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Board index » All Posts (Pack24)




Re: 1924 Sport 136
#1
Home away from home
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Karl
Hi human.. if you mean my last post #94 .... that means, that the link in my post #93 doesnt work ... so I post an other one in #94 this works for me. Hope for all other too.

Karl

Posted on: Yesterday 7:49
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#2
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Karl

Posted on: Yesterday 6:55
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#3
Home away from home
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Karl
With a lot of patience and a good friend with the right contacts, one of the last problems in the restoration of a component that was important to me was finally solved. I was looking for the original silencer. All inquiries in the last 2 years were initially unsuccessful. It also seemed unlikely to me that a silencer from 1924 could even be found. These components are the first to fall victim to rust. And it's common for owners of these 1920s models lines to opt for the replicas that fit the bill and are offered multiple times in the United States. However, it was important to me that the silencer corresponds to the original and ultimately reproduces the original sound of this model. Even though I couldn't get an original silencer anymore, I wanted a replica of the original that was at least very close in terms of construction and sound. The photos of the components from the spare parts lists show that this construction, which is delivered in individual parts, can certainly be rebuild. Also, I tried to find out the dimensions and details of this silencer. I had enlarged the photos from the spare parts list on my PC monitor so, that I could see the known diameter of the pipe... after the exhaust manifold (57mm >> 2 ¼")... could decrease at a suitable scale. Using this reference measurement I have I determined all other dimensions of the silencer based on the images that I copied from YouTube videos, showing the attachment points/brackets of the silencer to the frame and thus the length of the component. The measurement was very close to the measurement. I determined the number and arrangement of the holes in the inner pipes was very difficult because they were relatively small on the Parts List page. Since I still didn't get any feedback from the internet, I decided to build the silencer anyway based on the dimensions I found and continued to try to get the data on the important resonance pipes with the holes, the number and position of which in the silencer are crucial for the function and sound of the silencer... the very things that were essentially important to me.

Unfortunately, attempts by friends here in the forum were also unsuccessful, although there was someone who had this data but didn't give it out because he copied and sold this silencer. He believed that sharing the data could harm his company. Now, I don't know how many 1924-25 models there are whose owners still need this original exhaust, or how many of them would be able and willing to recreate this exhaust themselves. I think you could count them on one one hand for the next decades. Anyway... at a classic car meeting here in Germany I told my friend about my problems with this silencer. He owns two Packards of the 30th here in Germany and is very active in the US Packard scene on the West Coast. Prof. Wolfgang Eisert is a regular guest at the Packard International Meetings and also a judge at these on the West Coast.

https://deref-gmx.net/mail/client/EclqIBj6p-8/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.latimes.com%2Fsocal%2Fdaily-pilot%2Fnews%2Fstory%2F2024-05-06%2Fpackard-show-drives-car-enthusiasts-to-hyatt-regency-newport-beach

He used his contacts and asked someone who is also known here in this forum. He couldn't get the data for this muffler, but he knew someone who had some cars from the 1920s and who he believed still had parts for these cars. In fact, it turned out that this acquaintance actually had one of these mufflers. Thanks Haven…. complete, albeit in a pitiful condition, but therefore also perfect to save the missing data and thus enable me to create an actual “original replica”. My friend Wolfgang quickly packed the Muffler into his suitcase on his next visit to California and brought it with him to Germany. But it gets even better !!! I immediately disassembled the muffler to find out how closely it would fit with the components I had already purchased for my own replica. And it's hard to believe that the original covers on the ends of the muffler fit exactly over/into the pipes that I determined and bought myself based on the calculated dimensions. So I was very accurate to the original with my measurements. I would not have expected that. Here are the first pictures.


I will further describe the construction of the muffler here in my blog and show it in the picture. Of course, I will also make all the data for the components available here in the blog so that anyone who has the ambition can recreate the original muffler themselves. Because I believe this information should be available to all Packard Enthusiasts seeking to preserve these historically significant vehicles of this era. Everything else will come soon, when the rims are finished and the frame is back on the wheels, allowing the engine to be installed and tested.

