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Board index » All Posts (55Packardconv)




Re: Various CL Pickings
#31
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Kevin
Yes, that's the Executive side trim, and you can see the Senior series front clip with the Clipper tail lamps. Looks like a very pretty car!

Posted on: 2018/11/15 18:12
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Re: Packard Dealerships in Pasadena, CA.
#32
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Kevin
A quick Google search for "1936 Pasadena phone directory" yielded this page of Los Angeles area resources. If you scroll down to 1936, it looks like Ancestry.com has a 1936 Pasadena city directory as well as a South Pasadena directory behind their paywall. Those might yield some useful clues.

Posted on: 2018/11/11 11:51
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Re: Contemporary Caribbean Concept
#33
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Kevin
Make sure you leave enough room to package a Twin Ultra-Lectric Hybrid Drive system!

Posted on: 2018/10/12 16:21
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Re: How did the factory paint Carribeans in 1956
#34
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Kevin
Mike, if anyone would know when production of the 56th Series cars began, I'm sure it would be either Leeedy or Mr. Pushbutton.

ptv, whether Packard would have stayed afloat much longer on its own versus the fateful Studebaker-Packard combination is bound to be one of those eternal "what-if" questions that will be debated for as long as there are people interested in Packards. Not to hijack this thread, but as Mr. Pushbutton has pointed out many times before, the killer of the Independents was the cost and amortization of steel body tooling.

Studebaker's last body was introduced on its 1953 cars, and the same basic structure remained underneath the Lark until the bitter last stand in Hamilton, Ontario.

Kaiser-Frazer featured two different body designs plus a Henry J compact during its short lifespan, but it was bankrolled by the deep pockets of its namesake industrialist. Yet even he had his limits, as after 1951 the company never tooled a true convertible, a station wagon, or -- perhaps the biggest cardinal sin in the early 1950's -- a hardtop coupe. Their demise was also hastened by the lack of a V8.

Willys' last non-Jeep pasenger car body was introduced in 1952. After buying the company so he could move Kaiser production out of the oversized Willow Run factory complex. Henry J. Kaiser and his board of directors shut down all but the Jeep assembly lines in 1955. They did manage to squeeze a few more dollars of value out of their tooling investment by shipping the dies to their Argentinian arm, where the Kaiser Manhattan and the Willys Aero lived on under assumed identities. The Kaiser Carabela lasted until 1962, but the more compact Willys was moderately restyled and stayed competitive until 1971.

The full-sized Hudson was never rebodied after 1948, and it carried the Step-Down underpinnings to its grave. Hudson's management may have taken a Las Vegas style gamble with its future by spending precious cash on the compact Jet -- a move and a product that both still confuse people 60-some years later. Hudson was likely hoping to duplicate Nash's success with the Rambler, and probably intended to use the new profits to retool the bigger Hornet line. However, between product shortcomings and its generally weaker dealer network, it was not to be. Instead, they ended up going hat in hand to George Mason at Nash.

Among the Independents, only Nash/AMC introduced an all-new body after 1953. They were the only ones with the proven volume and profits to get whatever financing they needed.

Would Packard have been able to get financing on its own for the 1957 bodies had they not bought Studebaker? Who knows... With the decline in volumes between 1953 and 1956, even with the brief uptick in 1955, they may still have had an uphill battle finding the money.

Most likely their only hope would have been a combination with Nash and Hudson in AMC. But George Romney was quick to cut his losing lines in 1957 and ditch not only the larger Nashes and Hudsons, but their names as well. Who knows how far in advance Romney planned to exit the large car market? Maybe that exit plan was a bigger factor in him not seeking to bring in Packard -- perhaps an even bigger reason than the personality clash with Nance.

So now, back to our topic!

It seems that E. Grand Boulevard was a lot better documented than Conner Avenue, especially photographically, so I enjoy learning anything I can about that ill-fated plant. I would definitely love to see photos (if any exist) of the signage that Leedy mentioned in his last post.

Posted on: 2018/9/23 17:03
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Re: The Old Motor: Workers Dismantling Assembly Line 1954
#35
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Kevin
Leeedy, does that retrofit building still stand, or did that get the "Chrysler bulldozer modification" too?

Posted on: 2018/8/28 14:33
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Re: Your Favorite Packard
#36
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Kevin
There are a lot of exceptional Packards to choose from, but perhaps the ultimate Classic Packard for me is the 1934 Twelve Dietrich Individual Custom line. Any of the body styles are virtual perfection, but the open styles are my favorites. The convertible sedan and the convertible vistoria are total Nirvana.

My second place favorite would be a 1955-56 Caribbean convertible, followed by a 1956 Patrician sedan.

Posted on: 2018/3/26 11:33
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Re: Various CL Pickings
#37
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Kevin
I was checking out the 1956 Executive listed above (https://southjersey.craigslist.org/cto ... 6-packard/6475171512.html). Does anyone recognize the color? It's not one of the elusive Flamingo paint code cars, is it?

Posted on: 2018/1/30 11:59
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Re: Various CL Pickings
#38
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Kevin
I can see both sides of the coin... on one hand, the price seems about fair based on Hagerty's latest valuation of a #4 Fair car at $43,200, and the $40,000 asking price is just a starting point anyway. But as has been pointed out, it's lacking one of the defining, critical components of the series, the dual-quad setup. But on the other hand, the single four-barrel is a lot easier to live with. If you can find a 1955 (because 1956's were different) complete-with-batwing dual-quad set up for sale, I'm guessing they would be in the $2,000 to $3,000 range?

One thing for certain with this particular car -- you'd have to love pink!

And another certainty -- it should make the next owner very happy indeed!

Posted on: 2018/1/9 14:00
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Re: Tours of Packard Plant
#39
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Kevin
See our August 13 post on our Motor City Packards Facebook page for some photos of the very first tour given by Pure Detroit and Arte Express:

https://www.facebook.com/MotorCityPack ... LhVMgX5PMhtw9oIuJnG29_zZw

Posted on: 2017/8/28 9:49
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Re: Kanter's 1952 Packard Limo Restoration
#40
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Kevin
Any news on this project? This has been a favorite of mine to follow!

Posted on: 2017/8/4 9:15
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