The Most Comprehensive Free Online Reference for Packard Owners
Become a member of Packard Motor Car Information, right now! (it's free)
Login
Username:

Password:

remember me

Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Who's Online
49 user(s) are online (36 user(s) are browsing Packard Forums)

Members: 3
Guests: 46

Owen_Dyneto, John Iaccino, Mahoning63, more...



« 1 2 (3)


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Home away from home
Joined:
2016/3/13 15:24
From Coalmont, B.C., Canada
Posts: 701
That is very nice fabrication Duncan Micheal. I did not realize the sixes were that different in years that close together. The more I learn about these cars, the more it becomes apparent '39 is a bit of a stand-alone edition, with a lot of things being specific to that year only. My 245 has two threaded ports in the block on the left side (driver's) and, as I posted, that's where the 'last guy' tied in to plumb a conventional 'modern' filter. I'm sure Larry will be back to you with further questions on your engineering and fabricating. Again, great job. Chris

Posted on: 11/30 18:08:58
_________________
'If you think you can, or you think you can't, you're right!' Henry Ford

1939 Six, Model 1700

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/registry/index.php?Action=view&ID=1823
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
I would be interested in the connection points for the tubing.

With 80 years of build up gone from the block I would like to provide some cleaning of the oil ,

I am debating on the oil to use and am looking at 10/30 synthetic.

I live in the Pacific NW and we only have about 2 to 3 weeks a year where we get into the 80"s and normally don't get below 35 that often, Course tonight its about 28 out...

I have the block back, went to late year 10 over rod bearings, ( had the rod caps opened for them to fit).
Getting ready to start reassembly after getting a couple of little items.

Thanks for reaching out.

LArry

Posted on: 11/30 20:45:47
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
Duncan
That looks like a "factory" install :)

Great pictures,

I'm also finding out the 37 has a lot of uniqueness unto its self.

Posted on: 11/30 20:47:39
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Home away from home
Joined:
2016/3/13 15:24
From Coalmont, B.C., Canada
Posts: 701
Hi Larry,
When I was discussing various things with the machine shop that rebuilt my engine, like initial startup, break-in, head torquing, and recommended oil to use, etc., I suggested synthetic oil and the head tech vehemently denounced the use of synthetic oil in engines of that vintage. I wish I could remember all the detail of the reasons WHY, and I'm sure there will be plenty of folks weighing in with various degrees of agreement/disagreement on this; I am simply passing along what the rebuilders told me. One thing I do recall is they recommended an oil with high zinc content and when I asked them what viscosity, the guy said he would put 20/50 in it. I have been using a 'high zinc' 'Hot Rod & Classic Car' oil that I buy at our equivalent of NAPA and so far, I haven't uncovered any downside to that choice. The car starts fine, even in cooler weather, runs cool, doesn't use any oil (after the initial 200 miles or so of break-in) and I have great oil pressure. The engine also 'sounds' great, almost everyone comments on how smooth and quiet it is. You, of course, should do what is best for your car and your area, re temps and hills, etc. Just passing along what was recommended to me from, what I would consider, a knowledgeable and competent source. Chris.

Posted on: 12/1 16:54:59
_________________
'If you think you can, or you think you can't, you're right!' Henry Ford

1939 Six, Model 1700

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/registry/index.php?Action=view&ID=1823
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
Thanks for the info.. Looking at Coalmont, B.C., Canada on the map I believe you have a few more hills than I do here in the Puget Sound basin , I'l be checking with the local NAPA dealer for oil, Larry

Posted on: 12/1 19:17:02
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
. Working on left driver side motor mount. Attached are picture of my parts that I had bagged.
Question I have is the Casteel nut stud install location. And my broken shoulder washer. 1/2 id hole 1" od.
See photographs.
Took this apart 11 months ago, now I'm trying to remember where they go. Aarg.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks to all
Larry.

Attach file:



jpg  20191212_123414.jpg (433.83 KB)
155070_5df2a78dea01a.jpg 2048X1536 px

Posted on: 12/12 12:50:12
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
Figured this out this afternoon.
This is part of the snubber assembly.
The The stud bolts to bottom of transmission. The cupped washer rides with the lips towards the top and provides a sliding action on the snubber.
I found this when I took the snubber off of the frame mount. The snubbed was original to the car. See photos

Attach file:



jpg  20191212_134900.jpg (553.79 KB)
155070_5df2d280e97a6.jpg 2048X1536 px

jpg  20191212_134823.jpg (499.09 KB)
155070_5df2d2c958931.jpg 2048X1536 px

Posted on: 12/12 15:52:52
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/12/12 21:29
From Dallas, TX
Posts: 1632
Correct indeed...and the snubber is what I call version 1.0, basically two steel strips with a piece of vulcanized rubber between. Can buy new from Steele. Or...get creative and devise something more modern. But I'll leave that discussion until after I finish my beer...

Posted on: 12/12 18:56:27
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
I have a replacement snubber / stabilizer.
(Forum QUESTION) Where do I find the replacement specialized washer ?

I'll call MAX MERRITT tomorrow to see if they have one now that I know where and what the broken part is and used for.

Posted on: 12/12 21:55:41
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1937 115C mechanical refresh
Quite a regular
Joined:
2017/3/13 21:07
From Poulsbo, Washington
Posts: 36
Here is what I found in the parts book.section 5.15001

It appears to be. 196801
Washer. 120's through to 115c
Larry

Posted on: 12/13 21:46:27
_________________
Larry Reber
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



« 1 2 (3)




[Advanced Search]


Search
Recent Photos
Random Photo
1933 Packard roadster - gray - rvr
Helping Out
PackardInfo is supported and funded by user donations. If you would to help out by either donating content, or funds to help with the upkeep and hosting of this site please EMAIL ME or click on the donate button.