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Re: Shout Out to Jason at AER
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Does look good. Is Jason still by himself and was the turn around long?

Posted on: Yesterday 10:46:12
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Re: Ike's Staff Car
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That bracket photo certainly brings up more questions than it answers. Probably the slots are for the compressor and allows for belt adjustment. Possibly the two holes near the edge in the second photo with the rounded clearance openings will fit over head bolts but that still leaves the other two holes which must attach to some kind of extra bracket. With the weight of the compressor extended far over the engine something would also need to mount somewhere lower to provide support and stability. At any rate it would seem doubtful the base of the compressor could be any lower than maybe 1/2" over the top of the engine so maybe only 1-2" lower than the conventional body bracket which raises the compressor high enough to clear the manifold.

Since it is a 42 bracket anyone know if there was a change between 41 and 42 or could anyone with an original 42 parts manual see if AC components are also included in the main parts manual or are in in a separate list like 40 and 41?

Posted on: Yesterday 10:27:49
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Re: Ike's Staff Car
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Quote:
Yes, eyes open for a war era Clipper owners manual. Purchased service manual and parts manual, so the OM is needed for the trifecta.


The PAC online store has reprints of the 42 and the 46 and 47 Clipper owners manuals. They are all very very similar. Based on some items in other postwar Clipper literature I am not sure Packard did not just reprint the prewar info. They may have tried to update needed areas but failed in some places because some postwar info and illustrations is obviously prewar.

Quote:
On the Clippers, the compressor DID NOT sit up high on the engine. Like the Cadillac V-8, it was mounted lower and to the side. There would be NO WAY the compressor they used could possibly fit under the hood of a Clipper.


This has been a long standing question of mine as to exactly how the original compressor did mount on Clippers. A supposed MacArthur car has photos in a magazine article (Special Interest Auto May-June 1976) but no details on the compressor mounting other than a photo showing just the rear of the compressor. The other Clipper with AC in TX owned by Terry Weiss has been changed to a modern compressor running an underdash aftermarket unit. In this photo taken by Archiveman it is hard to say if the bracket used with the Sanden is original because of the what I think is a portion of it being under a head bolt farther down in the center of the head. To me that part looks a bit thin to be a casting and original. If it is the original bracket then with its height and based on a parts book illustration the compressor would appear to still be rather high and maybe extend to about the level of the top of the radiator. If anyone has any other photos of a Clipper AC compressor and bracket I amongst many would sure like to see them.

I keep wondering what they did with the oil filter when a Clipper had a compressor since it appears to me they used those bolt holes and definitely the location for the bracket. There is an illustration which looked like a filter might have been placed farther back near where the Electromatic would mount. In this photo of the Clipper with a Sanden and Electromatic I don't see any sign of a filter. Wonder if it was eliminated or maybe moved to sheetmetal somewhere if the car had a 356 and was equipped with both AC and EC.

The condenser is also interesting in the Clipper as it appears to be more horizontal than the one in the conventional bodies.

Attach file:



jpg  Clipper.jpg (70.44 KB)
209_5dd55e9c32be3.jpg 536X440 px

jpg  1941 PACKARD CLIPPER AC.jpg (280.79 KB)
209_5dd55ef83a731.jpg 1024X576 px

Posted on: 11/20 7:40:49
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Re: Coil wiring question
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As long as it starts and run with the wiring as is I would not change anything if the coil polarity is correct. If not then swapping the wires to the proper terminals for a positive ground should not cause any problems as long as both are swapped over and if more than one wire on the same terminal, those stay together.

The distributor looks to have been installed a tooth or two off causing the rotor to be in a different spot than Packard suggests. Not a big deal as long as you are aware of it although it might be good to make sure the "new" #1 terminal is marked or noted in case someone else works on the car and tries to use original instructions or diagrams.

Posted on: 11/19 18:30:09
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Re: Coil wiring diagram /1954 pacific/cruising rpm engine bogging/coils
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Others will have to say or maybe you could go online and see if the Pertronix will work in a Delco. If so and your car is positive ground and has the Pertronix then here is a possible wiring diagram that might partially explain the way your coil is wired. I know the GM 4L60E transmissions in which there have been a couple of Packard installs require some electrical signals to control the shifts but do not know about the 700R4. I thought those only had a cable connected to the carb linkage to control them but I could be in error. Possibly the other wire connected to the coil negative terminal is some kind of tach signal for the transmission????

