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Re: Packard Bikes
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Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
Quote:

Packard newbie wrote:
Interesting stuff, Leeedy. I know it's a bit off 'Packard-topic' but this thread IS about 'Packard' bikes, and they're not REALLY 'Packard'-related, so hope it's okay if I get a little bit further 'off-topic'. Just as a tidbit sidebar, I mentioned that my bike was a single-speed as opposed to a 3-speed, which was what was available at the time, before the 5/10/18 speed gear-cluster versions that hit the market shortly after. Most CCM 3-speeds had a Sturmey Archer gear-changer, that we all remember as having that little chain coming out of the centre of the hub and being activated by a thumb lever on the handle bars. They were considerably more expensive than CCM's single speed and clearly out of my price bracket in the early 60's. When I say my bike was a 'top-of-the-line' CCM, I should probably rephrase that as saying it was the most expensive single speed on the floor at my home-town hardware store. There were several and I remember riding away on MY new 'steed' thinking I had the world on a string. It came with a very cool motorcycle like kickstand and a spring-loaded air pump that engaged in a couple of point brackets under the main cross bar. And the reason I mention the 3-speed hub is because there was an old English fellow who lived in town named Archer McCrumb. He said his Mom's maiden name was 'Archer' and was the related (I forget just how) to James Archer of Sturmey-Archer. I recall him talking about the company having some pre-war motorcycle pedigree, but said his relative James, was in on the design and development of the famous 3-speed bicycle hub. Knowing you lived in Canada at some point, thought that might be of some interest. I have no 'proof' of the claim, other than his story, but no real reason to doubt it either. You seem to be pretty up on your bicycle history; know anything about it?? I know it was quite common back in the day to 'preserve' a woman's maiden name in the naming of the children of a marriage. Cool bit of trivia, eh? (as we Canadians so love to say! LOL) Chris.



And again... just to show I really DO have the stuff I say, here is my Sturmey-Archer Master Catalogue... it's old!

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jpg  Surmey-ArcherMasterCat–2WM.jpg (911.94 KB)
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Posted on: 5/3 12:16:34
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Re: Packard Bikes
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Joined:
2007/12/11 17:31
From Detroit, MI
Posts: 987
In the early 1940s the Detroit bike licenses were stamped with the year of registration. One would suspect the license was renewed annually.

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jpg  41 license.jpg (22.22 KB)
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Posted on: 5/3 13:58:37
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1941 Model 160 Convertible Sedan
1941 Model 120 Business Coupe

My biggest fear is that when I die, my wife will sell all my "toys" at the price I told her I paid for them.
Ain't no such thing as a lonely widow that inherited a barn full of old cars
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Re: Packard Bikes
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Joined:
2015/1/16 9:43
From sw, pa
Posts: 1241
Never heard tell of needing a license for a bicycle.....

Posted on: 5/3 14:06:01
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
Quote:

RogerDetroit wrote:
In the early 1940s the Detroit bike licenses were stamped with the year of registration. One would suspect the license was renewed annually.



That's a nice one, Roger. Yes, (in theory) in the City of Detroit you were supposed renew your bicycle license annually. Many other cities did likewise. But as long as you had your bicycle licensed, the police usually didn't make a big deal over it. However, if you didn't have your bicycle licensed at all...that was a different matter!

Bicycle theft was a big and growing problem in those days and one of the big purposes of licensing was so that the serial number was registered and known to law enforcement in the case of theft. Detroit had a bicycle pound (actually several of them) and that's where your bicycle went if stolen–if the robbers were caught or if the bicycle was abandoned. Or both.

(By the way, I have photos of the bicycle pounds where there were piles and piles of recovered stolen and abandoned bicycles. In Detroit there were occasional police auctions held sat the bicycle pounds).

My J.C. Higgins Wonderide was stolen and stripped at Pingree Park in 1956. It was a VERY nice place in those days in spite of the new rougher kids moving into the area who weren't so nice. The police officers actually put what was left of my bicycle in the trunk of their squad car and gave me a ride home... then explained to my dad what had happened. Anyway, they said it was because my bicycle was legitimately licensed and up to date, so they felt they should bring me home with it and help. They even hauled the bicycle up onto the front porch! That wouldn't happen today!

Because I disobeyed my dad's rule about NOT taking my bicycle to the park, I ended up having to pay for the parts lost out of my allowance and paper route money. In the end, I put it all back together just like new and still have it to this day–in mint condition...

I think I mentioned earlier that General Motors and Packard Motorcar Company both sponsored bicycle safety programs. Packard is the tough one to find items on today. Packard and GM also sponsored what were known in the 1930s and 1940s as "Juvenile Bicycle Court" (no kidding) wherein there was an actual court appearance involved before a special judge (usually not a real one). Rulings were legally binding! Offenses were illegal turns, speeding, riding at night without light and reflector, etc. You get the idea.