Karl

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Posted on: Yesterday 6:52
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#4
Home away from home
Home away from home

Karl
The next step has been done and the rims are now painted with a dark gray filler. Next up is the work I hate the most during a restoration process. …. sanding by hand !!!! ….. When you look at the pictures you think the surface is smooth and ready for painting. But a foam rubber pad with 600 grit that you push over the surface with light pressure shows how "rough" this surface still is. I dry sand the surfaces that have been painted with the “Filler before Top Paint” with 800 grit. To ensure that these concave and convex shaped surfaces have an optimal result ... they can only be sanded by hand. So that this doesn't take too much time, I start with 600 grit to remove the largest unevenness. These can be clearly seen if you occasionally remove dust from the surfaces using silicone remover. The sanding should be done yourself, especially with 600 grit, using only light pressure. The relatively thinly applied filler is quickly sanded through and the 600 grit can be seen in the top coat.

Karl

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Posted on: 6/13 10:15
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#5
Home away from home
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Karl
Sorry to bore you even more with the rims, but here's how to paint the rims to get a good finish on the inside and an optimal finish on the outside. After filling the rust holes with spray filler and sanding off the rest till the steel, I applied a thinner layer of spray filler to achieve a more even surface, especially on the outside. The photo shows how many uneven areas still had to be leveled out. Due to the problem with the snap rings that have to be levered over the edge... the paint on this edge application should be kept as thin as possible. That's why I sanded off the spray filler around the edges of the rims to such an extent that the steel was just visible in the high places. These areas are then covered with a primer, which is suitable for painting directly onto steel.
Now comes the dark gray primer, as can be seen in the photos for the Fender and Body. This will be then finely sanded with 800m grid sanding pads to apply the top coat. Black satin matt on the inside and dark red like the body .. on the outside. The following steps for pin striping and final clear coat of the outside of the rims I´ll show in the following post.

Karl

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Posted on: 6/3 7:17
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#6
Home away from home
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Karl
In order to concretize my results of the synchronization measurement,...
First of all... yes, all relevant components for holding the rims on the balancing machine are perfect. The adapters I made that had to be made to mount these rims on the balancing machine have a vertical runout of 1/100 mm and a side runout of 1.2/100 mm. Also negligibly low. The adapters are manufactured in such a way that the rim is forcibly centered. The stop area of the rims, which lies against the brake drums, was metallically clean during the measurement. I measured the runout at the relevant point right next to the bead area of the rim, where the tire first rests on the rim and also at the end of the tire pad, 1 cm before the start of the snap ring connection.
I measured the side runout in the area of the tire bead, where the curve ends at the rising rim flange... also approx. 6-8 mm above the tire contact patch. Basically, it should be noted that the entire tire contact area around the rim was so irregular, even in the area of the greatest runout, that a measurement with the micrometer screw was not possible. And this despite the fact that I sanded the entire surrounding surface cleanly with the eccentric sander (180 grit) and filled the remaining shallows with spray filler and then sanded them flat again, so that only (!) the depressions and holes were filled and the rest of the metal surface closed see is. The rim was visible (..as shown in the pictures...) However, it was clearly visible that the rim ring was pulled deeper where the rivets were set. It can be seen very clearly on page 8, ... picture ... 439. For me, the external indication was that the inner diameter of the rim ring did not perfectly match the outer diameter of the inner rim disc. This was clearly visible as an undulating movement on the surface as the tire was rotated under the dipstick. The observed impact was not only visible in one location, but in various locations around the entire contact patch of the tire. The 3 mm mentioned was just the largest height difference measured. The same applies to the determined lateral runout. To me this suggested that this may have been a question of production output/capacity at the time. That's why I'd be interested to know if anyone knows that the heights and lateral runout for the same rims or rims with the same design agree with my results.
As far as side runout is concerned... I would have liked to have tried to have the rims optimized as much as possible by a specialist company. Unfortunately, the last company in my area that could repair steel disc rims closed 25 years ago. Everything only works on aluminum rims. So... if it turns out that the condition of the rims is due to production, I would forget the whole thing and drive the wheels as they are.

