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Re: Tire valves
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
The main advantage of higher pressures (especially for radials) is to lighten the steering at low speeds. It does work, and inflating radial tyres to say 42psi does not really cause any harm. Regardless of pressures, some radials are harder riding than traditional bias ply tyres so the ride will feel more uncomfortable - especially in a Packard.

I use Diamondback whitewalls (based on Toyo radials) on my 1941 120 Club Coupe. I run these at about 38psi, in deference to the bonded white sidewalls. That also reduces the steering effort at parking speeds, which is a nice benefit. The ride does not feel noticeably worse, maybe because many road surfaces today are better than in the day....

Posted on: 2019/10/22 1:58
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: A little Packard History from 1945
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Posts: 103
Re: Self Driving Cars

Don't hold your breath for this. Yes, they are coming but nowhere near as fast as some suggest. Legislation allowing semi-autonomous vehicles will first come into force in Europe in 2022. This requires a competent (licensed) person in the vehicle capable of taking control if necessary. Even Teslas will stop if there is no driver input at the controls for a period of time. So they can't operate with the driver asleep, as suggested in some deliberately misleading advertisements (short sellers of Tesla shares!)

It's also becoming obvious that electric vehicles are not a good long term answer to the energy problem. They will very likely be superseded by other fuels (hydrogen cell?) before truly autonomous driving vehicles become legal.

The change to unleaded fuel was expected to be the death knell for historic (vintage) racing, but it hasn't happened. Avgas is still readily available.

Yes, it's all coming but not likely to trouble most of us.

Posted on: 2019/10/22 1:47
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: 1955 wire wheels
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Thanks Leeedy

That's good info. Maybe not so surprising, either. The wires on mine have may well be original Packard ones. I don't know were the previous owner got them, but I think he said he bought them from a used Packard parts vendor in the US. The hubs have Ford centres welded into them, so they started life as something else and presumably were either Packard originals or repros.

The regular wheels with my car are also Ford items, but somehow the wheel covers fit.

Now I know where the Motor Wheels stamp was, I'll look at mine if I ever have a tire off!

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/31 17:12
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: 1955 wire wheels
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
This discussion prompted me to take a closer look at the wire wheels with came with my 1956 Clipper Deluxe. Of course, these Junior cars never came with the factory option of wire wheels. It sounds like they were a fairly expensive option for the other 1950s Senior cars (except for Caribbeans?). The junior cars had different wheel stud spacing than seniors, so the factory (or repro) Packard wire wheels are not interchangeable. Mine were made to fit by welding Ford centres into the hubs (which have the same stud spacing as the junior cars). Quite a workmanlike job but obviously not original.

No sign of the Motor Wheel stamping on my rims, so they are presumably repros. The spokes are chrome plated steel - unlike many current repros. Maybe not a bad thing, given the reputation of stainless spokes. Although these ones are prone to corrosion. The hub covers are presumably also repros but look right. They are more like the "flat" profile in the picture.

These wheels were acquired and modified by a previous owner. They are at least 30 years old, and no idea where they came from.

Notwithstanding all of the above, I think that wire wheels improve the rather staid appearance of most 1950s Packards, which helps to explain their current popularity. Yes, they're wrong for my Clipper but they do look good so what the heck!

Brian

Attach file:



jpg  WireWheelClipper.jpg (719.39 KB)
191498_5d68a33608d83.jpg 2048X1536 px

Posted on: 2019/8/29 21:17
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: Auction: '51 200, Beardsley, MN, August 10.2019
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2019/1/30 23:11
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Posts: 103
Yes that was my reaction, too. A mouthwatering collection of cars only needing new owners and some sympathetic restoration. I've never seen a collection like that being sold off in one go.

It reminds me that we should move our collections on before we depart this earth. That way, we have a say in where they go. It's a bit sad to see this sort of collection being auctioned off after somebody has died. There's probably a similar stash of parts lying around somewhere.

The silver lining, though, is that some of the cars will go to people who can bring them back to their former glory, and not pay so much that they can't afford to restore them.

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/8 17:32
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: John's 41 120 Convertible
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Hello

I have a 41 Club Coupe, which I'm happy to say is free of most of the issues described here. That's a lovely looking convertible, but I'm glad I don't have to deal with the roof opening mechanism! The cross I bear is that my car was converted to 12V by a previous owner.

My tuppence worth on tyres (or tires, as you say). The biggest difference between bias and radial ply tyres is what happens when they fail. It's often to do with the presence of tubes, but not always. As a motorcycle rider, I'm familiar with the catastrophe which usually follows failure of a tubed tire - including bias ply. Failure of a radial tire tends to happen more slowly, so even I have time to understand what's happening and pull up safely. That's the reason I use modern radial whitewalls on my Club Coupe - yes, in the correct sizes. I've found that virtually all vehicles perform better with the original tire sizes they were designed for. Fitting larger tires may look better, but there is no other advantage in my experience. This is especially true of vintage race cars, where suspension loads are magnified.

