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Board index » All Posts (Howard)




Re: Dad
#1
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HH56
Make sure the water or pressure inlet side is to the curved tube both in test and in the car so the pressure will help keep the valve tightly closed. Pressure on the straight tube will tend to lift the valve off the seat. Packard noted this in a 1950 service article shortly after use of that style valve was adopted.

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Posted on: Today 13:28
Howard
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Re: 1955 Packard coupe
#2
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HH56
A nice looking car and not a terrible price. Even if it needs some work it is definitely too nice for the saw if that is really his intention.

Posted on: Today 9:32
Howard
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#3
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HH56
You can do a quick check of the gauge and interconnect wire by grounding the gauge wire at the sender end -- or if the tank is already in position again there should be an inline connector in the trunk between the body loom and where the wire exits the hole in the rear panel to go under to the tank. You can access all but about 3' of the wire at the connector for measurement or grounding.

Grounding the wire, gauge should immediately start going to the full end. Do not keep it grounded longer than it takes to get to full. If gauge does not move then the wire, gauge or instrument voltage regulator is likely at fault. If it does move then something is amiss with the sender.

Using an ohmmeter between the sender terminal and ground, at empty you should read approx 73 ohms and when full about 10 ohms. With 10 gallons I would guess somewhere between 25 and 35 ohms but I have never measured so that value is just a guesstimate.

Posted on: Yesterday 22:31
Howard
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Re: Cortes121
#4
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HH56
As long as the retaining ring is out there should only be a steel washer, fiber washer, the seal and the funny shaped piston cup retainer at the end that is sort of a guide for the rod and seat for the seal. If water got into the unit possibly some corrosion has set in and the other parts are in effect glued to the bore.

I cannot remember if the seal retainer piece is steel or aluminum but if aluminum, corrosion could have swelled both items until they are firmly attached together. If the retainer ring is out and still no cooperation after a penetrating or brake fluid soak you might protect the end of the rod and then clamp it in a vise. Pull back on the master with a few sharp tugs and see if it separates. If corrosion is the issue there is every chance the rod or the cylinder or washer will need to be replaced.

There is a thread here https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/mod ... &order=ASC&status=&mode=0 where another BTV was stubborn. Ross had some ideas and PackardDon detailed the replacement parts and where to buy the repro rod and master casting. On the repro casting, the relief port is not drilled. This was a huge discussion a few years ago when it was found one of the rebuilders was filling the port with silicone. It is felt by other rebuilders that this port is definitely needed and should be drilled before installing the repro casting.

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Posted on: 5/16 20:53
Howard
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Re: Wiring Diagram for R-6 Overdrive
#5
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HH56
Here is a bit on the reverse switch. It seems to be kind of like the reverse safety switch they added to the R9 in 47-48 to kill all OD power to ensure some problem in the OD electrical did not keep the unit engaged when reverse was selected. On the R9 that was an issue.

Since the R6 centrifugal clutch apparently engaged OD as soon as it reached 25-35 mph and did not need the solenoid, I would guess the clutch going slower than that speed knew to pull the pawl and drop out of OD. Since it was all mechanical possibly if something jammed in the centrifugal clutch the R6 had the same issue as the R9 with the overrunning clutch locking up if trying to move in reverse when OD was engaged. The added reverse switch forced the solenoid to come in and pull the pawl out so it could not be in OD.

Anyway that is one theory until something better comes along.

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Posted on: 5/15 17:41
Howard
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Re: Wiring Diagram for R-6 Overdrive
#6
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HH56
I think the readable diagram did come from Motors although the 38-39 service manual has a poor reproduction of the same drawing.

The description kind of makes sense. The ign cutout circuit with the solenoid working the way the later solenoids do is what was confusing me.

If the solenoid does pull the pawl out when energized to drop out of OD then actuating the relay via kickdown with the throttle switch or reverse lockout makes more sense. Still trying to work out the cut out circuit since the book says it lasts for about 1/40 second. Be nice to know if the kickdown switch has two contact bars or one bar shared like the later switches. If two then making the upper portion to bring in the relay before breaking the lower ignition cutoff set could work although would still need to know when the cutout contacts in the solenoid operate to be sure. Later and modern kickdown switches share the contact bridge. In that switch the lower contact set used to power the relay breaks before the upper set to complete the cutout circuit makes. Either way, somehow a set of contacts in the solenoid provide the cutout ground but the question is when -- solenoid at rest or when energized or in a brief blip during movement.

