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Board index » All Posts (GaryBarber)




Re: Paint work
#1
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
Yes I agree if you use a certain system, then stay with that system. If I use high build then I stay with high build all the way. If you scuff through it, then you have a high spot and need to build a bit more. I only use non-sanding when doing a repair over existing paint. I just don't like mixing primer types especially on a total repaint, use one or the other. I usually block it wet with 400, wipe with preps and tack rag twice. This works for me but other guys have success with other methods I am pretty old school and cut my teeth on lacquer and Dupont 100S.

Posted on: 11/24 13:11
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Re: Paint work
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
I would not switch to non-sanding on those spots, stay with the base primer you already used, or re-spray the car with non-sanding. Mixing primers under finished paint is not a good idea, especially with the overall costs for finish paint these days.

Posted on: 11/23 9:06
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Re: OEM paint
#3
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
The secret to achieving the lacquer look with base clear is how you buff it. I recently painted my 32 901 with base clear using Metalux with Glamor clear coat. This is a mid range system. 4 coats of base, 4 coats of clear let it dry 3-4 days in prime conditions. Then cut it wet with 1500 then wet cut it again with 3000. Put your high speed buffer away and do it with a DA on medium speed. I used Mequires 105 then Mequires Correction Compound, followed by Black Hole, ( my car is dk green and black ). Then went back and did the buffing sequence again. This will bring up the shine but not as much as a high speed which will heat up the paint and produces that Pebble Beach gloss that everyone is complaining about. I used lacquer for many years and swear that this car looks like lacquer but will retain a shine that lacquer never can.

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jpg  Surfside 2021 Word (2).jpg (3,277.16 KB)
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Posted on: 11/10 11:35
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Re: Pre War Hubcaps Year-Model ID Please
#4
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Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
C= 32 for wire wheels, but the spring clips seem to be missing on most of them.

Posted on: 10/20 9:02
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Re: Got my first flat on the '29 last night - anybody got experience changing the tubes?
#5
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
There are not split rim rims on an early Packard, they are LOCK RING rims. Split rims are two piece rims, that are bolted together, and used almost exclusively on construction equipment. Also a 100 lbs per sq in. truck tire, is a different animal than a 40 lb 1930's car tire. That said there are dangers if not handled properly as outlined in earlier posts above. I would not take these to any local tire store where some 16 yr old is changing tires. Yes a truck tire facility is still the best option, however many of us have done these tire changes without incident for years. One important factor to consider is the type of tire being used here. 1930's cars require 1930's type tires made for lock ring rim installation. The tire bead is the most important aspect of this. One tire still produced is the Firestone Balloon tire, which I am told are made in the original molds from the 1930's. These tires mold around the lock ring as the tire is inflated putting pressure on the lock ring and forcing it into the ring groove. People make a big mistake installing the wrong tire and that a major mistake with these cars, no radials here. Also check to make sure the ring has not lost its set. The ring should fit the groove and snap in tight when installed, I have seen many rings that have lost their tension and should not be used.

Posted on: 10/15 9:08
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Re: 9th Series Front Shackle
#6
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
Further update on my 9th series front spring. That pin ( or metering device ) is not shown on any Packard parts book that I am aware of, it may have been a one year thing but I understand it is not present on 10th series cars, so if it was more of an experiment, then it failed and that is likely why it was no longer used. Attached photo of lower shackle bronze bushing that was worn completely through likely do to lack of lubrication from the Bijur system possibly caused by this device. I have removed the device installed new bolts and bushings (from Bruce Blevins) and re-arced spring (from Eaton) and now the car sits level again. I will investigate the passenger side for similar issues. Bruce says he has never seen that pin before either.

Attach file:



jpg  Bushing and pin 9th series.jpg (2,800.45 KB)
165673_6163119eb8a2f.jpg 4032X3024 px

Posted on: 10/10 11:15
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Re: Got my first flat on the '29 last night - anybody got experience changing the tubes?
#7
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
Very good explanation by the way, I would add that I use my feet to walk the lock ring back in place. By all means do not use a sledge hammer, if you miss, the damage to the rim is not repairable. I use a squeeze clamp to hole the ring at the split then stomp down with the heal of my tennis shoe. That way if the ring springs back you can hold it down with your other foot and work your way around the rim. I also bounce the tire on the ground a few times while rotating it, that is an old trick to get any folds out of the tube. Baby powder works with tube insert too.

Posted on: 10/7 15:56
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Re: Lubricants - 8th Series
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
I use Sta-Lube SAE 140 Gear Oil in my 9th Series, should be the same for 8th Series cars as well, available from NAPA but you may have to order it. This gear lube is good for yellow metals which are present in these cars. If you run your car in the cold weather, you may need to go to a 90 WT in the winter, but make sure it is good for yellow metals, not all brands are. I live in South Carolina so cold weather is not a factor. I do have to double clutch the gear box for the first couple miles until the oil gets a little temperature to it.

Posted on: 9/20 17:17
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9th Series Front Shackle
#9
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
Has anyone discovered a metal rod ( pin ) inside the dog bone on the oil side of the front shackle of 9th Series cars ? See photo attached. I suspect this is a metering device to slow down the oil flow from the Bijur system so some oil stays in the upper shackle bolt. The pin is cut to about 23 degrees on each end.

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jpg  Dog Bone with meter.jpg (2,982.34 KB)
165673_61488e39256f7.jpg 4032X3024 px

Posted on: 9/20 8:35
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Re: 1930-1932 Fender Lights - 'market survey'
#10
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

GaryinSC
I too agree the economic viability of reproducing parts for old cars of this vintage is a losing proposition. However I don't think anyone who has these cars is making a choice on an economic basis anyway. I was able to secure a 32 fender light on ebay and swapped enough parts from my original and the ebay one to make one good one. Even at that I have over $500 in one good light after having to plate and repair a cracked lens rim for$ 175.00. I also was able to secure a new hub cap ( last one that Hirsch had ), and needed two more so off to the plater's again total cost over $ 1,000 to buy used ones and repair two more. So, yes there are people willing to spend considerable dollars for parts when needed, but there is a limit, we just don't know what that limit is. Hirsch told me that to make another run of hub caps they needed to order 1,000 pieces to make it viable, I suspect your light would yield the same numbers, a very tall order in deed. I think that 3D printing and CNC machining is going to yield some very viable parts in low production numbers in the near future.

Posted on: 7/25 16:52
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