Posted on: 5/3 16:30:56
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Re: Packard Bikes
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Joined:
2016/3/13 15:24
From Coalmont, B.C., Canada
Posts: 952
Very interesting stuff, Leeedy, Roger. Bike licenses were not a 'thing' when I grew up in BC and my Dad was always strict about recording serial numbers and having pictures. I did have a gorgeous 3-speed stolen. It had every bell and whistle in the Simpson Sears catalogue on it and was my prize possession. I THOUGHT maybe the serial number might help get it back and made the whole police report, etc., but never heard or saw anything of it again.
The Sturmey Archer catalogue is very cool Leeedy, thanks for posting that, but know, you don't have to prove you 'have the stuff' as far as I am concerned. When it comes to bike knowledge, I submit you have few equals and no superiors!! Chris.

Posted on: 5/3 19:21:26
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'If you think you can, or you think you can't, you're right!' Henry Ford

1939 Six, Model 1700

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/registry/index.php?Action=view&ID=1823
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
Quote:

Packard newbie wrote:
Very interesting stuff, Leeedy, Roger. Bike licenses were not a 'thing' when I grew up in BC and my Dad was always strict about recording serial numbers and having pictures. I did have a gorgeous 3-speed stolen. It had every bell and whistle in the Simpson Sears catalogue on it and was my prize possession. I THOUGHT maybe the serial number might help get it back and made the whole police report, etc., but never heard or saw anything of it again.
The Sturmey Archer catalogue is very cool Leeedy, thanks for posting that, but know, you don't have to prove you 'have the stuff' as far as I am concerned. When it comes to bike knowledge, I submit you have few equals and no superiors!! Chris.


The place for stuff in B.C years back when was either in New Westminster or Surrey. These shops were called "Cap's Bicycles" and they even had a museum. May be gone now, I don't know. But they knew me.

And Simpson-Sears in Canada primarily sold J.C. Higgins (usually different from USA) and CCM bicycles.

Posted on: 5/3 20:04:49
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
And again... for something completely different from my collection. Check out this headline article from the front page of the June, 1947 issue of the factory-to-dealer publication, Packard News. Yes, I have the whole issue.

This interesting test device was quite advanced for its time. But the wheels here don't merely LOOK like bicycle wheels... they ARE bicycle wheels!

For a while this device with any other PMCC test devices were on display in 1947 at the Packard Proving Grounds in what was termed a "hall of science."

The fifth wheel may be thought of today in connection with towing, but this particular device served as a super-accurate electric speedometer input.

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jpeg  IMG_5239.jpeg (588.84 KB)
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Posted on: 5/9 15:00:26
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
And... something special for all those who have shown interest in this thread over 10,000 hits. Here is an original magazine advertisement from my collection. It shows that Packard Motor Car Company was very much aware of bicycles and undoubtedly they knew about Packard-branded bicycles.

But PMCC saw bicycles as merely an inspirational stepping stone for boys, leading to a real automobile. Preferably a Packard! So is it any wonder that PMCC turned a blind eye to all of the many bicycles and bicycle gadgets/accessories branded "Packard"?

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jpg  PackardAndBicycleAD.jpg (1,205.64 KB)
1249_5eb9acbe826e8.jpg 1519X1948 px

Posted on: 5/11 12:52:09
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/2/16 15:39
From Santa Fe
Posts: 5451
Many here recall that auto magazines in the 50s and 60s used a bicycle wheel to drive a speedometer in their road tests and would cite the differences between the factory speedometer readings and their accurate bicycle wheel driven one.

Posted on: 5/11 16:06:39
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Packards Owned -
37 Six (115C) Convertible Coupe (1089) - Now in Belgium
47 Clipper Custom Super Touring Sedan (2122) - Now in Virginia
55 Cipper Super Sedan (5542) - Now in Maryland

We move toward and make happen what occupies our mind. (W. Scherer)
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Re: Packard Bikes
Home away from home
Joined:
2009/1/24 9:59
From Davis, CA
Posts: 721
Quote:

JW wrote:
Many here recall that auto magazines in the 50s and 60s used a bicycle wheel to drive a speedometer in their road tests and would cite the differences between the factory speedometer readings and their accurate bicycle wheel driven one.


Yes, that much is true. We were using such devices in the 1980s/1990s at Mazda Corporation. And I knew numerous other OEMs along with magazines that continued using them. But... I believe Packard was first to develop this device, using bicycle wheels.

Posted on: 5/11 16:11:22
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