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Board index » All Posts (D-train)




Fibrated grease, are you guys still using it or is it obsolete?
#21
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D-train
Hi guys,

The manual for some of these cars require/state fibrated grease. Are you guys still using that (if it can be found) or just using a good hi temp disk brake grease, along with the leather grease seals.

Thanks,

Mark

Posted on: 2014/11/15 0:00
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Re: Hardening V8 retainers: Any metalurgists out there?
#22
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D-train
I've never had a physics or engineering class... What does the hardening do to the "brittleness" of a object? But I thought that the harder you make an object, the less flexible it becomes?

I assume that spring retainers and seats wouldn't matter, and rotors not so much. ...but wouldn't a brake drum expand a little?

Sorry for the question. ...just looking to learn something.

Mark

Posted on: 2014/10/7 15:43
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Re: 1947 2106 Gasoline and Oil Recommendations
#23
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D-train
Ok, I will probably sound ignorant/uneducated... But just a couple of things that I have thought/understood along the way...

In researching what oil to use in my 23rd series, one of the factory manuals/info cited 50 weight. ...not taking the multi/winter weight into account, I would have thought that sticking to that 50 weight would be the best move as that heavier weight had the engine's larger tollerances in mind, compared to more modern-day tighter tolerances. Also, the camshaft as it's lobes receive their lubrication from leakdown of the lifters, don't they? I would think that the heavier weight oil wouldn't "flow off" as easily.

I know that O-D stated using a detergent oil, I have always seen that stated as long as that has been used in the engine most of it's life. ...because switching to a detergent oil after years of non-detergent may loosen up and circulate sludge that would otherwise remain in place in the engine.

Like I said, I was going to stick to a 10w or 20w/50 weight detergent in my newly rebuilt 327cu. I won't even get into the zinc discussion.

I'm just asking, not questioning anyone's knowledge.

Thanks,

Mark

Posted on: 2014/9/26 13:33
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Re: Connecting Oil Pressure Line
#24
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D-train
A little heat on the block could aid in loosening it also.

Not to hijack but a question... My newly rebuilt engine is on a stand. I was trying to figure out how to "prelube" pre-oil the engine before startup. I figured that I would tap into one of these ports and run some sort of pressure oiler. What can I use to pressure oil it. ...and can I tab into these ports.

Thanks,

Mark

Posted on: 2014/9/12 20:56
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Re: Docs for a newly purchased '49 2301 in 1949..
#25
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D-train
...and his trade-in receipt.

Attach file:



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Posted on: 2014/8/15 15:39
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Re: Docs for a newly purchased '49 2301 in 1949..
#26
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D-train
The back of invoice with some add-ons...

Attach file:



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Posted on: 2014/8/15 15:38
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Docs for a newly purchased '49 2301 in 1949..
#27
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D-train
Hi all,

I thought that some may be interested in seeing some old documentation...

Background-In 1949, my grandfather traded in his 1939 Packard Sedan (purchased from his father) for his first new car. ...a '49 2301 in Coronet Blue, from Opas & Son dealership in Chicago Illinois. Strangely, the "Paid" stamp shows 1948.


The car still sits in my grandparents garage waiting for a restoration. It hasn't run since 1958, as the City of Chicago vehicle sticker suggests. My grandparents have passed.

Here is his invoice.

Thanks,

Mark

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Posted on: 2014/8/15 15:36
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Re: Restorers, hobbyists, what are you using in your parts cleaner and...
#28
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D-train
Yes, after I clean all of the grease off, I will be sandblasting it. I just have to figure out where, as I have the pressure blaster, but no "open outdoor space" to do it.

I've been actually using a couple of methods for rust removal:
1.)Sandblasting (in a cabinet) works as one would expect.
2.)Evapo-rust works well and leaves a nice protective coating to prevent rust until paint.
3.)Vinegar-Leaves alot of flash rust very quickly before rinsing. I have found Eastwood's After Blast is better.
4.)Eastwood After-Blast stops flash rust after blasting and washing. ...but you need to dry it off well, or else a white phosphoric "salt" tends to appear.
3.)Tumbler-I have only used it once with marginal results, but will try again.
4.)Electrolosis-I haven't tried it yet, but plan to.

I have also tried the engine degreasers to clean, but they need the heat. A search of the internet showed guys used everything from straight cleaners (Super Kleen, Simple Green & Purple Power). The concensus was Simple Green and Purple Power contained a 2-Buto "something or other" which helps to work without heat. I have found the Super Kleen doesn't seem to break down the greese. It seems to "suspend" it in the water. So I will try those two next. Some guys are using straight solvent or even diesel in there cleaners.

I guess that's half of the fun of this, is trying the different methods out. ...then comes the home plating from Caswell.

Sorry for the long response.

Mark

Posted on: 2014/6/30 9:34
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Restorers, hobbyists, what are you using in your parts cleaner and...
#29
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D-train
Hi Everyone,

I had started on my restoration last summer. So every weekend it was dis-assembly cleaning, rust removal and painting. Now comes cleaning the front half of the frame to paint it.

I have been using Castrol Super Clean in my parts cleaner. It calls for an 8:1 mix. It is marginal and doesn't really cut the grease. All of the grease just sticks to the brush. Well as I started scrubbing my frame, this stuff definitely isn't cutting it. I know that hot water or steam would really work miracles... I'm too far away from the house to bring that in.

So, I'd like to know what everyone else uses for washing parts and the frame/undercarriage.

Thanks,

Mark

Posted on: 2014/6/29 23:19
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Re: 22nd series center link service/rebuild...
#30
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D-train
I didn't look closely... But how does that come off of the center link??? Is there a cap on there that needs to come off that covers the bolt? Is that part considered an "inner tie rod"? I don't see one listed on a vendor's site. I assume that I will need to hunt down a straighter replacement off of a junker?

Thanks,

Mark

Posted on: 2014/5/27 11:52
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