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Board index » All Posts (DavidPackard)




Re: The hood locks 1948 22nd Series
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DavidPackard
Thanks Howard;
I was thinking of placing the 'J' hooks into the holes in the hood where the 'pins' go, and then figure-out the CG problem with an adjustable lifting point concept. I will be lifting the hood straight up & down. You could also do that with your cherry picker process . . . just as long as the car has wheels installed. I'll add a set of anti-rotation cords so the radio antenna doesn't get clipped when the hood is free of the car. I know a lot of 'baby bird' owners used lifting slings to remove the roof of their T-Bird.
dp

Posted on: 2015/10/6 11:22
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Re: Rear Pinion Crush Spacer
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DavidPackard
Concerning the pinion seal replacement procedure; I know the standard procedure is to pre-mark the clocking position of every component that is going to be removed, and upon seal renewal, reassemble with the goal of restoring the clocking positions, especially the nut to pinion shaft relationship. Apparently I have a long lost brother in Australia that has just introduced the idea of monitoring the axial play of the pinion and become fully awake when that axial play approaches zero. As with the standard procedure, Peter suggests a check of the torque required to rotate the pinion as a segregate for pinion bearing pre-load.
Now for the assumptions that I have made about automotive differential design. I see the crush collar as a rather unique spring that is intended to be plastically deformed during assembly, but that collar should have some amount of 'spring-back' when the load is removed. If the axial motion of the pinion is monitored during disassembly there should be some initial nut removal rotation that has no effect on the axial play of the pinion. After the collar spring-back has concluded a relationship between the nut rotation and axial play should be quite predicable by the pitch of the thread.
My '48 has a leaking pinion seal that may need replacement, however the leak is far less with the car being used regularly so I may not need to rush on that task. After reading this posting, my plan is now to use the standard procedure of marking the clocking position of everything in sight, measure the pinion torque prior to disassembly, and then try my hand at monitoring the spring back of the collar. Upon reassembly I suspect all of the stars should realign. I'll post my results if I have any new information to add to the collective experience.

Posted on: 2015/10/6 11:06
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Re: The hood locks 1948 22nd Series
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DavidPackard
On many occasions a 'helping hand' is not available to help me remove the hood. Has anyone out there built a sling and block & tackle set-up to make the hood removal a 'one old man' job? I've got a lot of winches and 'come-alongs, and a bunch of hooks in the garage ceiling that can handle several hundred pounds. I'm thinking of a process 1.) drive the car into the garage, 2.) remove the hood, 3.) back the car out, 4.) deal with storing the hood out of harm's way, 5.) pull the car back into the garage for a serious wrench spinning session. I'm thinking a couple of spreader bars and some nylon straps with 'J' hooks. Has anyone else solved the one man Packard hood removal problem?

Posted on: 2015/10/6 10:01
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Re: The hood locks 1948 22nd Series
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DavidPackard
Sheepishly I'll admit that I have driven my '48 many miles with one side of the hood not latched, but rest assured in every case it was unintentional. In the case of an alligator style hood I would think the risks are very high, but with our style of hood opening I don't see the presents of a lot of aero-force developed in the direction needed to pivot the hood. Plus, to me, without counter balance springs the required opening force seems rather high. I've driven at a speed as high as 50 mph with one side unlatch . . . curiously it seems it's always the left side (:>). Just keep the speed at a reasonable level and the hood should be just fine.
dp

Posted on: 2015/10/6 9:35
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Re: One Wire 6 volt positive ground alternator
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DavidPackard
Hello again;
As a parting shot I've included a photo of the PowerGen 'old school generator' alternator installed in my '48.
I completely agree with BigKev on the superior attributes of a three wire installation, versus the quick and dirty one wire installation of a Delco 10SI type alternator. You can dramatically change the 'cut-in' speed of a Delco 10SI by trickling an excitation current to terminal 1. I would recommend something near 1 ampere of current. That would be 6 ohms of circuit resistance if your car is 6 volt, or 12 ohms for a 12 volt system. I have many years of experience with an alternator with one ampere of excitation. That amount of current lowered the cut-in from 1100 rpm to 400 rpm on my '30 Model A ( converted to 12 volt negative ground ). When that car was 6 volt positive ground with an alternator I did not perceive a late cut-in. By the way I have a few pages from a Toronado shop manual, and that shows a 10 ohm resistor in parallel with the 'idiot' light, with both connected to terminal 1 of the alternator.
Terminal 2 is intended to be the battery voltage feedback to the alternator . . . very useful if the battery is electrically a long way from the alternator. Note the emphasis on 'electrically a long way' that could be a short distance with undersized conductors (wires), or a large physical distance, as in the battery mounted in the trunk. I think that feature was built into alternators to help reduce the amount of copper GM was putting in cars. My shop manuals show this terminal connected to a battery junction block. The Saturday night show crowd run a short jumper wire from the alternator output back to terminal 2. The irony is that many 'one wire' internal regulators have this feature built-in.
I have a pretty comprehensive Delco alternator parts book. I have not found rotors or stators specifically for 6 volt applications. I do find a distinction between 12 volt versus 24 volt components. I've assumed 6 volt alternators are assembled using 12 volt components. There are 6 volt specific voltage regulators ( no surprise there ), and positive or negative ground specific rectifiers ( again no surprises ). Some of the regulators are clearly described as 'one-wire', and some regulators have webbed terminals ( terminals 1 and 2 connected together). I'm not sure what that's all about yet.
You can go too far wrong installing a 'one wire' alternator with only one wire connected . . . that is the intent of that product. My motivation with the Model A was to configure the wiring to accept a standard replacement alternator available as a 'rebuilt' from any parts house just in case of a break-down a long way from home. The GM standard was a three-wire configuration, so that's how I wired my Model A. Along the way to that goal I got a cut-in speed more suited to the Model A's idle speed. If the PowerGen on the '48 lets me down on the road, then a considerable more creativity will need to be exercised.
dp

