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Board index » All Posts (ironhead.chris)




Re: 51-54 (55-56?) Hood Hinge Spring
#1
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Chris R
I'm glad I was able to help!

Posted on: 7/7 13:12
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Re: 51-54 (55-56?) Hood Hinge Spring
#2
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Chris R
Hey Kev,

I have a set for ya. PM me your address and I'll send 'em out.

-Chris

Posted on: 7/6 15:25
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Re: Wheel prep for tubeless tires?
#3
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Chris R
Quote:

BigKev wrote:
Late on this, but my 54 wheels were so crusty they wouldn't seal and leaked air. I had them media blasted clean to remove any trace of rust, then primed with epoxy and painted inside and out.

The '54 rims are different as they were made for tubeless tires.


Did they leak where the tire mated to the rim or between the two halves?

Thanks Kev!

-Chris


Quote:

Marty or Marston wrote:
My preference for sealing two metals where you want a great seal with some flexibility is to use a polyurethane caulking compound (Home Depot). Of course, the key to success with any of the products mentioned above is a good, clean surface. There is also automotive seam sealer found in paint stores that specialize in auto paints. It has great adhesion propertied with some flexibility.


I had thought about automotive seem sealer but I've heard it can be expensive and I imagine I wouldn't need a lot.

The caulk sounds like a plan too, but I'm not sure if it's needed. I'm sure once the tires are off, I'll have a better idea of how to tackle this.

Thank you!

-Chris

Posted on: 7/6 14:44
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Re: Wheel prep for tubeless tires?
#4
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Chris R
Quote:

kevinpackard wrote:
I ended up wire wheeling my rims, then cleaned and primed with epoxy. I sprayed the inside face and areas the tires sit with black epoxy spray paint. Haven't had any leaks so far with my new Diamondbacks, so I'm assuming the epoxy primer did the trick.

-Kevin


Thanks Kevin, I think this is the route I'm going to go.

-Chris


Quote:

Fish'n Jim wrote:
I think '53 is far enough along to be totally welded. This was mostly a case of riveted wheels, which would've been the case in '48.
Doesn't hurt to protect steel from corrosion in any case.
All else fails put a tube in.


That's interesting. I didn't even know they used to rivet wheels. Yeah, I may paint the inside just for good measure.

Thank you,

-Chris


Quote:

Wat_Tyler wrote:
My inclination would be: silicone caulk. I've used and misused it to seal all manner of leaky bits off and on for the last 40 years. Contrary to rumor, it doesn't bond the parts, but it will make them a bit more difficult to take apart should that become necessary, like on those threads that just won't seal.

If it's water-tight, it's air-tight, too.


I thought about that but I didn't know if it would be too heavy or not.

-Chris


Quote:

Phil Randolph wrote:
" Phil Swift here" Spray on Flex Seal


Haha! Funny enough, I actually have two small cans of this stuff that I received at an aviation event. I still haven't used 'em on anything. I suppose it would work well for this.

-Chris

Posted on: 6/23 11:45
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Re: Wheel prep for tubeless tires?
#5
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Chris R
Awesome! Thank you guys so much!

-Chris

Posted on: 6/22 10:16
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Re: Wheel prep for tubeless tires?
#6
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Chris R
Quote:

Mechagon wrote:
Yes, if they leak you will need a sealant of some kind. But most of the time it's not an issue. Some people like to go over any rivet holes or seams before mounting the new tires. If you have the tires dismounted it would be a good preventive measure.


Thanks Mechagon. Is the tire place likely to have the proper sealant for situations like this? Or should I try to find something ahead of time?

Thank you,

-Chris

Posted on: 6/21 14:31
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Wheel prep for tubeless tires?
#7
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Chris R
Hello all!

I've got some Diamond Back tires comin' for the 53 Convertible. I talked to a gentleman at a car show recently who owns a 48 Chrysler. He installed some tubeless tires not too long ago and had some advice for me.

He said he has a super slow leak between the two wheel halves where they're welded together on one of his wheels. He stated that many manufactures back then didn't care about making the rims air tight because they all had tubes in 'em.

He suggested I have the welded wheel seems covered in a sealant of some sort, prior to mounting the new tires, just in case.

What do you guys think? Is this necessary?

-Chris

Posted on: 6/21 12:29
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Re: Parts Book Questions: Mayfair 300 and Henney
#8
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Chris R
Quote:

HH56 wrote:
I have not read the book so not saying it is wrong but saying it is more a matter of opinion. I don't think there is any question Nance tried to upgrade Packard when he came on board but while there may have been some serious attempts to upgrade the 53 convertible and hardtop interior and upholstery to senior status, the exterior and mechanical is still almost identical to the earlier models so in that respect I think it barely moved the needle.

The 51 upgrade to 250 status primarily depended on adding teeth in the grill, a few options becoming standard, and a bit more interior chrome over their more junior siblings and that carried over mostly unchanged for 53. I believe the 53 convertible and HT models got the extra bar on the bumper to make it appear more massive like the bumper in the Patrician and 300 but that is a relatively minor senior change.

IMO, the initial look is still what most people would go by -- or at least I do -- so to me the 53 is still more junior looking compared to the significant changes in the 54s. Add in the top of the line engine for 54 and you have a real senior.


With respect, our opinions do not dictate what a car is or isn't. You can choose not to look at these cars as 300 Senior cars if you'd like, but that doesn't mean that they aren't.

With that being said, I do very much agree with you they they are much more similar to the Junior cars than the Seniors, but again, our opinions do not change the fact that Nance changed their designations for 1953.

-Chris

Posted on: 6/16 14:58
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Re: 53 Clipper manual brake master cylinder upgrade
#9
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Chris R
Is it a manual or Ultramatic?

-Chris

Posted on: 6/16 12:50
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Re: Packard Engine to GM Auto Transmission Adapters
#10
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Chris R
I met a gentleman recently that installed a 700R4 behind his 327 in a 51. He didn't recall who made the trans adaptor but he said it totally transformed the vehicle.

I'll be keeping an eye on this thread.

-Chris

Posted on: 6/16 12:48
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