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   All Posts (39SixSedanMan)


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Re: Hemmings Article
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Joined:
2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
Leedy, very well communicated points on History, Snob Appeal and how business is not based on wishes, but reality. Think you should paste that directly into an email to the Hemmings writer.

I am saddened by the direction Hemmings appears to be going under its new leadership. Good writers being let go and perhaps the quality of writing slipping. I hope it retains its legacy value despite its younger generation leadership that doesn't participate in the hobby directly.

That's my concern.

Posted on: 11/25 8:23:07
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Re: Ken's 1937 120 Touring Sedan
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2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
Well done, Ken. Yeah...burnt knuckles are part of the reward.

I too am curious about the use of Evaporust as a 'running treatment' to the internals of a cooling system. I use this stuff all the time on heavy parts as well as delicate speedometer parts, but never for this. Guess it makes sense, but was unaware of whether it could withstand engine temperatures and maintain its rust removal capability.

May consider this after next flush and fill. Keep us posted.

Again, great work.
Pat

Posted on: 11/23 5:56:01
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Re: 47 Speedometer
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2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
By the way, early fall and late spring are the busiest times for my speedometer repairs. Turn around time depends on how many jobs are coming in and the degree of service needed. I try to get the easy jobs turned around and back out as quickly as quality allows.

Fall are the early birds who are just taking their cars off the road and doing repairs. Late spring seems to be the time lots of people remember that they need to get their speedo serviced.

Pat

Posted on: 11/9 10:05:30
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Re: 47 Speedometer
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2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
Happy to take a look at it.
Pat
Bill's Speedometer Shop

Posted on: 11/6 3:24:26
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Re: Sending unit for 1955 Caribbean fuel tank
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2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
PackardDon, thanks for sharing your knowledge. If you would, please add these part references to the Parts Interchange page.

Posted on: 11/3 3:10:15
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Re: 1924 Series 1 Engine Rocker Arms
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Joined:
2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
Karl,
Wunderbar! Das ist sehr klug.

You are really doing things correctly.

mfG,
Pat

Posted on: 10/28 16:18:47
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Re: Remove the Speedometer cable
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Joined:
2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
For what it's worth, none of the original literature from Stewart Warner, King Sealy, AC Delco, Waltham, Autolite, Northeast, Etc. Called for graphite. Factory treatment was always very light Grease and little or none up at the speedometer so that the cable is not pumping grease into the speedometer magnet shaft. When we rebuild cables, we only use light grease. And there are plenty of speedometers that have come in that have had obvious grease pumped in through the cable up into the magnet and odometer area. I'm not saying graphite is bad, I'm just going with what all my literature indicates and which is readily available today. We use Sil glyde, the silicon-based light Grease.
Again, I hope this helps,
Pat

Posted on: 10/25 9:07:36
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Re: Remove the Speedometer cable
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Joined:
2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
I usually recommend light oil on speedometer cables, unless there are plastics involved.

Regarding the magnet shaft oil reserve, this model requires the flat plate on rear to be removed to allow access to the brass plug of the oil reservoir. You can do this by removing the two slotted screws. So long as the faceplate bezel is still attached, the frame will be held in place but don't shake the unit around.

Best practice would be to remove the felt wick once the brass plug is removed. Inspect to see how dirty or if still holding any oil. If still wet, then just add few drops of oil. If dry, clean the felt wick with penetrating oil and feed the reservoir some also while rotating the input. WHen I service units, I do this until clean penetrating oil comes out around the input shaft bushing. I then put clean wick back in and top off with heavier oil.

Hope this helps,
Pat
Packard Owner
Owner, Bill's Speedometer Shop

Posted on: 10/23 10:17:42
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Re: The Duchess Project: 1940 Super 8 Convertible Sedan
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2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
JoeS, regarding OD cable creep: first, could you clarify the situation? You stated when 'out of overdrive the cable creeps toward engagement.' Does this mean that when you have the dash knob pulled out (OD Locked out), the knob begins to move back toward the fully in position (OD allowed/enabled)?

If this is indeed the scenario, then HH is correct, the cable could provide some some resistance. However, if the cable is disconnected at the lock out arm on the OD, it should remain in locked out position and likewise remain in the enabled position when the knob is pushed in.

Inside the OD, the lock out arm moves a cam that pushes the lockout ring into place when you pull the cable. When the cable knob is pushed in, springs internal to the OD push the lock ring back to the 'OD allowed' position. So although, yes there is a spring that pushes in this direction, the flat area of the lock out arm cam should hold it when you want to lock out.

My suggestion is two fold; If you can get under car and disconnect the cable from lock out arm:

1: Check to see how readily the arm pops out of Lock Out position.
2: Check to see whether the adjustment of the cable is correct to achieve full arm travel. If you are not fully moving the lock out arm to a hard stop, the internal cam may be not fully rotated in which case vibration could work it back to the unlocked out (allowed) position.

Hope this helps,
Pat

Posted on: 10/23 10:10:46
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Re: Ken's 1937 120 Touring Sedan
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Joined:
2009/9/30 11:25
From Dayton, OH, USA
Posts: 338
Mission Creep. Sometimes completely necessary as a real time judgement call in the field.
'Unplanned but Necessary' as we say....

Posted on: 9/24 9:42:53
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