Karl

Posted on: 5/24 11:23
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#7
Home away from home
Home away from home

Karl
……. by the way, this is the guy who lets us live upstairs in his house for he last 13 years!
His Name is Max and he's a purebred wire-haired dachshund... but all these years he said his father was a Doberman and his mother a German Shepard and that's how he always behaved, which got him some trouble with his peers over the years.
What ever ….. it looks like, …. he likes his new Sport Phaeton.

Karl

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Posted on: 5/24 1:42
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#8
Home away from home
Home away from home

Karl
Sorry friends,
but the guy who lets us live upstairs in his house,
He bought for himself a used sports convertible. The soft top was
in a very poor Condition and so I had to built him a new Top in
the last few days.
He will use it to accompany us to the next classic car meetings.
I'll now get back to the rims.
So that I can post something here on my blog again.

Karl

Posted on: 5/23 2:35
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#9
Home away from home
Home away from home

Karl
I was initially unpleasantly surprised when I had the first rim on the balancing machine and checked the synchronism. The first rim had 4mm side runout and 3mm vertical runout. But further measurements show that all rims had exactly the same heights and sideways runs. Maybe someone here knows whether these irregularities also occurred on other rims from this production period. I suspect that this was a result of the production of the rims at this time. I had taken a closer look at the rims in their raw state and noticed that there may have been problems with the fit between the two components...outer ring and inner disk because sections of the inner ring between the rivets towards the valve tube did not lie exactly against the outer ring. I assumed that the two components of the rim were placed in an assembly structure, the inner disk was tapped into the outer ring and then the rivets were pressed in. Given the tolerances at that time, it could then happen that the inner disk was not able to fully fit against the outer ring after the rivet had been driven in, which led to deformations. (Towards the end, the parts of the inner disk did not fit smoothly against the outer ring). Given the speed that his vehicle reached, this may well have been within the accepted tolerance range. The fact that all 5 rims have pretty much exactly the same deviations from ideal concentricity cannot actually be a consequence of later damage. Does anyone know more about this??
In today's pictures you can see the inside of the rims, onto which I applied spray filler/Putty with the paint gun to fill the deep rust holes. The spray filler is a relatively harder filler after it has hardened. Good for stability…. bad for manual grinding. It takes me around 7.5 hours for 2 insides of the rims because I sand the filler down so far that only the holes remain filled. After applying marking powder, you can clearly see the deep spots of the rust holes. Whenever possible, I use my eccentric sander maschines. However, there are still enough areas that can only be sanded manually. It's especially funny between the rivets.

Karl

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Posted on: 5/17 15:58
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Re: 1924 Sport 136
#10
Home away from home
Home away from home

Karl
No, no Mal, ... it's perfectly fine to ask this question here. It's about originality and a 1924 Packard and it fits here in my blog. Without ever having seen the vehicles live, I think this question is probably not that easy to answer. When I look at the pictures of the “original” by Steve Babinsky, I see a gray (“Dustproof Gray”) that, depending on the photo and the incidence of light, shows parts of olive green and a grayish blue. I see the same color ratios on “Sam’s” car when you zoom in on the photo. The surface of this car appears to have layers that may have been the result of subsequent paint “refreshing” or a heavy patina from the application of waxes etc. over the decades. But this is all speculative. However, I would have understood something different by “Brilliant and Flashing Gray” as it is described in the prospectus. Ultimately, the whole thing could only be clarified if these two vehicles were parked next to each other.
.............................
While David was replying I wrote this comment. So just my take on Mal's question.

Karl

Posted on: 5/16 18:12
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