on: 3/5 13:53:22
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Re: Gear Head Tuesday (a day late ...) Packard's Predictor
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2009/1/24 9:59
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Quote:

PackardDon wrote:
I never saw if called the Packard Projector before as it was in the Popular Mechanics article!


The Predictor was originally intended to be named "Javelin" which was a name favored by Richard Teague. As AMC fans well know, Dick finally got his chance to use the name years later on a production car. This "Javelin" name actually appeared on the original scale model built at Packard by my late friend, Tom Beaubien and Charlie Flory. This was the model sent to Ghia in Italy in order to build the full-sized Predictor.

However once the Javelin name was selected, it was discovered that both Plymouth and Mercury were planning to use this name on concept cars they were building. So during construction of the Predictor at Ghia, the name "Projector" was momentarily considered and some news media got ahold of this name. Fortunately in the end, "Predictor" was the final name choice. This whole story with photos is in the book, "Creative Industries of Detroit–The Untold Story of Detroit's Secret Concept Car Builder"

The revelation of the interim name, "Projector" has been made numerous times over the years in The Packard Cormorant magazine and elsewhere.

Posted on: 3/3 11:05:02
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Re: Packard Bikes
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2009/1/24 9:59
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Posts: 631
Quote:

Ozstatman wrote:
Sorry Leeedy, couldn't resist posting the photo below. Not a Packard bike, but a bike mounted on a Packard! Photo taken during the NZ Rally 2014.


Well, wellllll! Appears to be an early vintage British BSA (Birmingham Small Arms–they also made guns) lady's model, with Canadian rims and painted to match the Packard. Sweet!

Posted on: 3/2 15:45:55
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Re: Packard Bikes
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Not a Packard bicycle, but Packard AND bicycle... and important history that also needs to be known... and needs to be corrected.

Earle C. Anthony was one of America's greatest innovators, but much of his history remains unknown to the general public and even to Packard fans. He was–among his many enterprises–a member of PMCC Board of Directors, west coast Packard Distributor, founder of KFI radio (which still exists today) along with other radio and television stations, erected the first commercially successful neon sign in America, was a major key in bringing the Brooklyn Dodger baseball team to Los Angeles, mapped many of the early roads in SoCal, Southern Nevada and Utah, and founded one of the predecessor companies to Greyhound Bus Lines. Most histories (including those presently on the internet and even the almighty Wikipedia) are wildly skewed and are often incorrect about ECA and his enterprises.

"E.C."(as he liked to be called) designed and built one of the first cars ever to roll the streets of Los Angeles when he was just a boy. Sadly the car was destroyed on a run down what was once known as Beaudry Hill in what is now Downtown Los Angeles. Mr. Anthony saved the parts and after many years eventually had them reassembled and put the car on display in his Hope Street Packard dealership (the same place where today's histories erroneously claim the first neon was erected).

Histories will tell you this car was built out of wheelchair parts, but it was actually built from buckboard parts, wheelchair parts and bicycle parts (especially the forks, steering mechanism, wheels and tires). Yes, bicycle parts.

Anyway, this photo shows E.C. admiring the reconstructed Anthony Runabout (as it was officially known). The lever in his hand was the original control for the electric motor that powered the car.

When I last saw it, this little car was on display with a very poorly worded description sign at the Petersen Automotive Museum in L.A. For some reason, someone apparently decided to stain the wood very dark in recent years. No idea where the car is today, but it is sadly under-appreciated and its history is little known.

This photo is from one of the largest Earle C. Anthony collections that exists. Perhaps the largest. I began collecting ECA items in the 1960s and got to know several key persons in Earle C. Anthony, Incorporated, including the last two surviving executives in the 1970s.

By the way, Mr. Anthony knew the owners of "Bean Son Company"... the Packard bicycle distributor out of San Francisco mentioned so prominently at the beginning of this thread. Bean Son Company supplied the wheels and tires for the Anthony Runabout car reconstruction. Ask me how I know...

Attach file:



jpg  ECARunaboutAtHopeStWM.jpg (495.68 KB)
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Posted on: 3/2 15:07:57
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Re: Packard Bikes
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Here is yet another Packard brand bicycle... also from 1937. Another of many, many news clippings I saved. So again, this is not merely opinion. And just to show Packard brand bicycles were not all made by one company. Also to point out more internet myths, these bicycles were not all made by the companies people will tell you on DIY web sites online.

This Packard bicycle shown in this ad was made by the H.P.Snyder Company of Little Falls, New York. For those who don't know (and that's mostly everybody in and out of the bicycle world) Snyder was a huge company that made bicycles under several brands. They also had a factory in Michigan City, Indiana.

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jpg  PackardSnyder1937 copyWM.jpg (375.72 KB)
1249_5e3cf349258cb.jpg 1238X700 px

Posted on: 2/6 21:19:22
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