Hello and welcome to Packard Motor Car Information! If you're new here, please register for a free account.  
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Who is Online
52 user(s) are online (33 user(s) are browsing Forums)

Members: 0
Guests: 52

more...
Helping out...
PackardInfo is a free resource for Packard Owners that is completely supported by user donations. If you can help out, that would be great!

Donate via PayPal
Video Content
Visit PackardInfo.com YouTube Playlist

Donate via PayPal

Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (Owen_Dyneto)




Re: 48-54 OD Trans
#31
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
Thanks guys, I appreciate the correction.

Posted on: 5/26 13:56
 Top 


Re: 48-54 OD Trans
#32
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
I don't think so Don, I believe 1940 and maybe 1941 used the R-6.

Posted on: 5/26 12:49
 Top 


Re: parts
#33
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
Brake light switch is available from NAPA, SL-134. As I recall, about $15.

Posted on: 5/23 10:55
 Top 


Re: Shifting 1205
#34
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
If you're comfortable with double-clutching the 1st-to-2nd shift and are doing it well, it's an entirely acceptable practice, does no harm and no reason not to continue with that for as long as you wish.

For gearbox lube, I suggest following your owner's manual recommendation, SAE 140 or 160 for the summer, and if you use the car much in the winter, SAE 90 for the winter. Use a GL-1 gear oil which is essentially just a simple mineral gear oil plus a defoamer. It's also suitable for the steering gear box, preferably the heavier viscosity.

For the rear axle you must use a gear oil rated for hypoid gearing, often called a high pressure gear oil, GL-5 is a proper and popular choice. Though Packard recommended changing viscosity winter and summer, I've used a multi grade GL-5 SAE 85-140 for many decades in my '34 Eight with no issues.

Depending on what you know about your car's past history prior to the 4-year layup, you should consider a very thorough review of all the lubrication needs before accumulating any more miles on it. Draining and refilling the transmission and differential would be a good idea, and perhaps dropping the oil pan for a good cleaning. For your Bijur chassis lubricator, use SAE-50 motor oil. Only a handful of grease fittings, 2 on the king pins, 2 on the tie rod, 2 on the drag link, the driveshaft spline and perhaps the universal joints if they are modern replacements. And there may be one on the pulley that supports the cable from the power brake booster. Wheel bearings and brake cables should be on the list as well, also the shock absorbers (hydraulic fluid). Again, all dependent on what you know about the care the car received in it's recent past.

Posted on: 5/23 10:45
 Top 


Re: PackardDon
#35
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
Don, for 1956 there are 3 iterations of the A pillar jamb with regard to the courtesy and side light switches:

Early - two openings, two switches.

Intermediate - two openings, one switch and the other opening blanked off.

Late- one opening, one switch.

This transition is documented in an older issue of "The Cormorant". 1956 Caribbeans are known in all three variations, I have some rough data on when the Caribbean transitions occurred.

Posted on: 5/22 20:43
 Top 


Re: Shifting 1205
#36
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
What you are experiencing in your first -to-second shift is NOT normal, your synchronizers are failing to function as designed. The reasons could include insufficient or improper viscosity gear oil, worn or improperly adjusted synchronizers, or a combination of both. What type and viscosity gear oil are you using?

The second-to-first gear change after a stop is not synchronized and your issue can be relieved to some extent by use of a heavier gear oil, though in part it is a nature of the design. Just shift to second for an instant to stop the gear spin, or just learn to wait the few seconds.

The synchronizers are adjustable for engagement via shims, how to measure synchronizer engagement and make the adjustments is covered in the 11th Series Service Letters which are available on this site. IIRC the second-to-third synchronizers can be adjusted with the trans in the car by adjusting shims at the rear bearing, I believe the other set requires removal of the trans. Based on my own experience with that gearbox, the first-to-second synchros seem to require adjustment sooner than the second-to-third set. I had mine adjusted at about 86,000 miles.

The 1932-1939 3-speed senior car transmission is an outstanding unit, sophisticated and very rugged, an absolute delight.

Posted on: 5/22 17:36
 Top 


Re: 31 rear axle nut torque
#37
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
It would be helpful if you told us the thread diameter and pitch, but 250 lb.-ft. or more would be typical for that type of assembly on a heavy car like a Packard. And the taper surfaces should be clean and dry, NO lube or never-seize type material. I went to about 280 on my 1934 Eight.

And recheck it after a few months of driving. It might be necessary to dress the washer a bit to reach alignment for the cotter pin.

Posted on: 5/21 18:37
 Top 


Re: Windshield Wipers on 1956 "400"
#38
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
Assuming the problem is the motor itself and not linkage or the control cable, Ficken Wiper Service does just excellent work. They can be contacted at www.wiperman.com or 631-587-3332.

Posted on: 5/20 8:10
 Top 


Re: 1934 Coupe For Sale
#39
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
This "whitewall versus blackwall" tire discussion began before the oldest of us were on the planet and will probably be continuing after the youngest of us is gone from it. But it's a nice, lively topic that many of us seem to enjoy and have firm opinions on.

For my own car, were it almost any color or combination of colors other than all black I almost certainly would have picked blackwall tires but as it is, I just felt black tires would be just too much black.

Attach file:



jpg  34 at Emerson sm.jpg (1,675.74 KB)
177_62853266648d0.jpg 1500X998 px

Posted on: 5/18 12:52
 Top 


Re: Numbers on my 1950 series 23
#40
Forum Ambassador
Forum Ambassador

Owen_Dyneto
John, the body serial or theft-proof numbers for the 23rd series 1950 cars ended somewhere just short of 999999, 997XXX is the highest known number (the 1951 models began at A00001). That places your car quite close to the end of the 23rd series production.

Yes, I'd very much like to have your full vehicle number and motor number if possible. Send via PM if you wish it kept confidential.

Dave

Posted on: 5/16 12:48
 Top 



TopTop
« 1 2 3 (4) 5 6 7 ... 1620 »



Search
Recent Photos
Photo of the Day
1933 Packard coupe, nine-tenths right side view, top raised
Recent Registry
Website Comments or Questions?? Click Here Copyright 2006-2021, PackardInfo.com All Rights Reserved