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Intake Manifold Vac lines
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Joined:
2016/3/1 6:56
From Houston, TX
Posts: 156
Hi,
A couple of educational questions regarding the steel (vac) lines on the intake manifold. I assume this bottom 'nub' is vacuum although not connected to anything. Page 2 of the Engine chapter in the Service Manual shows a depiction of this "nub" as well. Is it meant for anything? As I re-assemble my engine I'm getting to know its intimate details and curious about what this is/was (it looks to be 'professionally' closed off).

Also, see the 2nd pic on the line that comes off the exhaust gas warming feature of the intake. My line is twisted, rusted, and doesn't look like it has a good seal. Do you know of a way to remove this without it breaking off so that I can replace it with a new line? The line twists when I try to loosen it.
Related question: I am going to paint the intake manifold the Hirsch Ivory. I'm guessing the paint will burn off this part of the manifold as it is gets as hot as exhaust gases and most 352s I see have this section discolored. I plan on using black exhaust pipe paint for these 2 areas unless someone has figured out a why to make the ivory withstand the heat.


As always, thank you for reading,
Bob

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jpg  intake man nub.jpg (28.67 KB)
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jpg  intake man steel line.jpg (41.51 KB)
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jpg  intake man '.jpg (44.23 KB)
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Posted on: 2017/10/14 17:37
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Bob
1955 Packard Patrician
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15934
That "nub" is the bottom end of the choke stove. As you said, exhaust heats the air drawn thru the tube by vacuum in the carb pulling air over the choke bimetal spring. The part in the manifold is pressed in and should be air tight so no exhaust exits around the tube at either end or thru any rusted out spots in the tube. The portion continuing on to the carb and choke just slides in the upper end about an inch -- maybe less. That part is snug but not really an airtight connection. It should be able to slide out but since they were steel tubes if it won't came apart it could be rusted solid. The crimp on the bottom is not connected to anything and is probably there to kind of restrict the amount of air flow so it has a chance to get heated.

I don't know of anything that will keep the ivory paint from showing the heat and it seems to be evident on just about all the ivory colored engines. I don't think any high temp engine color paint is available but wonder if there is a higher heat stove or radiator paint available at the hardware store that would be a close enough match to the ivory.

Posted on: 2017/10/14 17:59
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Howard
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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Joined:
2016/3/1 6:56
From Houston, TX
Posts: 156
Thank you for your response. The line going from the manifold to the carb is kinked and needs to be replaced. But it won't easily come out. I will try some PB blaster and if it is just a friction fitting I'll take liberties with it an not worry about destroying it.

thanks again

Posted on: 2017/10/31 13:38
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Bob
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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Joined:
2016/3/1 6:56
From Houston, TX
Posts: 156
My attempts at removing the steel line in one piece were not successful. It looks like the steel line from the choke slides inside a larger diameter line, the choke stove, that is inside the manifold itself. I've tried using a torch to heat them up, PB blaster, lots of pulling etc., but no luck as they are probably rusted together.

Any suggestions as to how to liberate the steel tube from the choke stove?

thank you.

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jpg  Choke stove2.jpg (306.01 KB)
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jpg  Choke stove1.jpg (278.42 KB)
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Posted on: 2018/1/5 20:05
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Bob
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15934
One thing that should work is to get a set of number or letter drills and after cutting the tubing off close to the stove start with a drill just barely larger than the ID of the tube you are trying to get out. Drill as straight as possible and be sure to follow the tube and not angle off into the stove. Use another drill just a few thousandths larger and repeat. Do this until the last drill you use is the size of the OD of the tube. You won't need to go very deep -- maybe a half inch or so.

Unless someone has soldered the old tube in the stove it shouldn't take more than a drill size or two before the rust lets go or the tube walls are so thin you can break the old tube out of the stove. If the tube starts to rotate or as you break the walls be careful something isn't pushed down into the stove. If it is brazed or soldered you will have to go thru more sizes until the OD of the tube is reached.

After the old tube is out use a file or a final drill to clean up and make the opening a size the new tube OD will barely slide into. As long as the stove has not rusted you should have plenty of thickness to work with. Be sure to blow any chips or filings out of the stove so they don't get sucked into the choke area.

Posted on: 2018/1/5 20:44
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Howard
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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The line your working with..goes smaller where it goes in other piece.

There is a ridge that stops line and sorta seals ..line..

Posted on: 2018/1/5 20:55
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Riki
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Re: Intake Manifold Vac lines
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Joined:
2016/3/1 6:56
From Houston, TX
Posts: 156
Great advice. After 2 drill bits, the remnants started to spin and was easily removed. Thank you very much for your help. I've replumbed my brake lines and fuel lines with Cunifer tubing and might use it to replace this choke line a well. Only drawback of cunifer is that it is soft and needs more supports than a standard steel line, but bends so easily.


thanks again!
-Bob

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jpg  20180106_170222.jpg (310.48 KB)
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Posted on: 2018/1/6 20:53
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Bob
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