Merry Christmas and welcome to Packard Motor Car Information! If you're new here, please register for a free account.  
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Who is Online
54 user(s) are online (42 user(s) are browsing Forums)

Members: 0
Guests: 54

more...
Helping out...
PackardInfo is a free resource for Packard Owners that is completely supported by user donations. If you can help out, that would be great!

Donate via PayPal
Video Content
Visit PackardInfo.com YouTube Playlist

Donate via PayPal

Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (DavidM)




Re: Wade's Workshop
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Mal,
I am not sure what interest a 1912 2 cylinder Maxwell has to the Packard owning forum readers however there is a tenuous connection in that the flywheel found its way to "Wades shed" and you started it so I guess that allows for a response. Your description of the hinged con. rod is perfect and I would like to post a picture to show this primitive design but VB has gone to the UK for 3 weeks and taken the camera with her. I bought this car from US "fully restored" and have just completed a total rebuild on the "fully restored" engine (sounds familiar I am sure). The cylinders were so corroded they had to be sleeved and the new babbit metalled con rods had only about 50% contact, the rest was undersize. As for hot rodding (or is it rat rodding, whatever that means?) I had to buy new pistons and aluminum is the only way to go, there are no balance weights on the crank shaft so the lighter the better and incidentally after trying in vain to get a price from Egge, friends in US suggested I try Arias who responded immediately with a price that proved to be cheaper than Egge when they eventually responded, they are beautifully made and I highly recommend them. During discussion on a Maxwell chat line it was suggested that the antiquated conrods be replaced with ones from an A model Ford which are dimensionally identical. The result is that the old (4 1/2" dia) pistons and conrods weigh 3.7 kgs each (that's about 8 lbs for our US friends who are still to get their act together), the news ones weigh almost exactly half that. As for the compression ratio I just re-checked the figures and the information I gave you was incorrect, the original CR is 3.1 : 1 and with the new domed pistons this increases to 4.0 : 1 which might reduce the time for 0 to 30 mph from 10 minutes to maybe 8 minutes. Seriously it is all in the interest of smoother running and reduced engine load.
I do have Packards (1920's)and unlike other more sensible owners who have advanced to the later, easier to drive models, I like the older ones and as I couldn't afford an early Packard model 48 or twin six I opted for the brass era 2 cyl. Maxwell.
That,I am sure the readers will agree, is more than enough on Maxwells so back to things Packard.

Posted on: 2009/10/2 5:23
 Top 


Re: Wade's Workshop
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Mal, Rust on new chrome is bad , looks like they skipped the copper coat. If you are looking for an electroplater, I have had very good results from Astor Plating at Villawood, for many years. (hope they didn't do yours!)
David

Posted on: 2009/7/9 5:22
 Top 


Re: Vapor lock
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
My experience with vapor lock is confined to the Packards of the 1920's where it is a serious problem here in Australia in hot weather and long climbs. I have been told by a fuel company engineer that the problem in our old cars will be much worse today than many years ago. The reason is that modern fuels have a lower boiling point to suit the modern high pressure fuel injection systems. The high pressure raises the boiling point well above the engine bay operating temperatures so that it should not be a problem in fuel injected cars.
I live with this problem by adding up to 10% kerosene to the fuel in summer, as recommended by the fuel company, I have tried diesel but it was not very effective. An electric fuel pump bypassing the vacuum tank (pre-fuel pump) would be a better solution.
My 1922 Packard has the original "Packard Fuelizer" carburetor which incorporates a small combustion chamber to heat the fuel, presumably to aid vaporization in cold weather. A small amount of fuel is bled into the combustion chamber on the carburetor where it is ignited by a glow plug operating from a separate coil. The mixture is adjustable and the hand book describes the procedure and correct flame temperature. Obviously this is not used today.

Posted on: 2009/7/2 7:50
 Top 


Re: 1925 Packard information
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
G/Day Vic,
Congratulations on obtaining the Packard 326 which should be higher geared than the Buick so it should run a little easier on tour.
I am not sure that I can live up to Mal's beat up, I have a 1922/ 126 that I have had for about 35 years and 2 1929/ 633's.
I use 7/8" to 14mm spark plug adapters in all of my cars so that I can buy the plugs at any local parts supplier. I know these are still available but will need to do some research to find the source. I am currently using 14mm "Champion N12YC" plugs in all of my cars and they work well.

