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Re: 1939 Super 8 pinion seal replacement
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 224
See the following thread, especially post #7

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... id=179582#forumpost179582

The referenced procedure is appropriate for just about any differential with pinion bearing preload set by a sleeve that is collapsed during initial assembly.

Posted on: 9/13 17:38:49
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Re: Trunk mat
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2013/12/21 11:14
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Posts: 224
Yes it does. Thankyou

Are the two fabric pieces below the mat really two different hues of green?

Posted on: 9/7 14:27:47
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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I just saw the comment made by Ken P about the carburetor during the compression test. That got me thinking about whether the rich condition is/was nothing more than ‘ too much choke’.

Posted on: 9/6 11:24:35
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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Let’s start with the shop manual for the ’51 – ’54 cars. Look in Section XXI, titles ‘Specification’. On page 42 is a line entry for the ‘Idle Adjustment Turns Out’, which for your carburetor is 1 to 1 1/2 . . . that would be the amount the screw is rotated out from the seat.

On page 5 of the ’46-'50 Repair and Tune-Up Manual (I know it’s the wrong model carburetor, but for this circuit the statement is valid) there is a statement that then the screw is rotated ‘out’ the mixture will be enrichened.

I’ve included a pdf file that shows the two locations to adjust the idle speed and mixture. This artwork depicts the WDO carburetor, but your adjustments are in the same location and will appear identical.

The screws are ideally set to the same position off of the seat, but a slight variation is OK. Closer to the seat is less fuel. Many will advise the use of a vacuum gauge when adjusting the idle mixture. At a fixed throttle position the vacuum gauge is a surrogate for a tachometer. You should be adjusting for peak engine speed, or manifold vacuum, they are one in the same.

I would start by cleaning the adjustment screw area . . . perhaps with some brake cleaner . . . and then with the engine shut-off rotate one of the adjustment screws toward the seat (you will be rotating the screw clockwise). Be careful, what you will be doing is counting the number of turns until the seat is encountered. What I want you to be careful of is the torque you will be applying to the screw once the seat is encountered . . . do not apply a lot of torque once the screw stops rotating. Before you conduct this procedure you have made a mental note of the ‘o’clock’ position of the screw driver slot, and base the number of turns from that observation. You will rotate the mixture screw counter clockwise back to the initial position, and repeat the procedure for the other mixture screw.

OK the carburetor is adjusted back to what it was before, plus you know how many turns both screws are off of their respective seats. You will compare your results to the specified amount (1 – 1 ½ turns). If you find your car had close to the correct amount of adjustment, then a simple mixture adjustment will not likely fix the rich condition, however if the results indicate the screws are adjusted further away from the seat, by ½ or more turns, then perhaps the rich condition may be correct by a simple adjustment. You can restore the specified mixture adjustment by again finding the seat (don’t over torque) and back-out the specified amount. Do that for both screws. A word of caution the idle speed and idle mixture adjustments somewhat talk to one and other, so if you made a big change in the mixture don’t be surprised if the idle speed stop screw needs a bit of adjustment.

I will also remind you that Cater included in all of their service information that the basic health of the other engine systems should be verified before the carburetor is disassembled. Those systems include the usual suspects of ignition, both timing and point gap, spark plug gap, and valve adjustment. Only then should the float level and mixture adjustments be messed with. I take exception to the Carter mixture adjustment advice if the current adjustment is unknown.

There is one item that will cause a rich condition, but once and awhile will cure itself, that is debris holding the float valve (aka needle and seat) open just enough to richen, but not enough to flood. That's a long shot!

dp

Attach file:


pdf IdleAdjustments2102S.pdf Size: 810.33 KB; Hits: 1

Posted on: 9/6 11:18:23
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2013/12/21 11:14
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Kevinpackard, may we start with you identifying which carburetor is installed. It should have a Carter WGD 2102S as Howard identified, but after so many years ? I think we can all agree the plugs indicate a rich mixture, which may result from several ‘non-standard’ carburetor conditions. Incorrect float level height, and/or the ‘needle and seat’ valve not sealing are the two most common. I would also think with that rich of a mixture the engine would be prone to stalling, and have a distinct fuel odor. Using the published idle mixture screw starting point . . . so many turns from the seat . . . will get you in the right ball park, and will surely not be wildly rich. Once you track-down the adjustment specifications I would double check that the idle mixture screw adjustments are ‘close’.

The WGD is not an overly complex carburetor. You read the training manuals and then ask the questions, before you have 47 pieces in a coffee can. There are a few special tools required to do a complete rebuild, but I bet, based on the condition of the plugs, the real problem will likely be easy to find. Again, let’s start with the mixture screws and go from there.

dp

Posted on: 9/5 18:23:51
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Re: Trunk mat
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2013/12/21 11:14
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Posts: 224
Having made one from scratch for my ’54 Cavalier I agree. I sure would have liked that item as a template. I did have three pieces of ‘tar-paper’ which may have been below the actual mat. The sections to the left and right of the spare tire were connected by the small piece just aft of the tire. Staples were used to connect all three pieces. Are those seams just behind the spare tire, and if so what holds the three pieces together?

Posted on: 9/5 17:47:26
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2013/12/21 11:14
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Posts: 224
Agreed, however if the meter is an analog unit the needle will ‘pin’ downscale. Most digital meters will indicate a ‘negative’ voltage value if the leads are located incorrectly . . . emphasis on 'most'.

dp

Posted on: 8/18 12:15:47
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 224
Every multi-meter I have ever owned had a red (positive), and black (negative) lead.

Since your Packard is positive ground the red lead is connected to the chassis/body/battery positive, and the black lead will be touched to either side of the circuit breaker. You should have 6 volts at both poles of the breaker. The plot thickens if you don’t have voltage at both poles. No voltage at all (both poles are dead) indicates a problem with the feed into that sub-circuit. Voltage at one pole indicates an open circuit breaker. That is a broken circuit breaker, which is a common situation, but normally they work for a while and then the lights go out, only to come back on when the circuit breaker cools down.

Use your multi-meter directly on your battery to confirm A. The battery voltage you will likely find at the light switch later-on, B.) The meter works, and C.) You’ve got the positive connected to the positive and the negative connected to the negative.

Posted on: 8/18 11:19:48
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 224
Kevinpackard, just a word of caution if you use one of the ‘ice pick’ test lights . . . they are typically have a rather long un-insulated section. Be aware that when you are touching a ‘hot’ circuit the entire un-insulated length is also ‘’hot’. If you’re upside down under the dash you might lose sight that the probe is touching or close to touching a ground. Sparks will surely awaken you to that fact. Some shrink tubing, soda straw, or electrical tape placed on, or over, the majority of the probe’s length should be considered.

Also I’m pretty sure most of the test lights available today are 12 volt. Perhaps a quick test of pure battery voltage will confirm that the light is visible . . . I guess I’ve assumed your car is six volts. Checking the bulb before you crawl under the dash would be equally prudent either way.

dp

Posted on: 8/18 8:58:09
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Re: Various CL Pickings
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2013/12/21 11:14
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Posts: 224
It’s hard to tell from a photograph, but there was a stock ’53 color that appears very much the same hue. That would be Orchard Green (color scheme ‘O’). In ’54 there was another ‘light green’, known as Bellevue Green (color scheme ‘N’) that had a bit of blue in the formula. The internet photograph doesn’t appear to have enough, if any, blue, so I’ll go with Orchard Green. Both were paired with Galahad Green (color scheme ‘K’) for the two toned cars. Of course the color could have been locally mixed to please the owner, and is close, but is not an exact match to the Packard color.

Posted on: 8/17 19:39:35
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