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Board index » All Posts (tsherry)




Re: Stay warm out there....
#21
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tsherry
We were something like minus 5 last night with minus 30 wind chills.

Not tearing into the '47 engine until things warm up a bit...or, a lot.

I do have a 110,000 BTU kerosene heater out there, but I'm not interested in heating it for hours at eight bucks a gallon. Heat up very cold stuff = condensation = corrosion.

I think I'll just have another Irish whisky, heavy on the Irish.

We're supposed to be in the 30's and low 40's by the middle of next week, and then it drops out again. So the 15" of snow will melt and re-freeze.

Swell.

Posted on: 12/23 15:52
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Re: BigKev's 1937 115-C Convertible Coupe
#22
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tsherry
My '37 115c has on each side a hunk of "S" shaped metal with some vinyl on it to hold the hood panels. They were installed over the rods, seem to work OK but obviously not stock.

Posted on: 12/21 21:59
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Re: 1941 Packard 160
#23
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tsherry
I bought some B78/13's that year, from Sears, for my 1965 Falcon sedan....

Posted on: 12/14 23:02
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Re: 47 Water Pump Troubleshooting
#24
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tsherry
I believe that is part of the retaining clip for the main shaft. I tried removing mine and it snapped of clean.

The procedure for rebuilding the pump includes (as I recall) pulling the flange for the fan off the front, removing that clip, and then pressing the shaft from back to front out of the pump housing. If that clip cannot be removed I do not believe you can rebuild the pump without destroying the shaft (instead of just seals and bearing you'd need the shaft, too).

Posted on: 12/3 22:28
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Re: 1937 282 exhaust and intake
#25
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tsherry
I used the same process JWL, worked fine for my 115c.

Posted on: 12/1 22:29
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Re: What can I expect in an an abused 245-6?
#26
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tsherry
I'll pull the valve covers when it's not 9º outside and 30º in the shop...

Posted on: 2022/11/28 23:38
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What can I expect in an an abused 245-6?
#27
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tsherry
I'm planning on installing a '47 245 in my '40 (replacing it's very tired 245). The '47 engine was running prior to being pulled. Compression was good, the engine did not make any noticeable knocking or noise while running (I saw a video of each) and miraculously, the prior owners did the 'nickel test', with a nickel balanced on edge at idle. Rock steady.

Getting ready for a cosmetic refresh (paint, gaskets, carb and fuel pump rebuild, etc.) I pulled the starter, fuel pump, manifolds off, and then pulled the pan to clean it (1/4 to 3/8" of crap on the outside of the pan). The pan had obviously not been pulled in a Very Long Time.

Inside the pan, I found very dirty, half-jellied oil, the consistency of tomato aspic. In the bellhousing, the remains of the clutch lining in large hunks, 4" long but very thin. Probably the reason the engine/trans was switched to a SBC Turbo 400, and why I was able to pick it up.

Cleaned the inside of the pan with putty knives to get most of the goo out, then a liberal application of sawdust, rubbed by hand to remove anything remaining still "wet", then another scrape, then scrubbed with toothbrushes and more sawdust.No metal noted, but it was too thick to really make out much in any regard.

Outside, putty knives and a combo chisel and rasp to get it clean. Then a wire brush attachment on my drill, which when I'd cleaned off the crap, revealed two small pinholes in the pan from rust-through.

The oil pickup screen was a disaster.

Removed the cotter pin, pulled that off, removed the outer cover from the intake and found 90% of the screen plugged. Scrubbed it for awhile, eventually revealing that it was not in fact a black-painted element, but was actually bare metal, coated with black crud. It's soaking in a degreaser for Several Days Ahead.

Given what little I know about the engine, what do you think I should be looking at next?

The engine / bellhousing are still attached and suspended on an engine stand and cherry picker. Next step after cleaning and reinstalling the oil screen will be to reinstall the pan, remove the burned-out clutch, bellhousing and flywheel, and then get it on the engine stand properly. Then flip it over and see what the bottom end looks like.

I've worked on OHC engines since I learned to drive in '76; I have an idea of what I'd find on a tired and abused engine of that type....but what additional info on a Packard?

Thanks for any assistance--

Tom

Posted on: 2022/11/27 21:34
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Re: 1941 Runs rough when warm
#28
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tsherry
This is a wild longshot, but have the rubber fuel lines been replaced? Old lines rot from the inside out, and the inner part of the line can suck closed under prolonged suction, causing a stumble or stall on acceleration. Shutting off the engine and ceasing suction allows fuel to flow again, but is repeatable. I've had this happen on several of my '60's Fords and my '37 115c. Lines looked fine on the outside, but were soft inside and had separated from the nylon cord centered in the cross section of the line.

Posted on: 2022/11/25 15:44
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Re: Whats this worth 1935 Packard
#29
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tsherry
In my world that's a 10K car, tops. That'll offend the seller, but figures don't lie.

Posted on: 2022/11/25 15:40
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Re: 1941 Clipper restoration
#30
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tsherry
Nice work. That engine looks beautiful.

I had the chance a few years ago to buy a '41 Clipper that had been donated to a charity that also runs a used car lot (Union Gospel Mission Motors, Spokane). Running car, nice interior and original paint, good chrome. Had a 6v electric fuel pump added, brakes were not working, Optima battery was dead, water pump was leaking. Floors were pretty well rotted out though. Originally listed for 10.5K; gradually over about a year dropped to $6500 where it sold, either for that or perhaps less. That body style was not one I was all that interested in, and a couple months later bought my '37 115C. That Clipper though, would have been a nice project.

Posted on: 2022/11/24 15:56
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