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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15203
If you have a decent air compressor an air chisel is not too expensive and should work well. If no air, then more expensive but an electric die grinder with an aggressive burr or even a cutoff wheel if there is room are also options. If power is not an option then the old fashioned hammer, cold chisel and a few choice words when the chisel moves or you hit it off center and send it flying should do it.

Posted on: 7/15 13:07:41
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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Joined:
2008/2/16 15:39
From Santa Fe
Posts: 5223
Maybe buy a couple of universal tailpipe hangers from your favorite auto parts store instead of using an old tire for the exhaust pipe hanger-clamp. You can use the rubber parts from these hangers. Just a suggestion...

Posted on: 7/17 9:14:19
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The past is a different country: They do things differently there. (L.P. Hartley)
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/11/1 19:59
From Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 144
*facepalm* of course!

Posted on: 7/17 10:10:42
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/11/1 19:59
From Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 144
Regarding suspension bushings; if I wanted to apply Mr Heinmuller's kit of new/upgraded bushings is this something that would risk accidentally (or even purposefully) unloading the torsion bars? I'm trying to figure if this is something that I, as a relative noob, can accomplish on my own or if it is best left to a shop.

Posted on: 7/22 6:44:24
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15203
In doing the front you do need to hold the bars but not unload them. There is a tool to hold the front and Dwight has the tool for sale or you can rent one from him. Without the tool you can use chains but it makes the job more difficult with having the chains wrapped around things while you are removing the A arms.

The rears are more of a problem. Most rear bushings can be changed without doing much of anything but IMO, for safety and an easier time getting things back together the rear load arms should be held while the front bushings on the support or torque arms are replaced but there is no small rear holding tool -- just the huge unloading tool and those are not readily available. The rear load arms are captured in a slot in the frame and with a controlled release and maybe a little extra something to ensure the support arms do not spread when the front bushing is loosened they really cannot go too far so care and caution would be the best on the rears.

I notice Dwight sends a DVD with the kit but no idea what it shows. It might have some recommendations or show how to do the job or hold the bars without the tool and do the job safely. Maybe worth a call or email him and ask or possibly Ross can offer some procedures and suggestions.

Posted on: 7/22 6:53:09
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/11/1 19:59
From Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 144
Dumb question - should I be using a heavier weight oil in the summer, temperatures almost never below the 90s.

After I changed my oil this spring the ticking I was hearing went away, but as soon as the temperatures shot up it is always there now. I'm wondering if the heat is just causing the oil to thin out too much.

Posted on: 7/28 9:43:36
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/3/14 16:01
From New Jersey
Posts: 15503
You don't say what oil you're presently using and I don't know what your winter temperatures are, and if you use the car year-round. A 10W-40 might be a good choice for your climate for year-round use, you might also consider one of the 15W-40 light truck oils.

Posted on: 7/28 11:22:21
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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Joined:
2007/11/1 19:59
From Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 144
Sorry currently using 20w50, winter temps usually hover just about freezing an I only occasionally drive it in winter. Mostly driving in spring and autumn or summer nights because it's so damned hot lol

Posted on: 7/28 16:16:38
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
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2007/3/14 16:01
From New Jersey
Posts: 15503
Ah, you edited your post. You're already about maxed out on viscosity.

Posted on: 7/29 11:29:02
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Re: TrevorK's 1955 Packard Patrician
Home away from home
Joined:
2007/11/1 19:59
From Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 144
Well...guess I should replace the lifters. The service manual outlines a very extensive process, but I was considering just removing the valve covers and getting at the lifters with a remover tool. Any reasons I shouldn't go this method?

Posted on: 7/29 12:20:48
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