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Posted on: 2015/8/26 22:23
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Re: One Wire 6 volt positive ground alternator
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2015/8/25 15:21
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Re: '48 Head Light Switch & Circuit Breaker
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DavidPackard
The '48 circuit breaker is replaceable without removing the switch. Modern breakers appear to have the same geometry as the historic examples, so availability is not an issue. The breaker does not have a built-in mounting bracket so you might have to shop around. I use DelCity.Com for my automotive electrical materials (switches, wire, shrink tubing, connectors). I did remove the front seat cushion to make it a bit easier to get comfortable on what I was expecting to be a long job . . . it wasn't . . . long that is, but I could never find a good place for the 'string light'.

The modern unit operates at least 30 degrees cooler than the original item (135 F v 165 F), and the modern unit data was recorded at a higher outside air temperature than the original which matters with circuit breakers. Only the wire connections with 'bullet connectors' need to be removed so remember with color wire goes where.

So far so good. I'll re-post if the diagnosis was wrong, or the modern unit isn't up to the job. I measured about 16-20 amps passing thru the breaker (2 headlights, 2 tail lights, 1 license plate bulb) and installed a 30 A modern unit. If the Packard original unit was marked that ink left the station long ago. I've also read that circuit breakers have a finite life if they are asked to open and close. One source indicated about 50 cycles before the arcing at the contacts renders the breaker useless.

dp

Posted on: 2014/6/19 19:07
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Re: Cavalier Electrical Accessory
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DavidPackard
I'm familiar with those units. The folks that build them suggest not to use them on devices with high initial current flow such as incandescent lighting. They do have an excellent track record powering the type of devices you mentioned.

The circuit I'm working on would be on the point side of the tachometer where the switching frequency is in the order of 100 Hz. In either the tach application or with steady state signals like the stop, turn, or tail lights the load on the 6 volt side will be something like 0.02 A, which should not jeopardize the wire harnesses or switches of the car.

The load on the 12 volt side will be totally dependent on the equipment installed, however I can limit the current through my circuit to approximately 0.3 A by driving a relay and allow that set of points carry the full 12 volt load. I've got 6 volt relays up to and including an 80 A rating. The voltage rating of the relay in this case refers to the voltage required to activate the switching feature of the relay. The main set of contacts have sufficient dielectric characteristics to withstand many times the anticipated 12 volts.

dp

Posted on: 2014/3/31 15:10
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Re: Cavalier Electrical Accessory
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DavidPackard
No current plans to go crazy with the audio capability.
I do reserve the right to re-charge a phone or tablet and operate a GPS if need be.

I'm also working on an integrated circuit that will allow a car buff to install a modern tachometer, which would normally constructed to function with 12V negative ground power and ignition signal, into one of our 6 volt positive ground cars. There are some low RPM, 270 degree sweep units that would be quite beneficial in either the car or shop.

The same circuit design should work on installation of additional LED stop, turn, and tail lights, if that be needed. I have some experience driving cars that are significantly sub-sonic with respect to the rest of the traffic. The additional rear illumination appears to awake the over-taking driver at a respectable distance. I have one installation equipped with 4 way flashing capability which I believe is capable of bring the approaching driver out of a cell-phone induced coma even during the day-light hours.

Unless your willing to purchase all of the LEDs individually and spec-out the correct resistor for each, most of the pre-packaged assemblies are for 12 volt. I have had success with the Radio Shack individual 12 volt LEDs (available in red, amber, & green). They light-up just fine on 6 volts, I guess that would be 6.5 - 7.5 volts. I've got one hooked-up to the over drive circuit on the '54 Cavalier, much like the feature on the '48 Deluxe Eight.

dp

Posted on: 2014/3/31 12:09
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Cavalier Electrical Accessory
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DavidPackard

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Posted on: 2014/3/30 23:24
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