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Re: Not cranking over
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15923
There is a lever inside the 55-6 transmission held by a setscrew which has a tendency to loosen on the shaft. It may not be directly related to the starting problem but needs to be ruled out as the possible cause of no reverse. You can disconnect the long linkage rod at the trans and move the lever on the outside to check for any play. If the suspect lever is tight to the shaft the top of the outside lever should not move more than a slight amount -- just the amount a couple of fairly snug pins connecting the inner linkage to the lever and manual valve would allow. If there is more motion than the small amount at the outside lever the regular linkage may not be able to move the manual valve all the way to the end to select reverse. If the screw is loose the end stop held by the setscrew could also have twisted out of position preventing full travel.

Another possibility is a bellcrank assy connecting the vertical and horizontal rods that form the linkage. It is located between the side of the engine and the frame and mounted in some rubber bushings. Bolts holding that assy can loosen or the rubber can deteriorate causing lost motion..

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Posted on: Yesterday 15:52:46
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Re: Not cranking over
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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If our regular vendors or no one on this forum has a parts car or a switch Gerry at Packards Southwest gerry@packardssouthwest.com might have one or Mike Dulinski who I think might be fairly close to you could probably find a switch on one of his multitude of parts cars.

Have you tried adjusting the one on the car or is there any significant play in your gearshift lever when you are in a detented gear position? If linkage or something else has loosened or is worn possibly the weight of the lever is pulling down and moving the shift tube enough to let the switch think it is out of park or neutral.

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Posted on: 9/16 16:32:54
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Re: Not cranking over
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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As measured to ground, when you turn the key to the start position if the ign switch and wiring is good the brown wire will go from reading 0v to something very close to battery voltage -- maybe a tenth or so less. You might also do a similar test at the battery. With the leads across pos and neg terminals the voltage should stay very near to 12.6 when the key is turned to start position. If it falls significantly the battery has a problem.

Before replacing the neutral switch you can remove the two brown wires from the switch and connect them together to bypass the switch temporarily. Just remember to make sure the transmission is in park when you try to start the engine.

Posted on: 9/14 16:33:13
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Re: Not cranking over
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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If the car has an Ultramatic how about the neutral safety switch. That is a switch with at least 2 brown wires on it mounted on the steering column a few inches away from the firewall. Sometimes the switches fail or the adjustment between the gearshift tube and the switch slips and the switch is not made in park or neutral. If you also have backup lights the neutral switch will have 2 additional green wires connected.

If no Ultramatic the brown wire should be a direct connection from the ign switch to the solenoid. In either configuration you could put a meter on the brown wire at the solenoid to see if voltage is present when the key is turned.

You didn't mention anything about the battery or the cable connections. It nay not be pertinent with no sound at all coming from the solenoid but a low battery or one with a failing cell can supply enough power for lights but as soon as a large demand like the starter comes along it can't supply it and acts as dead. Same with the battery terminal connections. If a layer of oxidation has built up between the post and terminal it acts like a huge resistance when a large current tries to pass thru.

Posted on: 9/14 13:45:09
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Re: 51-54 AC
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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I think Ross shares the PS pulley or adds one on cars without PS to drive the compressor. That leaves the stock fan, pump, and generator belt as is so no slippage to be concerned about.

Posted on: 9/14 10:27:46
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Re: 6 volt to 12 volt conversion with positive ground
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According to the 38-39 combo shop manual the 38 gauges were most likely Stewart-Warner and the issue you will have with modern senders is none still use the old S-W resistance range which in 38 was probably the same 100 ohms empty, 0 ohms full as was used by other S-W supplied Packard gauges thru 47. Because other brand gauges were also used for other Packard models in those years you might want to verify which brand gauge is in your car since the resistance value may not be the same. Usually but not always the brand name is stamped on the back of the gauge.

If you have the S-W gauges, they are the magnetic type with electromagnet coils so to run on 12v you will need some kind of voltage reducer. For a single gauge the Runtz type regulator is probably the best and much better than an ordinary dropping resistor for keeping the voltage at a known and stable value. If you have kept the positive ground after the conversion then those will not work and you will need to come up with a different plan. Runtz regulators are available from several places including Amazon.