It's true that modern tires deteriorate faster than older ones. It may have to do with the construction, but is mostly about modern compounds. A race tire which is say two years old will be much slower than a fresh one. It's surprising how fast the modern ones deteriorate, but I would always opt for modern radial construction. I buy my race tires from US dealers with large volume turnover - the tires are invariably freshly moulded. Unlike the stuff available from local dealers where they are likely to have sat in a shed for a couple of years and are well past their prime.

So, in normal road use it's not so surprising that a useful life of 7-8 years for modern tires is the norm. I have owned vintage cars whose tires were not much younger than the car itself! They often looked fine, but were an accident waiting to happen.

This is a controversial topic, and everyone has an opinion (including me). I dare say others will hold different views!

Cheers Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/6 16:41
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: 1956 Packard Clipper
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Hi Howard

I looked at the 1955/56 Service Manual, Section 19. Has details on how the various glass is removed/replaced. I'm hoping to avoid doing that. Some of the paint stripping operators say it's possible. Nothing in the Manual about the stainless body strips, badges etc. They will definitely need to come off. Section 10 of the Manual does show how the front grille etc comes off, which will be handy.

Guess I'll dive in on the stainless body strips and figure it out! I may have to disassemble part of the interior trim to get at some fasteners.

Waiting now for cost estimates for the paint stripping. Some provide a mobile service. A fellow Packard club member has offered to take on the paint prep after it's stripped. Will then have the top colour (which I know from a former owner) professionally applied. Given the car is about 4 acres of sheet metal, the paint alone will no doubt cost quite a bit.

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/6 1:34
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: 1956 Packard Clipper
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Thanks Howard

I'll look at the 55 manual to get an idea where all the clips are located and how to access them. Have been told that some for the rear stainless trim are behind the upholstery, so may have to remove that in the process. The car had a new windshield not long ago. Don't know whether the rubber was replaced but appears to be in reasonable shape and still fairly soft. Don't know about the rear. I'm trying to avoid removing the glass and rubber for the paint job. Not sure if that's feasible.

I've ordered a set of the plastic trim removal tools which will hopefully let me ease things off gently without causing further damage.

If it all goes pear-shaped I do have a fairly good selection of spare stainless trim, badges etc (but not for the windows).

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/5 14:36
_________________
1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: 1956 Packard Clipper
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Here's a general question for the brains trust. I'm contemplating options for repainting my 1956 Clipper Deluxe. The existing finish (dark blue) was applied about 30 years ago. The top (colour) coat has reacted with the undercoat resulting in extensive crazing on exposed panels - tops of guards etc. Looks like it will have to come off.

I plan to keep the same - or similar - colour. Am hoping to avoid dismantling the body. When the car was repainted, some limited refurbishment was done (eg sills were replaced). The bodywork is generally sound (as best I can tell) with a little bit of suspicious bubbling around the lower left rear guard and wheel cover and some panel damage to one of the sills. Won't know what gives there until the paint is off.

The car is in very good condition mechanically, with everything working as it should. Original black/cream interior which I would like to preserve (with a little renovation). The front and rear chromework is all pretty good, and was obviously refinished at some point.

I'm afraid that if I start dismantling the car mechanically I will encounter problems getting it back into good running condition as it is now. Not to mention the potential cost of this level of work which I would not attempt myself. Also probably a lot more dollars than the car's worth.

My question is: What's involved in removing the stainless body trim and stainless trim around the front and rear windows? What is the best method of removing the existing paint and undercoat (not sure if I'll encounter much filler)?

Professional opinions obviously vary according to what stripping technology the operators have. Some have warned about things like soda blasting because the residue is hard to clean up. Others have suggested the old fashioned routine of remove the trim and scrape or sand it off with/without stripper. I have excluded things like Redi-Strip because it requires removing the whole body and at least partially dismantling the car. But all agree that the trim needs to come off to do the job.

Any advice or personal experience will be appreciated.

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/5 0:49
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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Re: Trunk Lid Emblem
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2019/1/30 23:11
From Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 103
Tom

It sounds like the "Deluxe" badge on your car might have been a later addition. But since you have found the missing "D", maybe just go with that! Who will know the difference?

I'm not sure if the "Packard" badge is similar size or same hole spacing.

I believe the "Packard" badge was delivered in some cases after the cars were sold. Dealers may have neglected - or been too lazy - to organise fitting them, although most 1956 Clippers seem to have them now.

Cheers

Brian

Posted on: 2019/8/4 16:02
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1941 120 Club Coupe
1956 Clipper Deluxe (RHD and auto) - for the wife, or so I told her!
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