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Board index » All Posts (DavidPackard)




Re: Timeing a Clipper Deluxe without a timeing light
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DavidPackard
'Back in the day' we would static time reciprocating helicopter engines by slipping a piece to cellophane paper between the magneto points and slowly rotate the engine toward TDC. When the paper became somewhat loose we would check if the timing marks were aligned. These were 'un-excited' magnetos with impulse couplings, so the test light technique would not work (no voltage unless the magneto was spinning). The same 'super thin feeler gauge' technique was used on various rigging points of the controls. Since there was no stigma attached to smoking back then the supply of cellophane paper was somewhat unlimited. The only limitation is that it will only work well if the points are smooth. Pits are OK, but the 'mountain peaks' had to go. If a test light is not available this alternate method is likely to work just fine. Detonation will let you know if the dynamic (static + centrifugal) advance has gone a step too far. Labored cranking is another symptom of excessive static advance. One of those two conditions will ultimately limit the amount of advance you can set the timing to.
dp

Posted on: 2017/4/23 15:58
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/4/22 23:12
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
I've got a short up-date on the difficulty I'm having with locking the driver's side door on my '48.

Just to review, the latch works fine, the outer handle opens the door, the inner handle opens the door, but neither the key nor the button will lock the door. The button will not 'stay down' and will just pop-up every time it is pushed down.

Yesterday I removed the key cylinder and connecting shaft . . . that did not change any of the symptoms. The only good news is that I have successfully reinstalled the cylinder lock without removing the door panel, or resorting to the long needle method (aka stabbing the door panel).

Before you throw out that old set of windshield blades take a look at them and if they have two pieces of metal (stainless steel) on either side of the rubber wiper element, then rip the mess apart and harvest the pieces of stainless. I used a small 'tie-wrap' to strap this wiper stiffener to the Packard lock shaft and used it to support and guide the shaft into the latch assembly. Once you think the shaft is engaged slowly remove the stiffener . . . there is just enough room . . . the cylinder needs to be slightly pointed upward to remove the stiffener. The 'tie-wrap' is now captured between the latch and cylinder. I must admit it took more than one try and in each case the 'tie-wrap' was still just where it was before I removed the stiffener. If the 'tie-wrap' is tight enough it does not seem to move when the stiffener is removed.

Now that I know it is not the cylinder lock my best guess is that the small leaf spring that holds the button in either the full-up or full-down position has lost some integrity. Without that holding feature the torsion spring on the button lever is winning the contest (see photo). It's just a guess at this point, but after seeing the wear the three pawls have caused on the ratchet side of the 'star' I think I should be looking for a serviceable replacement latch.

Given the photos that BDeB posted I would say the failure of that one feature of the 'master pawl' would render the latch inoperable (no way to move the other two). The problem I'm having is the broken part appears that it might have a tear in the metal that occurred during manufacture, and thus the failure mode with initiated by fatigue. Gross overload may not be necessary, only a whole bunch of cycles (door openings) and less that optimal lubrication. BDeB's photos also illustrate that the door latch was not considered a serviceable component, in that the tool of choice to disassemble would be a drill. My experience with latches leads me to believe the rivets were used simultaneously as fasteners, pivot points, and spacers.

I would like the opinion of this forum on the possibility of modifying the 'B' pillar before this type of failure occurs. I was thinking on what would be the necessary steps to unfasten the lock striker (with the door closed) and thus defeat the entire lock. I'm not entirely sure this would work on 8deluxe's club sedan but might help on a four door design. I was thinking of transferring the location of the four striker screw locations such that their location would be obvious then the rear door was open. Also I would modify each screw such that there was a lathe center located in the end of the screw. Then, if in the future, a failure was to happen the 'back side' of the screws could be drilled enough to compromise there shear area. I believe a 'left-handed' drill would be required because a 'right-handed' drill could 'un-screw' the fastener before the drill removed material.
I guess the question for 8deluxe is (assuming the door is still un-opened), whether the rear seat side trim panels could be removed for an inspection on the feasibility of drilling the striker screws?

dp

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Posted on: 2017/4/22 11:43
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Re: spark plug gap for 53 Clipper and jack position
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/4/17 17:29
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Re: Hard starting when Hot
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/4/11 10:58
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Re: My golden anniversary
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DavidPackard
With respect to the spark plug wire question, see thread titled "Spark Plug Wire Sets for 1952", posted by Tim49 on 06Feb17.

Posted on: 2017/4/4 9:21
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Re: Series 23 Deluxe steering wheel
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DavidPackard
A simple cost increase of about 4.1 % per year accounts for a doubling of the price over 17 years, so Fred should be prepared for a quote of $1000, or so, for the restoration of a deluxe steering wheel. The wear on my chrome spoke 'cuffs' suggests that the chrome was NOT restored in 2000.
The car has been 'headquartered' in Phoenix for the last 43 years ( could be more but the history I have is vague before '74 ). Since the restoration in 2000 the car has been driven about 35K miles and has been on 'cross-country' rallies several times. Donaldson's work is 'holding-up' quite well considering the Arizona environment, where rusting is a concept, and plastic degradation is inevitable.

Fred, please keep us 'up to speed' on the cost estimates you might receive.

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/2 13:34
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
Thank you Howard.
Since the key cylinder does move the button would you say at this point a complete 'tang' failure should be considered a lower probability? Your insight is well taken however; the 'tang' could be worn or slightly bent. Since receiving your message I've tried to rotate the key and push the button simultaneously . . . no difference. That was a combination that was not tried initially. Before I had the cases button only, and key only. Adding the case 'button and key' didn't add additional insight, but should have worked if wear or deflection was the only issue.

I went 'on-line' and quickly learned that right side latch assemblies are readily available . . . not so much for the left side. Right now I'm thinking about buying a right side latch to educate myself on the details of the design. There is a chance that the part I need is not a 'mirror image' component.

As in the case of the trunk latch are we dealing with another part made by the Swiss company?

I too would be reluctant to stab my door panel. From your pictures a long thin needle would be ideal, but as long as the needle was about an inch longer than the lock cylinder is should work. I'm not constrained by the labor hour issue the dealership may have had to contend with, so I would be inclined to remove the door panel.

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/2 12:50
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Re: Series 23 Deluxe steering wheel
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DavidPackard
Here is what I believe is a '48 restored deluxe steering wheel. A receipt I got with the purchase of the car indicates that JB Donaldson (Phoenix AZ) did the restoration. The bill is dated 11Apr00, with a cost around $500, since that's 17 years ago I suspect at bit of cost escalation should be expected.

I have other views, with file sizes that would be a challenge to post . . . I can PM those.

dp

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Posted on: 2017/4/2 12:03
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/4/1 22:50
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