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   All Posts (DavidPackard)


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Re: Coil wiring question
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Just a few more points on this 6 volt positive ground Pertronix stuff:

If the subject car is equipped with an overdrive (not the case in this thread) there will likely be two wires attached to the positive coil binding post. One wire goes to the ignition point set, while the other goes to the overdrive kick-down switch. When I contacted Pertronix about how the kick-down functionality could be retained they provided the attached schematic . . . essentially a 7 ohm, 5 watt resistor in series with the kick-down circuit.

If the car is currently AutoLite equipped, and a Pertronix coil is used, then the installer must provide a coil hold-down strap. Seems the Delco equipped cars used a ‘bare’ coil, just like the Pertronix replacement items, while the AutoLite coil had an integral coil clamp. See group 4.12033 in the parts book, and note the strap is only used on Delco equipped vehicles. Not a big deal to make one out of sheet stock, just be aware that ‘some assembly is required’ on AutoLite equipped cars.

dp

Attach file:


pdf Overdrive switch pos.pdf Size: 164.54 KB; Hits: 7

Posted on: Yesterday 18:01:35
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Re: Limited File Size On The Packard Club Website
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
At a Model A monthly club meeting a gentleman that creates these ‘light paintings’ gave a presentation on the process. To boil a 20 minute presentation down to a few bullet points . . .
• The scene is set when there is adequate ambient light.
• The photo sequence is created when there is little or no ambient light.
• A camera is placed in a fixed position, that is, on a substantial tripod.
• The camera is adjusted for a smaller than normal aperture, and longer than normal shutter speed. The shutter is triggered remotely.
• Multiple photos are taken, and are digitally combined into one final image.
• Each one of the multiple photos is a time-lapse where one, and only one small area of the car is ‘painted’ with a portable light . . . hence ‘light painting’. That photo will only contain the painted areas, while the rest of the scene is very dark.

‘Light painting’ photos will have a characteristic of the subject seems to be illuminated in every nook and cranny, with little or no areas in shadow. While the subject is well illuminated the background is quite dark. It takes a while to paint an object the size of a car. The gentleman suggested the ‘stitching’ of the multiple photos may be iterative, that is, the artist may reject incorporation of one or more of the photos if that content detracted from the final objective.

The views of the ’56 with the spiral white light accents are examples where the person holding the light walked through the frame with the light moving. The photo with this feature could be added to, or left-out of the final image. The photos with the white and blue spirals and the rear view of the car appear to have too few individual sub-photos. The ¾ front view would approach the desired final effect, although the shadows on the hood might have been filled in. Note a few of the photos were taken with only the interior illuminated. These might have been taken while the ‘painter’ was inside the car shinning the light onto the headliner, but they could be standing in the un-illuminated section of the photo. Equally, not all photos need to have the car’s lights on . . . only enough to have illumination appear in that area of the photo. The ‘painter’ is normally dressed in dark clothing.

I believe the final effect could be categorized as; the subject is presented in full light, while nothing in the background is illuminated. From what I understand these photos take an hour or so to ‘capture’, and some amount of time for the ‘stitching’ into a final image.

Posted on: 10/25 19:35:43
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Re: Door locks
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Let's try that link again. This is the pointer to the first item on the fifth page of the thread. Scroll down to the items with the PDF attachments . . . lots of photos of a latch disassembled, and suggestions on replacement of the rivets that will be destroyed.

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... ASC&type=&mode=0&start=40

dp

Posted on: 10/8 9:14:51
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Re: Door locks
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
If the discussion is about the replacement of the four lobed 'wheel' that engages the striker plate, then try the following postings.

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... ASC&type=&mode=0&start=44


http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... ASC&type=&mode=0&start=46

I've edited the original posting to include 'http://' and seems to be the key in adding hyper-links. I've also edited the 'start number' to point to the correct posting.

dp

Posted on: 10/8 9:07:21
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Re: 47 Rear Axle Nut Torque
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Wes;

When I torqued the axle nuts on my ’48 I set-up a jack stand, the same height as the axle, to react out the vertical force of the wrench. I used an extension about 9 inches long, so the end where the breaker bar would be attached rested on the jack stand. The breaker bar was marked at the location where I would step on it with one foot to apply the torque. By use on a short kitchen step stool I was able to slowly transfer from the stool to the breaker bar . . . again only stepping on the marked area. During the process I had to reset the set-up several times to make sure the breaker bar was level . . . that is, my weight was being applied at right angles to the bar. I shot for the lowest torque on the first attempt, and at that torque the cotter pin hole was in alignment, so I stopped, but only after I hit the hub a couple of dozen times with a light ballpeen. The tapping did not result in a reduction of torque, so I was truly finished. About 200 miles later I ‘double checked’ the torque. What I found was that most of the torque had dissipated, and I could advance the nut about 1/6 of a turn. This time the cotter pin would not align at the lowest torque, but did at a torque less than the maximum allowed. ‘Double checking’ again after another 200 miles revealed the axle nut torque was at least the minimum allowed. There are some that think the relaxation of the nut torque is the mechanism that allows alternating bending stresses at the axle thread fillet which ultimately results in a broken axle. My experience suggests that the hub could be loose on the axle if the torqueing procedure is treated as a ‘one and done’ event. I do know that the reason I was torqueing the axle nut in the first place was the previous axle had failed shortly after I bought the car. I have no idea the miles since last axle service before I bought the car. Maybe rear axle nuts should be treated like head bolts (nuts) . . . that is, you’re never done checking the torque.

