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Board index » All Posts (scott12180)




Re: Overdrive on 1925 Packard
#1
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
Yes, Thank you.

I've had Mitchells on two Packards over the years. They are an option but very noisy. Perhaps on an open car with the top down they are OK, but not in a closed car.

My concern is the space available with the torque arm a few inches from the drive shaft. Perhaps the torque arm makes a convenient place to mount an overdrive. . . I don't know.

There is an early Packard available that I'm interested in, but with its stump-puller gearing and not knowing if an overdrive is possible, it gives me pause.

So just wondering if anyone out there has done it.

-- Luke

Posted on: 2019/5/29 7:59
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Overdrive on 1925 Packard
#2
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
Curiosity question ---
Has anyone put an overdrive onto a first or second series Packard Eight --- 1924, 25 or 26 --- which has the torque arm?

Long time ago I owned a '26 236 Phaeton and added a Mitchell overdrive. But that car did not have the torque arm. By midway into the second series they had switched to just Hotchkiss drive, which is drive through the springs.

I've wondered if there is room enough to add an overdrive, either Mitchell or something else, on one of these earlier cars. From the factory, they are all geared very slow, like 4.69. (Except the Sport, of course).

Thanks -- Luke

Posted on: 2019/5/25 9:05
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Re: 1938 Super Eight for sale
#3
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
You also need to wonder why the car has been for sale for so very long. Yes, the price isn't attractive but if it were a good car you would think someone would step up.

Once upon a time I went to look at a 1934 in Savannah Georgia. Looked great in the photos but when I got to see and drive the car, it felt all worn out. The odometer really must have rolled, and the owner who was rather proud of the car (or trying to pretend to be) showed me a very thick notebook of everything done to it. Well. . . . if it really was a good car, why did it need so very much work? Why did literally every part of the car need attention at some point.

Caveat Emptor !

Posted on: 2019/3/6 9:41
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Re: Engine Serial number on 1924 Eight
#4
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
There's nothing on this website which appears to cover Packards from the 1920's and earlier.
So yes, I would appreciate if you could dig that information out.

I'm not in a terrible hurry but am going to look at the car this weekend, and so it would be helpful if that FA suffix code meant anything I should know about !

Thanks -- Luke

Posted on: 2019/3/4 20:25
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Re: 1938 Super Eight for sale
#5
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
I share your love for the '38 Super 8 and Twelve styling. Just works for me.

I owned a '38 Super Eight for a few years and can attest, as can others, that the engine blocks are indeed prone to cracking. Especially now that they are 80 years old, if a block is not cracked yet, there's a good chance that when you start driving it, it will crack. And repairs seem to be next to impossible. (Of course anything is possible with a bottomless checkbook. You could cast new blocks !)

Two suggestions:
If you find a nice Super 8, you should immediately start looking for a '37 or '39 cylinder block because you will need it someday. And if you rebuild the engine, it will do no good to rebuild the '38 cylinder block because all the money you spend would be thrown away when it cracks later on. Rebuild a '37 or '39. Both blocks may just bolt on to the existing crankcase with minor alterations. Perhaps others can speak more authoritatively.

The other suggestion is to find a Twelve. They also have their share of problems namely that the cylinder heads being of aluminum are prone to corrosion failure. But there are new heads available. You should buy two heads ($5000+) if they are available because, again, you will need them someday.

Best of luck finding a car. There are a few on the market, both Eights and Twelves.

And yes, gearing is slow. High speed gears were available, but I don't know if anyone is making them anymore. I've no idea if an overdrive would fit but that would be your best option with an Eight as these are heavy cars. Unless you live in Nebraska where the terrain is flat as a floor.

-- Luke

Posted on: 2019/3/4 8:43
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Engine Serial number on 1924 Eight
#6
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
In the attached photo from a 1924 1-36 Eight, there are two letters after the six-digit engine serial number. What looks like an F and an A.

Anyone know what they mean?

Thanks --- Scott

Attach file:



jpg  (106.79 KB)
101212_5c7b3474798ef.jpg 1152X871 px

Posted on: 2019/3/2 20:59
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Aluminum cylinder heads on the Twelve
#7
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
Hi All ---
Apologies if this has been discussed before. . . .

On the Twelve engine of the mid-to-late 1930's, the cylinder heads were aluminum, so I understand. At least the car I am interested in has aluminum heads.

My question is, are all these aluminum heads just a time bomb waiting to go off? Will a blown head gasket be inevitable? Will replacement heads be a necessity in time?

Or is it possible that they could likely be just fine?

This question is partly motivated by my experience with the 1938 Super Eight engine. In that case, it's a good bet that if the block is good today, it will be bad tomorrow.

Thanks, guys
--- Luke

Posted on: 2019/2/14 13:48
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Ignition Coil for 1932 Std Eight
#8
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
I suspect I may have ignition coil problems on my 1932 Standard Eight.

Does anyone have a suggestion for an appropriate coil?
Source/Vendor as well as part number or something I can zero in on?

Thanks --
-- Luke

Posted on: 2018/11/30 18:18
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Twelve cylinder heads
#9
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
Just curious. . ..
I understand that many Twelve engines used aluminum cylinder heads which by now are or could be compromised due to electrolytic interaction.

Are new cast iron (or aluminum) heads available? Has someone made them, or if you have such a car do you just need to search for original cast iron heads?

--Scott

Posted on: 2018/10/3 21:08
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1940 Super 8
#10
Quite a regular
Quite a regular

scott12180
A while ago I bought a 1938 Super 8 1603. Nice original car but I soon learned that the engine blocks in the 38 Super 8's are prone to cracking. And, from others experience, if they weren't cracked now they probably will if you intend to drive the car. Anyway. . . .

A 1940 180 has come up which I'm interested in.

Are there any concerns to be aware of in this model and vintage? I'd like to know what I'd be getting into before I have that sinking feeling once the car is in my garage.

--Scott
Troy, NY

Posted on: 2018/7/19 7:07
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