Hello and welcome to Packard Motor Car Information! If you're new here, please register for a free account.  
Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Recent Comments
Who is Online
68 user(s) are online (49 user(s) are browsing Forums)

Members: 0
Guests: 68

more...
Helping out...
PackardInfo is a free resource for Packard Owners that is completely supported by user donations. If you can help out, that would be great!

Donate via PayPal

Forum Index


Board index » All Posts (BigKev)




Re: Car Titles, engine numbers and vin #'s
#1
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
Wherever possible, I'd have the car re-titled using the Vehicle Number. It's the number that gives us the most information that is similar to a modern VIN.

It identifies the exact body model, year, and sequential production number.

None of the other numbers give you anything close, and any records that would have correlated are kaput.

Engine number gives you a year and engine type/CID but could be applicable to several models, and as we know can get swapped if an engine is not economically rebuildable vs a swap.

The Theft proof number can give us a rough year or range but are they are no a fast and quick reference that can be a guaranteed answer.

So with all that in mind, the VN is the only one that can give you info about the car, with just that number, and is decypherable.

Posted on: 6/2 7:57
 Top 


Re: Clipper tire size
#2
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
These are the tires I used on my '54 Clipper, they are radials that are made to look exactly like a ply-bias tire. Skinny tread, pie crust edge. The height ratio is perfect and skinny tread really helps with the low speed turning with no power steering.

Attach file:



jpg  Tires.jpg (627.96 KB)
1_60b66305e0958.jpg 1280X960 px

Posted on: 6/1 10:40
 Top 


Re: Copper Nickel Brake Line
#3
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
It's nearly impossible to replace the entire brake line in one piece with the body on the frame. These were installed by the factory before the body was mated.

Buy a flaring tool and bending tool, both of which are pretty cheap, and some extra fittings. My line runs as two pieces with a connection at the midpoint on the frame rail.

I used the lines from NAPA for both brake and fuel without issue. See my project blog for more info and pics.

Posted on: 6/1 10:20
 Top 


Re: 1954 Pacific figuring out the VIN
#4
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
Here is an example of a 54 VN Door Jam Plate. There were no provisions for the trim code on it, it was on a sticker on the passenger side of the glovebox.

The 1955 plate had the trim codes.

Attach file:



png  54VNPlate.png (25.45 KB)
1_60b65d0020cc9.png 332X88 px

Posted on: 6/1 10:14
 Top 


Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#5
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
Glad it was something simple and no extra parts required!

Posted on: 5/30 7:02
 Top 


Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#6
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
I would at least pull that side apart and check the axle and bearing. Check for any fresh witness marks where something could be rubbing/contacting.

Make sure the edge of the brake shoe metal isn't contacting the drum on the side. Also, make sure the drum isn't contacting any of the hardware or backing plate in any way.

Did you inspect the rear bearing before repacking it? Worn or stuck roller(s)? Scored race? Abnormally loose rollers, or ones with side to side play?

Last thing I could think of is incorrect axle play. Shim stack incorrect.

I'd pull it apart and at least inspect everything before ordering parts. It could be something that just needs adjustment.

Posted on: 5/28 9:35
 Top 


Re: Spam
#7
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
It's been removed. Sorry I was sick for a few days.

Posted on: 5/10 19:28
 Top 


Re: BigKev
#8
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
Yes, everything is on locking/swivel casters.

So I can roll that entire workshop out or move it around. I often roll that larger table/bench (6' x 3) over to where the daily drivers normally sit when working on larger projects. It's a great assemble table. Also, I can slide the blast cabinet to the right if I need to use it quickly.

The smaller table/benches are 2' x 4'. So I can put them together to create a 4' x 4' etc. Under the larger table is a rolling tool cart when I often roll out and use as an outfeed table for my table saw. My miter saw is on a HF tool cart with the top installed upside down to give me a flat surface. I can roll that into the middle of the space when cutting longer boards.

If I am using the table saw or miter, I usually roll them to the edge of the large garage door to help keep the dust down. Even with the shop vac and separator hooked up to the tool, they still spew dust.

This all goes back to having a flexible space that can change over time without having to rebuild everything.

Posted on: 4/26 8:10
 Top 


Re: Cortes121
#9
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
New tanks are coated or have a terne (sp?) coating that protects them. Having rust above the fuel level is a nightmare, especially on the underside of the top of the tank. As that area is very hard to clean. I went around and around with rust cloging fuel filters.

I could run the car for hours in the garage with no issue. But drive it a few blocks with the fuel sloshing around and in breaks that rust scale loose and then that gets sucked up and next thing you know your walking home to get tools to clean out the filter.

I took my tank and had it Renu'd. The drill holes in the tank it various spots to be able to media blast it to bare metal. The holes are then plugged and then it's coated inside and out with an epoxy sealer that is then baked on. Far more durable than "pour-in" style sealers and guaranteed for life.

When I did mine, repo's from Kanter were not available yet. But the cost was relatively the same. I still have a mondo-sized aviation fuel filter back by the tank as getting stranded by a fuel clogged has left me traumatized.

All this is covered in my project blog.

Posted on: 4/26 8:00
 Top 


Re: BigKev
#10
Webmaster
Webmaster

BigKev
A weekend project. My workshop space is ever evolving with interests. So I want a wall system that was a bit more felxible for the future. I've used GearTrack over the years, and its great in general. But expensive and every "hook" or attachments costs money and there are only so many options. So I decided to strip all that way back to the bare walls and install French Cleats. Basically, I paint a 4 foot tall black stripe on the wall to give some contrast, and then the 1x4's were cut with 45 degree bevel and double screwed into each stud. Each cleat is about 3 1/4 tall, with 3 1/2 spacing between each cleat. Now I can make any fixture I want to hang anywhere I want on the wall and it attached and moves whenever I want to rearrange. I can ever grab something off the wall like drill bits and move them over to an area I am working and then hang them over there. Each fixture has the reverse cleat so gravity holds everything in place. They are strong. I can grab one of the wall cleats by fingertips and pull myself up off the floor. I've pretty much built each fixture out of various pieces of scrap wood I've had.

Attach file:



jpg  FC1.jpg (3,827.77 KB)
1_6086c12c94936.jpg 4032X3024 px

jpg  FC2.jpg (5,163.13 KB)
1_6086c16f1aadf.jpg 4032X3024 px

jpg  FC3.jpg (4,825.46 KB)
1_6086c178a4db6.jpg 4032X3024 px

jpg  FC4.jpg (8,890.98 KB)
1_6086c1846253a.jpg 4032X3024 px

Posted on: 4/26 7:35
 Top 



TopTop
(1) 2 3 4 ... 866 »



Search
Recent Photos
Photo of the Day
1941 Convertible Sedan
Recent Registry
Website Comments or Questions?? Click Here Copyright 2006-2021, PackardInfo.com All Rights Reserved