No idea if it would be useful but here is a link to a site with test procedures for Pertronix positive ground setups. http://www.ttalk.info/Tech/PerPosGndTest.htm

Attach file:



jpg  Pertronix.jpg (68.61 KB)
209_5dd457b96a633.jpg 810X754 px

Posted on: 11/19 12:59:39
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Re: Coil wiring diagram /1954 pacific/cruising rpm engine bogging/coils
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Do you have the original point ignition or do you have some kind of module and solid state setup. The way you describe 2 wires on the negative terminal and a direct connection to ground on the positive terminal sounds like an aftermarket ignition of some kind. I can't really comment on solid state wiring since that depends on the setup used. Whatever the module or other solid state components would require probably differs between units and I am not too familiar with what is available.

For a non overdrive car with a set of ordinary points and a condenser located inside the dist which would be the standard configuration there would only be 2 wires involved. Power to the coil would be supplied by the wire from ign switch connected to the negative coil terminal and the points would interrupt the flow by their opening and closing connecting the positive coil terminal to ground thru the body of the distributor. If the car has an OD there would be a third wire also connected to the positive terminal which would momentarily go to ground and briefly stop the spark when kickdown is engaged.

Posted on: 11/19 11:42:03
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Re: Coil wiring diagram /1954 pacific/cruising rpm engine bogging/coils
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The lower output or less efficiency has to do with the fact that electrons become much more active when concentrated and are at elevated temperatures. That fits the spark plug operation perfectly as the center electrode will be much hotter than the side electrode and electrons are concentrated on a relatively small area. The side electrode being connected to the shell will be much cooler because of the shell acting as a heat sink. The side electrode is longer so electrons are not as concentrated.

With the wrong polarity the spark could start from anywhere along the length of the side electrode and any distance above the recommended gap and cooler less active and concentrated electrons would tend to result in a weaker spark. With the proper polarity the spark will tend to be stronger and jump much easier when going from the center electrode outward.

Posted on: 11/19 11:08:04
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Re: 1940 Packard 180
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The R9 would be correct for the 40 models but that OD is somewhat complex electrically and mechanically and was prone to some issues. R9 trans-OD units do show up from time to time but some internal parts are harder to find and more expensive than for the R11 units. If you are not as concerned about 100% authenticity and can find a 22nd or 23rd series senior transmission with the R11 it would be an easier and more reliable installation. For installing in a 180 it needs to be a senior unit because the 356 engines had a larger input shaft on the trans and heavy duty OD gears.

Repro electrical parts are also available for the R11 units and even some aftermarket parts can be adapted whereas the R9 electrical parts are specific and as far as I know, not in repro. You will need to find all the R9 specific electrical items if you are starting with a non OD car.

Packard did make R11 kits available during 22nd series production for owners of 21st series cars and in one of the instructions it was mentioned older cars which had issues with the R9 might also benefit from the kit being installed. With that in mind there could be a case made that the R11 in a prewar car is not necessarily wrong. Without crawling under, the visible differences between the R9 and R11 would be the electrical relay and kickdown switch on the firewall.

Posted on: 11/19 10:23:10
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Re: Exhaust and Intake Manifold Studs
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You didn't mention a year or engine but if the vendors cannot help, if for a 48-54 288/327 block and I believe most of the other 40 and later inline engines as well, McMaster-Carr has some hardened dual thread studs that I think will work for the 2" length although they do not look exactly like the originals. Specs say the manifold studs are 3/8-16 which I believe goes into the block and 3/8-24 for the nut side. Didn't see anything for the 4 9/16 length so those might be a vendor only or have them made type thing. https://www.mcmaster.com/94358a330

Posted on: 11/18 10:07:52
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Re: Aftermarket "green glass " windshield and windows
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2007/4/20 17:54
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The side glass is all flat glass and just about any quality glass shop should be able to cut new laminated glass to fit -- particularly if your old glass is still good enough for a pattern. If no pattern is available from your existing piece then several online places have the patterns and can cut you a perfect replacement.

The windshield is another matter as it has a slight curvature so I expect you will need to go to a shop specializing in old glass and see if they can still source a replacement windshield. The windshield was slightly different for convertibles and hardtops as compared to the sedans so no idea how much stock you will still find. Finding new convertible glass may be as difficult and expensive as finding windshields for the 55-6 models.

The modern sun shield type glass may not be the same shade or tint color as the old heat absorption type Packard used so that is another thing to be aware of unless you plan on replacing all of the glass.

Posted on: 11/16 14:19:15
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