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Board index » All Posts (DavidPackard)




Re: BigKev
#1
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DavidPackard
I do apologize . . . my ’54 was off-site, and I couldn’t photograph until today. Seems like you’ve completed the driver’s side already, so this is pretty much academic at this point.
With respect to the door weather strip ‘flap’, I believe you’re correct in placing the rubber ‘on top’ of the screw. Based on your photo in post #2467 versus my attached photo, along with Jerome’s, the OEM seal may have started with a slightly different cross section in that area, but then again I’m looking at a seal that has had a good number of years of ‘forming’ pressure.

Attach file:



jpg  WeatherSeal002.jpg (434.38 KB)
34287_6174969517d3a.jpg 3024X4032 px

Posted on: Yesterday 18:11
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Re: 51 Packard 250 Headlights are dim
#2
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DavidPackard
51Pack;

I would also start with ensuring the head light grounds are in good shape as HH56 mentioned, and then a quick check of the system voltage at the battery posts as Ross suggested . . . finally measuring the voltage at the terminal block would be worthwhile. If anything looks ‘crusty’ then disassemble, clean, and re-assemble . . . ultimately the terminals must be electrically clean, which starts with being physically clean.

While not plagued with ‘dull’ head lights, I did wire my ’48 headlights with a system quite similar to the circuit HH56 posted. The only exception was the use of two circuit breakers, with separated feeds to the #30 pole of the relays. The original problem was degradation of the headlight switch circuit breaker which resulted in me driving down the road with the lights coming on, followed by the lights going off, and then coming back on again . . . not good driving at night with no headlights. The OEM breaker was replaced prior to building the relay system, but I must admit I changed the toe switch, as Tim Cole suggested for good measure. Since I didn’t want to install another system that had the same single point of failure as the OEM circuit, my modification was to ‘double-up’ on the circuit breakers. If something runs amiss my bet is it won’t happen to both circuits at the same time, and I can ‘limp’ home . . . with some amount of lighting.

The circuit breakers are 30A, which is just about twice the current needed for the head lights (that’s quite normal for the circuit breaker to be twice the running load). The OEM breaker is mounted under the dash, and is therefore subject to temperature pretty much the same as the driver & passengers. The new under hood circuit breakers are subject to temperatures quite a bit higher. There will be a degradation of the ’trip current’ at the higher thermal environment, so the 30A rating might not be absolutely correct at the higher temperatures, and if the components are operating at typical thermostat settings the maximum current rating could be 50% of the rated value. Just be mindful of where the relays are mounted if you decide to install relays. Mine are located on the inner fender, just about the same location that HH56 selected. In my ’48 they’re mounted above the battery where the OEM wiring harness is routed . . . . that would be just aft of the OEM terminal strip, which also minimizes the total length of wire.

The attached file has further explanation.

By the way Halogen lights come in several different wattages, with some matching the OEM load rating (that’s a good thing). If the lights you installed have a larger wattage rating than the original head lights, then I would recommend a relay system . . . before the OEM light switch lets you down.

dp

Attach file:


pdf HeadLightRelay002.pdf Size: 102.43 KB; Hits: 3

Posted on: 10/5 22:31
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Re: 1940 Turn Signal Wiring Diagram
#3
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DavidPackard
I forgot to add a sentence about front parking lights . . . if the car never had turn signals from the factory the front lights are not likely dual filament, therefore they need to be managed much like the stop lights. That is the turn signal shares a single filament with another function. Gar your wire count might be as high as 8 to cover the front bulbs. If we call the parking input power as circuit 8, then 8 & 4, and 8 & 5 will be common with the signal switch centered. With the switch in the right turn position then 2 & 4 are common, and 8 & 5 remain common.

Posted on: 10/3 19:03
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Re: 1940 Turn Signal Wiring Diagram
#4
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DavidPackard
Gar;
Because the pilot lamp is mounted inside the flasher housing, you should have 7 wires there.
They are:
1. Stop light power input
2. Flasher power input In the photo looks like either the Red or Black wires
3. Flasher pilot lamp input In the photo looks like either the Red or Black wires
4. Right front lamp output
5. Left front lamp output
6. Right rear lamp output
7. Left rear lamp output

The remaining brown wire in the 3 prong flasher socket should be perhaps hot always, or hot with ignition key on. Assuming you find power at the brown prong I would jumper power to the black prong. Stick a fuse in the jumper just in-case. If the indicating lamps turn ON then the black wire is the pilot lamp input, however if the lamps do not come on then place the turn signal switch into a ‘turning’ position and retry jumping brown to black. Assuming the lamps are good then one of the lamps should light, and you just confirmed the black wire is the pilot input. If this fails then you will have to repeat the process with the red wire, but I’m expecting the black to be the pilot and the red the load side of the flasher, that is, the flasher power input into the flasher switch.

The next step is to find the brake light circuit. One of the wires should be hot only when the brakes are applied. You can trace the circuit from the brake light switch to the turn signal switch. Since wire 1 & 6, and 1 & 7 are common finding the brake light input power wire is best done by tracing the wire itself.

The only wires left are going to the 4 corners of the car. One at a time we want to apply power and confirm which light is ON.

Did I mention you’re writing all of this down, because once you’ve identified all 7 wires that’s your homemade wiring diagram.