While I assembled with everything dry, I did try to ‘scotch brite’ the axle taper to something less than a bright shine, but clean of rust (fretting) and goo. I used a new grade 8 flat washer, as the one on the car was heavily galled. Even with a broken axle the key I removed was not heavily worn, and under normal circumstances I would have reused it, but I replaced it anyway. The business of using tabulated torque values also assumes whether a lubricant, and type, is to be used during assembly. I’ve always be led to believe the rear axle area is assembled dry, but don’t remember where I picked that up.

By the way, I used ¾ inch drive tools and the weight of the breaker bar equated to 12 foot pound of torque all by itself without any additional weight applied. The bar is at least 36 inches long, and was bought to remove the harmonic balancer bolt when changing cam belts. Those buggers are drawn to something like 270 ftlbs and fortunately positioned so I could use the jack stand gimmick and stand on the end of the breaker bar to break the bolt loose.

dp

Posted on: 9/28 22:06:03
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Re: Hood seal rubber stripping... '39 Six
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2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Chris;

For what it’s worth many pre-war cars used lacing between the hood and cowl, such as, but not limited to early Ford products. I also believe this lacing was a commodity item, and not unique to any one car manufacturer. The reason for the brand X reference is purely cost. I think you could pull-off the entire project for less than $20 if products marketed for early Fords is used, which may have the same cross section as the original Packard item, but I don’t know that for sure. Ford lacing was attached with split rivets, which are quite easy to install, but do require a team of two. My experience is the hood lacing will show wear initially as a color change (initially black which wears to a much lighter tan color), which I keep after with a carbon black paste intended for wood stoves, but I’m sure KIWI shoe polish would suffice. I believe keeping the cord material as dry as possible is key in the longevity of the lacing, hence the paste or polish touch-up to hold down the wicking of rain water.

Or you could leave it as is, and consider the hood flapping as a gear extended upper air speed limit (Vle) warning device . . . much better than the fender flapping alternate.

dp

Posted on: 9/27 17:34:06
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Re: 49 22nd Deluxe Sedan Locks
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Good question about the ‘needle’. As I remember the square rod is attached to the lock cylinder with a joint that allows quite a bit of flexibility . . . make that too much flexibility. I’ve never attempted the ‘needle’ technique, but I would suspect it starts with pushing a needle from the outside of the car through the door panel/card, noting the location, and then at the same location pushing the needle from inside the car back through the latch. I believe the square rod has a dimple in the end that the needle will index into. The lock & rod and the needle are moved into position as one assembly, with a bit of teasing as the rod enters the latch.

Now here’s the good news, if you ‘zip tie’ (use a real small one) the stainless rectangular stock that reinforces a wind shield wiper blade to the square rod you can manipulate the rod as it approaches the latch mechanism. Once the rod engages you will still have enough room to extract the rectangular stainless piece. You’ll end-up with a ‘zip tie’ around the rod, but no needle hole in the door panel/card.
If the door panels/cards are removed you should succeed without the use of a needle.

Posts 45 & 47 of the following link illustrates what’s inside the 22nd/23rd series door latch
packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?topic_id=19146&viewmode=flat&order=ASC&type=&mode=0&start=40

dp

Posted on: 9/17 16:22:12
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Re: Documents: exploded views of major body parts with PNs
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
‘Chilton Job No.’ and ‘Chilton Labor Price’ appears toward the bottom of the 2206 Super & Custom file., perhaps others, but as yet I haven’t looked at all of the files.

Posted on: 8/21 14:38:38
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Universal Joint Service
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
I hate to admit how much I learned from this video series about universal joint replacement. After watching the Weber State University offering I searched for other videos on the same subject . . . eye opening! Apparently many others advocate bending the yoke, with a very large hammer, to achieve the correct bearing cup end play. It’s well worth the time watching John Kelly achieve the same end without a hammer.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=w ... D15D883D1662255&FORM=VIRE

or search 'Weber State University Universal joint' that should get you to the 6 part series.

dp

Posted on: 8/15 9:01:47
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Re: Change of radiator core affecting cooling performance in 1949, 23rd series
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Joined:
2013/12/21 11:14
From Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 142
Joe;

Four years ago I installed a PowerMaster PowerGEN 6 volt positive ground unit. You get to choose pulley width . . . I opted for the 5/8-3/4 versus 3/8. The ‘long GM’ unit drops right in. The only locally supplied part was the spacer in the third bolt position, and a longer than normal bolt to suit. That spacer allowed the Packard ‘strap’ to be used without a ‘bend to fit’ modification. PowerMaster’s website states that this unit will provide 50 amps at idle, but I’m not sure they appreciate how low the idle is on a Packard, so temper your expectations. I suspect it will be at least 30 amps.

My car was originally equipped with Autolite equipment, so I fitted the Autolite data plate that I got from EBay (Delco tags are equally available). Also the alternator did not come with a Field binding post, so the end cap and aft extension piece were removed to facilitate the drilling of the pseudo Field pole. All of the OEM wiring was insulated, folded-back, and wrapped with black vinyl tape. The warning tag on the Field pole was a PowerPoint project.

The main output power is first routed to a head-light relay set-up, and then to the ‘BAT’ side of the voltage regulator. This head-light relay system consists of two circuit breakers, and two relays . . . one circuit for the high-beam, and another for the low-beam. The head light electrical load at the OEM head-light switch has been reduced by approximately 16 amps. I run a higher than normal idle speed, and the ammeter does not indicate a discharge at idle with the head-lights ON. I also have a voltmeter plugged into the cigar-lighter socket, and it indicates 6.8-6.9 volts at the same condition. That would indicate some current margin is still available.

Knock on wood, no issues since installed. Now if I could only find some short, counter-sunk, metric, slotted head screws, I’d be all set.

dp

Attach file:



jpg  001A.JPG (491.22 KB)
34287_5d4b93e7e70b9.jpg 2048X1536 px

Posted on: 8/7 20:16:26
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