Once the voltage to the gauge is correct the original sender will work if it is in good condition or can be repaired. If you need something custom for your new tank then as far as I know, the only place that might be able to make or supply a sender in the correct resistance range is KM Lifestyle. http://www.mykmlifestyle.com/Packard_Fuel_Sender_0YW2.html

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Posted on: 9/14 10:02:16
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Re: blower motor 50 Standard 8 not working
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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There should be a 30amp inline fuse between the ign switch GA terminal and the heater sw. It is hard to say which switch or end of the wire it would be closer to so you will just need to start at the heater switch and head toward the ign switch looking for a fuse holder in the wire.

Out of the heater switch should be a single wire going toward the loom or maybe a hole in the firewall. There should be an inline connector probably on the engine side located a short distance from the blower motor. You could check that the blower motor wire is connected and then disconnect it and place a meter on the switch side of the wire to see if there is voltage getting past the switch.

If you have voltage and no blower then others have found blowers that have seized up from leaves and debris caught in the housing due to a missing screen or sometimes the oil drying or turning gummy in the bearings.

Posted on: 9/13 16:19:40
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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Removing the dark blue wire from pin 2 of the flasher socket and connecting it directly to ground will place the indicator lamps in parallel with the other two. That will take the drive out of the flasher transistor and power them with the thermal part. That may work as long as the total resistance doesn't change so much the thermal spec is disrupted but will also reverse the way they would normally get power and ground since they would now be powered with the outside bulbs. You may need to reverse the lights in the cluster to have them flash with the correct side. Rather than the original way of having ground run thru the opposite off sides bulb filaments so they won't both flash at once and also take advantage of the extra resistance, they will now have power plus a solid ground and may be quite a bit brighter. This really should not be necessary if the connections and grounds are good.

The phenolic insulating board which holds the contact buttons on both the switch and inside the sockets has been known to warp or otherwise deform allowing one contact to be positioned at a different level than another generally resulting in a poor connection. The inline Wade (flat tabs) or Douglas (round bullets) connectors are also known to corrode internally particularly if they have been sitting for years in a moist environment.

As mentioned before, grounds are notorious for causing issues even if they look clean at a bolt to sheetmetal surface. The other end that is threaded into potmetal could still be corroded. Grounds for the parking lights go thru several bolt connections in the pot metal grill pieces and are particularly susceptible to the point that some owners have needed to solder or otherwise attach a ground wire directly to the socket shell and connect that wire directly to sheet metal on the fender.

One fairly easy way to tell if there is still a ground issue is to get a long length of hookup wire. Attach one end directly to the ground post on the battery and go around to each socket with the other end. Use some sandpaper to clean a bright spot directly on the socket shell and touch it with the ground wire and see if the lamps start working or get brighter.

Posted on: 9/13 9:36:14
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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From Fresno CA
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I've only tried the 535 from Napa and it did not work the indicator light as others have also found out and posted in that thread I referenced above. That is the unit I used for the photo showing the flasher with the transistor.

If you do a search there are some 535s sold by other vendors that specifically say a particular flasher is for positive or negative ground but looking at the photos they provided you cannot distinguish by part number. I cannot say if they are separate flashers with correct transistors and the vendor is using a common photo or if their flashers are made without a transistor.

There is a place in Texas that advertises a 6v positive ground electronic flasher which they say works with LEDs or incandescent bulbs or a combination of both. I have never tried their product but it may be a good option. I remember seeing ads for other electronic positive ground units from other vendors so they are not the only game around. https://litezupp.com/Flasher-Electroni ... ng-6-Volt-Positive-Ground The only bad part about electronic units could be the typical solid state polarity specific issues. Like solid state radio vibrators, if the flashers are not internally protected then an accidental reversal of the battery could damage them.

Posted on: 9/13 6:59:53
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
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A Dodge owner who posted under the name Redneck came up with the proper transistor to install instead of the original to make it work the panel lights on positive ground cars. http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... id=163962#forumpost163962


In the second or middle photo of the 535 the transistor is the little 3 wire black plastic item at the top of the photo. The correct orientation of the base, collector and emitter leads need to be soldered in place of the transistor presently there and it takes care since solid state devices are generally heat and static sensitive.

Posted on: 9/12 18:02:57
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