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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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2014/7/15 11:30
From Terrebonne, OR
Posts: 2000
Quote:
The car appears to have been converted to manual steering. The manual cross link is there, but the power steering pump is tied off to the side. So havenít decided if I will leave it manual, or put the power back in (the power cross link is in the Packard Shed).


If the car originally had power steering and you decide to keep the non-power, be sure that the pitman and idler arms are for the non-power steering cars. I canít speak specifically for the V8 models but at least in 1952 the power steering arms were longer and gave a slightly tighter steering radius when so equipped but if used on a car without power, the wheel will be much harder to turn.

Posted on: 1/29 0:07:32
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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12/4 13:08:14
From Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 37
Quote:

PackardDon wrote:
Quote:
The car appears to have been converted to manual steering. The manual cross link is there, but the power steering pump is tied off to the side. So havenít decided if I will leave it manual, or put the power back in (the power cross link is in the Packard Shed).


If the car originally had power steering and you decide to keep the non-power, be sure that the pitman and idler arms are for the non-power steering cars. I canít speak specifically for the V8 models but at least in 1952 the power steering arms were longer and gave a slightly tighter steering radius when so equipped but if used on a car without power, the wheel will be much harder to turn.


That is good to know!! Ill have to check the part manual to see if there is indeed a different number between the two. Ill have to check that out.



Owen_Dyneto
I was aware of the two gear sets you mentioned. However, given that I barely got two turns out of the drive shaft after one revolution of the wheel I figured it would be the lowest of the gear sets and I would of gotten closer to 3 turns of the driveshaft for the 3.31 or 3.07

Posted on: 1/29 6:04:18
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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2007/3/14 16:01
From New Jersey
Posts: 16164
I think you are incorrectly calculating the rear axle ratio from the # of turns of the shaft versus the road wheel. Driveshaft turns to produce 1 road wheel revolution must be multiplied by 2 to give the differential ratio. And of course when making the measurement the other road wheel needs to held still or on the pavement.

Another thing on the steering you might check, Packards with power steering had different (faster) ratio steering gear boxes than those in cars with manual steering. The different ratios are all given in the specifications in the 1956 Service Counselors. For example in the 1956 Patrician, the power steering gear box was 16.4/1, in the manual steering 22.3/1.

Posted on: 1/29 6:51:44
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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Joined:
12/4 13:08:14
From Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 37
Quote:

Owen_Dyneto wrote:
I think you are incorrectly calculating the rear axle ratio from the # of turns of the shaft versus the road wheel. Driveshaft turns to produce 1 road wheel revolution must be multiplied by 2 to give the differential ratio. And of course when making the measurement the other road wheel needs to held still or on the pavement.

Another thing on the steering you might check, Packards with power steering had different (faster) ratio steering gear boxes than those in cars with manual steering. The different ratios are all given in the specifications in the 1956 Service Counselors. For example in the 1956 Patrician, the power steering gear box was 16.4/1, in the manual steering 22.3/1.



Huh... I thought you only did the multiplication factor when dealing with an open rear end... but if that is the case it would be either the 3.54, 3.9 (55 gear) or 4.09. Which is good, so long as it is not a 55 rear due to needing a puller to get the drum off, correct? So I need to take a rear wheel off and see what style rear end I have. On a 56 I should just be able to slide the drum off without a puller correct?

and good to know about the steering box! dang... even more to think about now. Would these idle/pitman arms and steering box have part numbers marked on them for me to figure out what I have?

Posted on: 1/29 9:13:32
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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2007/3/14 16:01
From New Jersey
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You can easily tell a 1955 (Packard-built) from a 1956 (Dana built) rear axle by simple visual observation. The Dana unit has a stamped steel rear cover plate retained by threaded capscrews, the Packard unit does not have a removable rear cover, you pull the entire pumpkin from the forward side to access the internals.

Or just pull a rear wheel cover, 56 has lug nuts on studs attached to the axle flange, 55 has lug bolts threaded into the brake drum.

Posted on: 1/29 9:26:51
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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Joined:
12/4 13:08:14
From Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 37
Quote:

Owen_Dyneto wrote:
You can easily tell a 1955 (Packard-built) from a 1956 (Dana built) rear axle by simple visual observation. The Dana unit has a stamped steel rear cover plate retained by threaded capscrews, the Packard unit does not have a removable rear cover, you pull the entire pumpkin from the forward side to access the internals.

Or just pull a rear wheel cover, 56 has lug nuts on studs attached to the axle flange, 55 has lug bolts threaded into the brake drum.




Thank you for that Owen_Dyneto. After I posted I realized the packard rear end had to have the drum pulled off after a nut was removed from the axle shaft. Well I have pictures showing the wheel without that center nut. So clearly not a 55 rear end. Never knew the 55 was the banjo style rear end!

thank you for being patient with me on this, still learning.

Posted on: 1/29 13:39:53
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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Joined:
12/4 13:08:14
From Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 37
This past weekend I was in town and got some work done between the other car work that was on the list to complete. Got power seat and lock relays removed, got the solenoids for the suspension removed, got the A/C lines removed, gas pedal and linkage removed and some other stuff off of the passenger fender.

Slowly moving along!

Posted on: 2/4 12:33:32
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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Joined:
2014/7/15 11:30
From Terrebonne, OR
Posts: 2000
If possible, can you please show some photos of the longer of the two oil filter lines from different angles? Iím trying to determine if the new one I have has gotten a slight extra bend there or if itís supposed to be that way.

Posted on: 2/4 14:02:16
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Quite a regular
Joined:
12/4 13:08:14
From Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 37
Quote:

PackardDon wrote:
If possible, can you please show some photos of the longer of the two oil filter lines from different angles? Iím trying to determine if the new one I have has gotten a slight extra bend there or if itís supposed to be that way.


Hey PackardDon,

what oil filter lines are you talking about? If its lines on the engine, I currently dont have the engine assembled. But if its something on the firewall or fenders, I may have some pictures.

Posted on: 2/6 5:19:04
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Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15925
I will start by posting a factory photo with a partial view of what Don is asking about. A good photo and approximate length of the bare unconnected lines would answer many questions on exactly how Packard rerouted the filter lines. Biggest question is did the supply line go in front of or behind the thermostat housing and where does it bend to clear or turn upward to get to the filter port.

Most engines have the filter on the left with a short supply line that runs straight back and up but when the factory AC compressor is mounted the oil filter moves from the side of the left head on the engine to the right side of engine and is positioned forward and lower than the original location. It bolts onto the end of the compressor bracket. The question is the shape and where the new longer oil supply line is routed from the oil supply port on the front of the left head to get to the new input fitting location on the rear side of the filter canister. The return line also is different and looks to be just a short curved piece that goes into a 90 degree fitting on top of the block but if you have photos of that one as well it would help answer future questions.

Attach file:



jpg  AC042.jpg (649.43 KB)
209_5e3c2ed303ce1.jpg 1275X1632 px

Posted on: 2/6 7:20:53
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Howard
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