See thread ‘1956 Clipper Turn Signal’ posting #6. The attached diagram is for the Packard turn signal switch (it should be electrically identical to yours), but because the pilot lamps are dash mounted the Packard switch is a 6 wire design.

dp

Posted on: 10/3 17:36
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Re: coil on plug
#5
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DavidPackard
A low tension ignition system was developed for piston power aircraft years ago. See article

https://www.aircraftsystemstech.com/p/ ... -system-high-tension.html

The only parts we don't have access to are the 'brushed' distributor cap, and a low tension coil.

Typically low tension systems are only needed at high altitude . . . not sea level, so not sure there would be an automotive application to forage for parts.

dp

Posted on: 10/1 12:10
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Re: 1956 Clipper Turn signal flasher
#6
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DavidPackard
Howard; I think the diagram is OK.

Assuming the pilot and load are synchronized, then let’s put the right turn signal ON and analyze the circuit when the Orange wire is ‘hot’. Both the Orange and Pink are ‘hot’ resulting in zero voltage drop across the left indicator . . . that is when the right turn signal is ON, the left indicator is not producing light. That seems correct so far.

With the Pink wire still ‘hot’ the right indicator will be powered, and have a ground path through the Left turn signal bulb. Since incandescent bulbs have less resistance when cold this ground path is sufficient to provide enough voltage drop across the right indicator to produce light. Seems that’s correct also.

dp

Posted on: 9/23 14:10
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Re: trunk upholstery kit
#7
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DavidPackard
JWL’s information is consistent with the perception/assumption that the senior car trunks were finished with up-graded materials, that is, carpet v. rubber mat. I must admit my rubber mat assumption may have been a figment of my imagination knowing the ’48 Eight front mat material and GM’s use of rubber mats a few years later in their ‘lesser’ product lines. By the time I bought my ’48 Deluxe the trunk had been media blasted, repainted low gloss black, and dark gray/black thin trunk carpeting glued in . . . over every surface, save the spare wheel well. I’m not sure that I’ve ever seen original 22-23 series trunk finishes. The only ‘stuff’ left in my ’54 trunk was the three piece ‘tar paper’ first layer for the flat surface, two ‘ropes’, a flattened jack box playing the role of a trunk mat, and a lot of flocking lying about.

I guess bear should follow bkazmer’s advice of flocking the surfaces that are not the ‘floor’, and HH56’s advice on a center mat. I know when I looked real close to the flocking on my ’54 the material was not a single color, more of a blend, but I’m not sure if ’48 flocking was a single color material. I bet after a few years the color of the adhesive was obvious. If flocking is not on the horizon the finish should present with almost no ‘shine’, quite subdued.

From the parts catalog there’s an impression that the trunk color did not vary with paint code . . . other than the incidental over spray, so the flocking and mat may have been from the same family, but not necessarily matching colors. Given the color of my fender ‘ropes’, and the flock residue the ’54 trunk finishes likely presented with a brown/tan hue in that time period, which is quite consistent with HH56’s information that ’51 cars had the same color presentation. The observation made by bkazmer is the ’48 – ’50 cars likely presented as a gray hue.

Bear, if you jump to page 44 in KPack’s 1954 Panama project blog you will see various ‘non-OEM’ trunk presentations. My experience is the in-door / out-door carpet from Home Depot would need a lot of help to bend around tight radii, and if you were successful, outside bends would expose a ‘different’ texture. Thinner non-pile material does not have that restriction.

Another project blog to look at is Joe’s ’49 Club Sedan around page 8, where Joe shared his idea/method to add upholstery elements to the trunk lid. I shamelessly stole that one, but did not back the material and just glued the magnets to the carpet and allowed the fabric fit the curved contour of the lid. I also use magnets to hold the fender upholstery . . . very little glue.

I think the bottom line is that your quest to find a truck refinishing kit may not be successful, but you can get real close to OEM standards by buying the materials individually, but you can equally go crazy back there.

Posted on: 9/19 14:01
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Re: trunk upholstery kit
#8
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DavidPackard
HH56, I did get a bit confused between bear’s topic title and the use of the word ‘kit’ in the text, and if that’s the only thing that confuses me today I’m good with that. I thought the Eight Deluxe trunk finish was a single rubber mat . . . just something to cover the steel and protect the luggage, but I must admit I might be influenced by the front mat used in the Eight. I did notice two items in the parts catalog; one, the Custom used a different part number trunk mat, likely an upgrade to something closer to carpet, and two, Club Sedans used two separate part numbers labeled left and right. OK, confusion is setting in again. I’m looking at group 31.1502 & 31.1503.

Posted on: 9/18 22:55
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Re: trunk upholstery kit
#9
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DavidPackard
I’m assuming bear’s question was for an upholstery ‘kit’ for the seats, door panels, and carpet . . . not necessarily limited to trunk finishes.
dp

Posted on: 9/18 20:17
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#10
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DavidPackard
Kevin;

As you said, there’s only the hose and bleeder screw on that side of the backing plate. As a minimum those should be checked, but for completeness, now that the car has a few miles on it, I would also lay a wrench on the bolts that hold the cylinder to the backing plate.

dp

Posted on: 9/9 17:56
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