Not sure where the book got the information on OD models used but I have never read in any Packard literature of an R7 being used. In 39 it was the R6 and in 40 they went to the full electric R9 and kept that thru mid 48.

Posted on: 5/15 13:13
Howard
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Re: 1942 Trunk paint, tar or?
#7
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HH56
I believe starting with the 17th series and thru 54 all trunks came at a minimum with rayon flocking on the sides and over the wheelhousings. The colors were mostly in brown to grayish shades. https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/downloads/SC/SL-VOL12NO21.pdf

The junior models had a simple rubber mat over the center of the floor. We don't have a 42 fact book on site but the 41 book you can download from the literature section has that same treatment thru the 160. On the lower models it was described as flock but the 160 description has the flocking as a luxurious suede like material. In more expensive models a carpet type mat covered the floor and in the 180 the sides were in a "patterned insulating material". On postwar at least, carpet mats were usually very thin hogshair or the like and very rough. I suspect that may have been the 42 treatment as well. It doesn't seem like Packard spent a lot of money on the trunk finishes.

The modern flocking is a much finer fiber than the course fiber material used by Packard. A reasonable job can be done with the slightly larger nylon fiber rather than using the modern rayon but modern is a much softer look than the original.

Posted on: 5/15 10:06
Howard
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Re: Wiring Diagram for R-6 Overdrive
#8
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HH56
Here is a diagram showing the two versions of the 39 wiring. Sorry I don't have anything in color.

The first version uses what appears to be an ordinary horn relay. The later version has an extra connection on the relay for power from the ignition switch.

Not having a drawing showing the contacts inside the components I can only guess as to what is happening with the relay and switches -- or even the solenoid when it provides the ign cutout ground. There is a very limited description of the R6 OD in the 38-39 service manual but I have not studied it in detail or looked in a Motors Manual to better understand the operation of the semi electric unit as compared to the later R9 and R11 full electric units.

It is possible some easy to find modern relays and a universal kickdown switch would work but won't say that as definite until studying the operation a bit more. Of course the solenoid itself would be special to that OD and hopefully still on the unit you are installing. There does not appear to be an electrical lockout switch as was on the later units so an ordinary modern universal lockout cable assy could be used if something more period appropriate is not found.

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Posted on: 5/14 18:39
Howard
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Re: water pump
#9
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HH56
I believe you may be referring to the front motor mount as the piece in question. If it is the item indicated by the read arrow, that is the front mount support which bolts to the crossmember.

You have the 110 engine but that photo is not very clear so another photo is also posted of a 120 engine showing better detail. It has a similar if not the same mount.

The bar I think may be causing the problem is depicted by the red arrow. The actual motor mount connection to the engine block is done with rubber pads squeezed between metal plates that are bolted together at the yellow arrow. There are two pieces of rubber surrounding some protrusions in the mount halves which deteriorate and are squished down so the front of the engine sags. When this happens the mount prevents direct access to the bottom bolt on the pump. You will need to use a small jack and some wood blocking under the oil pan to take the weight of the engine off the mount and raise the front of the engine enough to get a socket on the bolt.

If the rubber has deteriorated you might want to take advantage of the downtime to replace the rubber pieces. Steel has them and probably Kanter too. https://www.steelerubber.com/motor-mount-pad-30-0238-11

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jpg  110.jpg (262.95 KB)
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jpg  120.jpg (247.24 KB)
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Posted on: 5/14 14:24
Howard
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Re: 356 cuin SWAP to 359 cuin
#10
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HH56
As far as power I don't think you will see all that much difference at the wheels but could be wrong. With the limited availability of one year only parts specific to the 359 could that be an issue down the road? Also, if you are planning on keeping the automatic I would wonder if there is enough space for it.

In case you have not already checked it out there was an article published in 1953 on replacing the 356 engine in Clipper based cars with the senior 327 engine. I expect the steps and parts needed would be the same as the 359 would require but not sure how much might be different in a conventional body car with the different frame. The article might give you some ideas of all the different parts and conversion work that could be needed. There were also a couple of later supplements to the first article. https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/downloads/SC/SC-VOL27NO7.pdf

Posted on: 5/14 11:30
Howard
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