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Board index » All Posts (beharpst)




Re: Oil Pan drain plug
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BH
Welcome aboard Randy, and thanks for updating us on your problem.

It's interesting to know that the pan has a "bung" plate that is spot-welded in place, lending itself to a transplant. Yet, I suspect that it wouldn't be too hard to fab a new one if a donor wasn't available. Also, have you any thought about "sweating" some solder (after welding) to make the seam leak-proof or is that not necessary?

Helicoils have their place, but I suspect this will be a better fix in the long-run.

Don't worry about being long-winded in your posts, as this is the kind of good, detailed information that we need to archive for future reference. (A forum is about more than just one-on-one discussion.) Also, know that you can break your post into paragraphs as you would with any word processor, and this forum will handle it, without need for any special coding on your part.

Posted on: 2007/1/6 0:26
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Re: 1955 & 1956 Packard Side Marker Lights
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BH
Eric -

You are almost 100% correct. For '56 the running/courtesy light lens was changed (though not entirely opaque) to a translucent white material. But, I knew what you meant.

Now, you might be interested to know that I have a pair of lenses which were cast in a transparent amber sort of color.

I always figured that they were some hobbyist's attempt at repro of the clear '55 lens that had gone wrong - that is, until I learned that there were some ribbed stainless trim pieces done in a gold-tone finish. Although I have never seen any documentation on such trim, a few of those pieces have turned up on eBay - here and for a pretty good buck. Since then, I have wondered if these amber lenses, since the run right in the middel of the paths of the ribbed stainless, might have been part of that rare "gold package".

Posted on: 2007/1/4 8:34
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Re: 1955 & 1956 Packard Side Marker Lights
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BH
You might be interested to know that the lights on the side of the 1955-56 Senior Packards (rear door on sedan, rear fender on coupe) are referred to as "courtesy lights" in the parts books - more intended to illuminate entry/egress for front seat passengers.

There was, however, a second bulb in each of those lights that came on with the "parking" lights, but I don't find them to be of that much benefit as a side marker, because they lack any reflex as found on true side marker lights that were implemented as mandatory equipement in 1968 (at least here in the US).

What is more "telling" are the Scotchlight hex decals, offered as a Packard-supplied dealer accessory for wheel covers of earlier Series, that I applied and trimmed down for my Senior cars. When not illuminated at night, the casual observer would never know it wasn't the standard painted center, but a reflective decal.

I have a gut feeling that "side marker" lights similar those on the 55th-56th Series were used prior to 1955, but I have not found an concrete example.

It also seems to me that 1949-50 Pontiac had a turn signal lens that followed the curve of the front fender, though not reaching around nearly so far as that of the 1955-56 Packards.

Posted on: 2007/1/4 0:19
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Re: Carter Carburetor
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BH
Any of the major Packard parts vendors should have a repro kit (used to come in a plain white box), but I believe they all get them from Daytona Parts Company.

I would warn you, however, that I once purchased such a kit from a third-party vendor at Fall Hershey for shelf stock and for CASH, but when I went to use the kit, years later, I found parts missing. I could see this without even opening the sealed poly bag, but also noticed the letters "DPC" on the paperwork, which I have seen on kits I purchased direct from Daytona. I really couldn't go back on the vendor, but e-mailed Daytona and got NO response.

I would recommend that whomever you purchase the kit from, check it out as carefully as you can, without opening any sealed, yet transparent packaging, and call them on it immediately if you see a problem. If they don't make it right, let us all know about it HERE.

Perhaps others will have some additional insight for your specific carb model.

Posted on: 2007/1/1 17:00
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Re: Carter Carburetor
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BH
One thing my dad handed me when I rebuilt my first carb was a fiberglass tray - like what you used to see in cafeteria-style dining. Though otherwise completely flat, the tray had an upturned edge that kept the little parts (and small tools) from rolling off the table and onto the floor (or worse yet down the drain!). I suppose an old cookie sheet would do, but the bright yellow color of the fiberglass tray also made it easy to spot small parts.

Take the carb apart carefully - a little penetrating oil might be needed for stubborn components. Some parts are brass, which is a soft material - easy to strip-out a thread or a slot.

Soaking the carb parts, after diassembly, is a good idea, but I make it a point not to soak some of the delicate parts, the float(s), or the choke stat and cover. Just clean those off with an aerosol carb cleaner.

Also, because the soaking solution and most aerosol cleaners for carbs are acidic, my dad taught me to rinse the parts off with hot water, after they come oout of their bath - then blow out all pasages and dry with compressed air.

Get a new (not NOS) carb kit, stick with the shop manual instructions (especially and tightening sequence druing reassembly), and you'll do fine. Unlike carbs of later decades, most settings can be made with a common set of feeler and wire gauges.

BTW, I am going to pull the collection of sheets on Carter carbs for Packard applications, that my dad kept in his toolbox (years ago as a mechanic in a Packard agency), and scan them for the site. I suspect it will contain one sheet that applies to your carb.

Posted on: 2007/1/1 10:32
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Re: Need info on 55 Clipper
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BH
Welcome, John -

I think you'll find this Forum to your liking as well, but keep in mind that we're just getting started here. Several users from the Packard Club and AACA Packard Forums have chimed-in and I expect more to come.

