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Board index » All Posts (30sPackards)




Re: Howard's 47 Custom project
#31
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Thomas Wilcox
Howard,

Here is the cycle I have used successfully in the past:

1) Heat with a torch
2) Cool with penetrant
3) Heat with a torch
4) Cool very quickly with ice-water
5) Heat with a torch
6) Cool with penetrant, really soaking the part
7) Leave overnight
8) GOTO 1)

Yes, GOTO loops are evil, but sometimes necessary....

The ice water treatment provides a shock to the joint. It is more violent at the molecular level than any hammer. If you want more violence, use a dry ice/ETOH mix.


Cheers,

Tom

Posted on: 2013/5/10 12:52
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Carter WGD 728S help needed
#32
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Thomas Wilcox
I do not know what Canadian fuels are like, but if they contain alcohol, you may need to widen your jets a bit. An exhaust gas analyzer will help you to determine if this is necessary.

Posted on: 2013/5/7 14:12
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Gearshift repair question
#33
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Thomas Wilcox
Given the break pattern, I would say that is pot metal. As the name implies, pot metal could be a variety of different components. Perhaps this is why there is some residual magnetism.

Is the piece under stress? If not, then soldering might be a good idea. If under stress, how about brazing? It is a little cooler than welding.

Tom

Posted on: 2013/5/7 14:05
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: If you are under sixty, how did you get interested in Packards?
#34
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Thomas Wilcox
My first Packard was my mother's car. In 1956, my father bought her a 1934 Super Eight Coupe Roadster from our local pharmacist. He had a collection of Packards and old clocks. His wife wanted a new washing machine. It was either the clocks or the Packards. He chose to let go of the Packards. On Christmas day 1956 my mother got a 34 Packard*.

When she died in 1991, I became the caretaker of the car, and in 2002 I bought it from my father.

I remember many happy spring days working with my dad on the car to get it running and ready for the Minnesota driving season. My mother drove the car every chance she had; including pulling me and my friends from the hell called junior high to go see a movie.

The car has since been restored, but the gas pedal and shifter knob remain as they were.

Cheers,

Tom

p.s. I took over the car when I was 29. I'm 45ish now.

*He bought two super eight 34s, a sedan and the coupe roadster. He paid $3000 for both. He sold the sedan before Xmas.

Posted on: 2013/5/7 13:46
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Cleaning a wire wheel
#35
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Thomas Wilcox
Quote:

JW wrote:
Somewhat along these lines: How does one tune a wire wheel? Joe's comment about needing to replace some broken spokes jogged this question. It is a critical procedure on bicycle and motor cycle wheels, and must be important on car wheels too for running true and straight.

(o{}o)


Yes, they can be tuned, the same way as bike wheels. I have no idea who does it, but the wheels on my 34 were tuned (trued) sometime back in the 80s. Lilac bushes and streams can really screw up your front wheels...

Tom

Posted on: 2013/5/7 13:28
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: 1934 gasoline tank - how do it breath?
#36
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Thomas Wilcox
A photo of your tank would be helpful. If it is an original tank, then there should be a vent associated with the the pick-up/sender. It is very small, so filling these tanks takes patience (as Dave said).

If you are going to add an extra air relief, I suggest doing it at the top of the tank, and not modifying the tank itself.

Tom

Posted on: 2013/5/7 13:20
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Debi's 1953 Patrician
#37
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Thomas Wilcox
That looks like a lot of corrosion inside the engine, particularly in cylinders 1, 4, 5, 7 and 8. I will leave it to the experts here for the a complete diagnosis, but to me it looks like there were gaskets leaks that allowed coolant into the cylinders.

Again, at least to me, this engine looks like it needs at least an upper-end rebuild.


Tom

Posted on: 2013/5/7 13:10
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Mike's 53 Clipper
#38
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Thomas Wilcox
You can use silicone as a lubricant to help with installing the bushings. Not the spray, but the grease, which you should be able to get at any diving store. Or you can use ivory soap. You don't want to use any lubricant with hydrocarbons, as it will degrade the rubber.

Posted on: 2013/5/7 12:59
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Cleaning a wire wheel
#39
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Thomas Wilcox
Cotton (or other natural fabric) clothes line is also great for cleaning small spaces where you can run it back and forth. For extra 'frothiness' you can abrade the clothes line with emory cloth.

Posted on: 2013/4/30 11:52
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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Re: Cleaning a wire wheel
#40
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Thomas Wilcox
Quote:

Owen_Dyneto wrote:
There are special brushes available, kind of like old radiator brushes but with a wooden core instead of steel. But it my experience they are only marginally useful, I hate to clean wire wheels but when I do I use old tooth brushes. My wires (on my 34) are painted so I just use any conventional cleaner/wax, if yours are chromed you might have to do them twice, once with a chrome cleaner and then a wax. I use an old tee shirt with my finger inside, plan on about 1 hour per wheel, at least, to go a good job. To say that it's tedious is an understatement.

If anyone has a better way, I'm all ears.


I agree with Dave, it is tedious. I have found that when I want to do a deep clean it is easier to remove the wheel and submerge it in a large tank filled with dawn or ivory soap solution. I then crawl in and scrub. An inflatable 'kiddy' pool works fine.

Posted on: 2013/4/29 12:16
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Thomas Wilcox
34 Roadster, [url=https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/r
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