I use Penrite oils in my cars, Penrite "Shelsey Medium" is the recommendation for the 633 which would be closest to your 326 however I suggest you contact them, they are in Melbourne or check their web site. I would think that the viscosity of SAE 50 SAE would be too high. Also I agree with Owen-Dyneto, I would drop the sump (speaking OZ) and do a thorough clean.

Many years ago I obtained information from Bijur when they could still supply parts for our Packards and they advised that we should use SAE 40-50 non-detergent oil in the chassis lubricator. For very cold climates they recommended SAE 30.

If you let have an e-mail address I will send you a membership form for the Packard Club of Australia. (membership is compulsory for all OZ Packard owners, especially if they have Packards of the 20's!!!)

Look forward to meeting you at Kangaroo Island in 2010, in your "Al Capone" gear.

David - Sydney

Posted on: 2009/5/10 19:57
 Top 


Re: How old are you?
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
66, Car nut as long as I can remember. Got my first Packard in 1976 a 1922 model which I still have plus a 1929 633 Roadster and 1929 633 Sedan. Hoping to kick the habit but the prospects are not good. Perhaps us Aussies could take the lead and start an "Oldcaraholics Anonymous", think of the money we would save.

David

Posted on: 2009/4/16 1:56
 Top 


Re: Modern DuPont formulas for Packard colors
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Mike,
Have you looked at the Auto Color web site, they claim to have color chips for most cars from about the late 1920's including Packard, they can also supply the paint .
http://www.tcpglobal.com/autocolorlibrary/acl_files/packard.html
I bought a colour chip for my 1929 Packard from them.
David -Australia

Posted on: 2009/2/2 6:28
 Top 


Re: Mal's '41 120 Coupe
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Bad luck Mal not getting the '41 registered today, should be straight forward tomorrow.
I am sure Wade will have a supplier for the new oil filter however just in case he needs it there is a company in Blacktown that sells nothing but filters for cars and trucks. They let me go out the back to search their shelves for an oil filter that I could adapt to my 1929 633. Very helpful. I think they are "Western Filters", if Wade needs it I will look up the contact details.
Good luck tomorrow. David

Posted on: 2009/1/13 5:19
 Top 


Re: Twin Lakes Classic Auto Car Club Show and Shine
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Re those mounts on the back of the 1927 Packard tourer, they support the top frame when the top is down.

David

Posted on: 2008/11/13 3:35
 Top 


Re: Mal's '41 120 Coupe
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Trunnion Block,
I should have checked before stating that the trunnion blocks were on the LHS on my 1929's. I just checked , both cars have the trunnion blocks on the RHS same side as the steering box. These Packards were fully manufactured in US as RH drive cars before export to Australia.
Sorry about the misinformation.
As for the origin of the idea, I would suspect that Beverly Kimes was aware of the much earlier comments by Turnquist and her research revealed different information. Interesting.
David

Posted on: 2008/9/6 20:56
 Top 


Re: Mal's '41 120 Coupe
Home away from home
Home away from home

DavidM
Trunnion Block.
Referring to Tom's comment that the trunnion block was introduced on the 1930 7th Series cars. At the risk of being picky, the trunnion block was introduced on the 1929 6th Series. According to the Turnquist book it can also be found on some late 443 Series (1928). Turnquist also says that it was invented by a Frenchman and the right to its exclusive use was purchased by Packard.
The trunnion block is on the LHS of both of my 6th Series cars, they are both RHD.
David

Posted on: 2008/9/5 20:47
 Top 



TopTop
« 1 ... 41 42 43 (44)



Search
Recent Photos
Photo of the Day
1936 PACKARD 120 EIGHT 5-PASS TOURING SEDAN
Recent Registry
Website Comments or Questions?? Click Here Copyright 2006-2021, PackardInfo.com All Rights Reserved