The Twin Ultramatic is considered a problem by some only because it is so much different than other automatics. A good place to start is with a download of the three-volume set on Ultramatics - and be sure to follow the bulletins for adjustments.

You should also take a look at updates and services that Peter Fitch has to offer at:

http://www.ultramaticdynamics.com/

Any weakness in clutch packs have been addressed by the use of more modern material than what was available 50 years ago. BTW, a fellow in Kansas recently resurrected a '56 Patrician from a field that had been fitted years ago with a '55 Twin Ultra, and with nothing more than a fluid change or two, it is a reliable daily driver.

The Twin and Gear Start versions of the Ultramatic only had two-speed forward speeds, but with automatic upshift from Low to High gear. The torque characteristics of the Packard V8 and torque multiplication of the converter are so good that you can actually start out in High gear - unless you are on a hill (which would benefit from use of Low gear).

The torque converters in all Ultramtics also feature a Direct Drive clutch; the Big Three wouldn't have a lock-up converter until a couple of decades later. The novice misinterprets the engagement of that clutch as a shift into third gear, when there is no such thing - not needed.

Thanks for the pic of your car (looks pretty solid), but I can't tell whether it's a Super Panama or Custom Constellation from this angle. Your '55 Clipper has a 352-cid motor, but you need to know the first four digits of serial number to find out more.

Detailed specifications on your car can be found in the shop manual, which is now available for download, but I am working on some specs and general model info on the '55 and '56 cars for display at this site in the very near future.

You should join the Packard V8 Club, too (also FREE):

http://www.1956packardpanther.com/PV8C_Index.html

They have some interesting info on performance, but available to registered members only.

Hope this helps. Come back with more specific questions as they crop up, and someone here will have an asnwer, but be patient for the reply.

Posted on: 2006/12/28 0:13
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Re: Double Flared Tubing
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BH
I used to think stainless was the way to go, but I have to agree with Keith about avoiding stainless steel lines. Getting stainless to seal against cast iron seems to pose a problem.

Bending your own lines is not that hard, with the right tools, but be sure to get a good quality flare tool and make a couple of test flares to confirm that it works properly. I have one that the dies didn't quite line up perfectly, and I freqeuntly got leaky connection as a result.

Getting back to materials, if you use DOT 5 (silcone-based) fluid, you minimize the problem of moisture being drawn into the system and causing the steel lines to rust form the inside out.

However, do NOT use DOT 5 in any ABS brake system.

Also, NEVER use copper for brake lines.

Always use double-walled steel lines for hydraulic brake applications. Tubing with polyvinyl fluoride coating is now available, but I would avoid that, too, as the coating tends to crack at bends, holding moisture, which leads to rust. I am fine with the traditional zinc-plated stuff, but have used some spiral shield (as found on modern cars) to prevent road rash in highly vulnerable areas.

You should be able to get 25-foot coils of double-walled steel tubing from any reputable parts store. The stuff sold in coils seem easier to bend and flare than the pre-flared straight pieces that are available in assorted lengths. If you use the latter, be sure to check with the store to make sure you get the rigth type (45-degree double upset) for your car.

Some people use copper for non-hydraulic lines and some even paint it with alumminum-colored paint. I just use steel for everything.

Posted on: 2006/12/19 20:15
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Re: Double Flared Tubing
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BH
All of the brake lines that I've replaced on my '55-'56 Packards had the 45-degree double upset flares.

I'm not sure about the steel fuel and vacuum lines as I haven't made of those yet, but do know the tube for the choke heat pipe is swedged for a slip fit the exhaust crossover fitting.

Not to drift off-topic, but I've attached a pic of a great tool to help form the tubing without kinking.

This is K-D Tool's #2189 tubing bender, but the one I have is from Plews - looks identical, but has red vinyl-coated handles. I picked it up from a "tool trailer" at a swap meet several years ago; perhaps Plews sold out on this one to K-D. To date, this bender has done everything I needed - except for a very tight 90-degree bends, close to the fitting, on a later model car.

Attach file:



jpg  (4.78 KB)
103_45d2a17d06dbe.jpg 300X167 px

Posted on: 2006/12/18 19:06
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Re: Welcome - V-8 Roll Call
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BH
Greetings 55_Clipper!

While this online community is still getting warmed up and waiting to hear more answers to the roll call, newcomers and old friends alike should feel free to start a "NEW TOPIC" on any questions they may have. One of us will reply - as time permits.

Posted on: 2006/12/8 20:01
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Re: Welcome - V-8 Roll Call
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BH
Oops!

When I first signed on at the AACA Forums, they limited avatar uploads to an 80x80-pixel image, and that's what I had suggested to BigKev. While the AACA site has apparently changed to allow for larger images, they are then resized, "on the fly", to an 80x80 display, which often results in a grainy appearance.

I checked with BigKev about this and he was able to meet you halfway, increasing the maximum size to 120x120. Avatar images are a nice way to personalize your post and make you more recognizable to viewers, but I can't see wasting message body space on anything larger for this purpose.

If you can resize your avatar image to no more than 120-pixels in the largest dimension, it'll fly now.

Welcome aboard, all! Hope to hear from more good people.

Posted on: 2006/12/6 19:45
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