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Re: Which parts get what color?
Quite a regular
Joined:
2016/10/6 6:59
From Grants Pass Oregon
Posts: 30
So no one has yet answered my original question. Do I paint the underside of the fenders and the cab body color or black? Should the frame be semi gloss then? How about all the interior? If the exterior is blue, how about the area under the dash and inside the doors? Thanks, Bob

Posted on: 12/10 18:34:01
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Re: Which parts get what color?
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/3/21 18:20
Posts: 2132
One has to keep the assembly line process in mind. The bodies were welded up and doors hung, washed, dried and painted pretty thoroughly with red oxide primer. Prewar doors seemed to come from Budd already in primer as one can often read that name somewhere on the inner surface once the upholstery is away. Later cars, and possibly yours, passed over jets of black enamel to get a little something on the bottom. Finish paint was done by people standing outside the car with spray guns, so was around the door jambs and then all external surfaces and the bottom of the trunk lid. So there will be overspray around the edges of the interior surfaces, some up behind the rocker panels, and a bit down where the firewall meets the floor pans. No one was masking for neat lines in those areas.

Fenders were usually dipped in black enamel and baked. They would travel down the line on a jig and get topcoat sprayed on the topside and around the edges. Can guarantee you that parts were not lovingly turned over by hand to allow them to be sprayed on the bottom.

Cheap black enamel is not by nature glossy so semi-gloss would be good.

Posted on: 12/11 4:20:46
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Re: Which parts get what color?
Quite a regular
Joined:
2016/10/6 6:59
From Grants Pass Oregon
Posts: 30
Thanks Ross for taking the time to answer. I don't intend to show this car in a concours so I won't be doing the overspray action. The most attractive paint process would be to spray body color under the fenders and cab. The best solution to quiet the ride and protect against rust would be to undercoat everything. Or, the easiest would be to paint everything underneath black. Guess I'll think a little more and decide which choice is best, Bob

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Posted on: 12/11 6:08:16
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Re: Which parts get what color?
Home away from home
Joined:
2008/8/19 13:54
From S.E.Mich
Posts: 170
The process as described in the salesman's handbook stated that all bodies were given a coat of black for final visual inspection of panel fit and quality. This practice continued through the Clipper years. Once approved all the outer surfaces got their final color and lighter colors recieved a light base 1st (I'm guessing something similar to a light grey sealer and on some I've seen red oxide so it may have been a "wet on wet" process?). After the outer surfaces were done a masking of the jamb areas and a finish coating of the final color applied. Only the outer surface was then cut and polished. This logically presumes that the undersides of the fenders and floors were simply left black. I have at times seen this in person having had the chance to view many an original car over 4+ decades in restoration. It's also logical to presume that senior models may have rec'd a little more "love" and less rush to production given their exponentially higher price tags. Of interest I have a 41 160 in the shop with 35K original miles and a 3 owner car. It came with documentation as to the mileage and it's "original paint", but it's black and the firewall is Packard Blue. Given the last time it changed hands (1973) I find it hard to believe someone did a "restoration" so thorough as to include under easy to remove trim parts and full jambs as well as below the decklid. My guess (and it's just that) is the original selling dealer may have painted it in full refinish service standards to accomodate a sale. All the lower surfaces are just a simple black as always seen before. Owens Dyn is correct in that regular production enameling was used on frames. I've seen a slight gloss as well as what looks semi-gloss. Production enamel was chosen for speedy dry time and lower unit cost. As we've all seen, leave it to the elements and it's gonna go flat. Given all the stuff above (asked the time and built a clock) you won't do yourself or the car's authenticity a disservice by just spraying the chassis black. Maybe not a double throw down ultra glossy show urethane job, but not necessarily low gloss either. Cover it, be thorough, you get what you get when it's dried. On the outside, if you decide lacquer you better stock up on Preparation H before you get a quote. It's about 400% higher priced these days given all the eco-minded limits we face. Have fun...

Posted on: 1/3 16:31:41
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