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Board index » All Posts (Howard)




Re: KPack
#1
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HH56
Two completely separate circuits.

For the headlights, if they were working previously and nothing has broken inside the switch I would look for a pulled out wire at the headlight switch terminal or to the dimmer switch and grounds. Headlights are fed from the headlight sw terminal, goes to the dimmer switch common, and two wires out from there to the junction strip on the left fender and the left bulb. A short loom section connects the left strip to another junction strip on the right fender and to that bulb putting the filaments in parallel. Ground from the bulb sockets is brought back to the junction strip mounting screws on the inner fender. A separate wire from the high beam terminal on the dimmer switch runs back inside to the high beam indicator light. Dimmer switches have been known to stick or fail.

For the turn signals, if the fronts are the only issue look for an inline connector which I think is near the left junction strip. Individual bulb feeds from the turn signal switch come out of the round connector plug and via the loom are connected to the large filament at each front parking light bulb via a double on the left and then another single inline connector on the right. Corrosion on connectors could be an issue. Grounds to the parking light sockets are provided via a path of multiple pot metal pieces in the grill finally touching the fender sheetmetal and are always an issue with 51-4s. Since you do have the parking lights, not likely the issue this time with the signals but something to keep in mind.

Here are the terminal locations. The switch is 55-6 but aside from a different shaft the layout is the same as 51-4

Attach file:



jpg  headlight sw 51-6.jpg (69.94 KB)
209_6338aa71569e1.jpg 1163X341 px

Posted on: Yesterday 15:57
Howard
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Re: gas tank question
#2
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HH56
Bare iron based sheetmetal would be quick to rust. I don't know what they might have used in the 20s -- maybe just regular zinc galvanizing -- but I believe sometime in the early 30s they started plating the tanks with a much more corrosion resistant Terne coating.

If either coating was sandblasted I would imagine that process would at least damage and maybe destroy whatever might be remaining of the original coating.

If replating is not an option then at the least I would go back with an air drying high quality modern ethanol resistant gas tank sealant or maybe a baked on epoxy.

Posted on: Yesterday 14:54
Howard
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Re: Mirrors
#3
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HH56
Probably as close as you will find commercially available today. I know several have used mirrors made for the mid 50s Chevys and those might be the same ones. Similar in shape to Packards but can't see much detail on the mounting screws. The originals only had one small hole and mounted by using a screw thru a separate bracket positioned backwards. Those appear to be similar only the screw head is on the outside.

With NOS and I think the repros once made by the company that still does high end hood ornaments being long gone maybe the next best option. Won't say for sure but isn't the seller old.parts a multi brand or specialty parts store owned or run by one of the Kanter family?

EDIT: Here is the original install diagram which I was reminded was originally posted by O_D. Apologies for not remembering where it came from to credit him.

Attach file:



jpg  55-6 Mirror template.jpg (2,723.84 KB)
209_633464ae53342.jpg 3450X2328 px

Posted on: 9/28 10:14
Howard
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Re: 58 400 ride height update
#4
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HH56
Have you read thru Dwight's article on how the bushings, shocks and overall friction will interact and can affect the suspension and operation? If not, you can download the article from the link halfway down the TL page at his website. https://www.packardparts.org/products/ ... torsion-level-suspension/

Perhaps something is amiss in one of those areas or there is always the possibility that the 55 had the heavy duty bars released early in 56 installed. If that was the case it could be there is not enough weight to really have needed them and the car is riding high because of that. Conversely, if the 56 is lower than 10" it could be it is heavily optioned so somewhat low and would have benefited from them.

At least checking the bars would be easy to do as the bulletin mentions what and where to look to see if they are installed. https://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/downloads/STB/56T-1.pdf If it does have the heavy bars or even if not, you might be able to lower the car by installing shorter links in front.

Posted on: 9/27 16:26
Howard
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Re: Packard shopping: Reyman
#5
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HH56
Once the really bad spots are reduced to something more reasonable you might be able to refine and finish the job by making a cast of the molding shape using a low melting temp metal alloy poured at a good profile spot inside the molding.

Cerrolow or Bolton 117 is alloy of several low temp metals and available on ebay. It melts at less than 120 degrees which should not damage or distort the molding. It is a low enough temp that several things could be used as a dam without melting so you could get a solid block casting an inch or two long. A big blob of silicone sealant might work as would plaster of paris. If you don't want to work with two of the metals other alloys without them are available but melt at higher temps.

Once the metal hardened remove the dams and slide or tap the casting down the molding to the damaged area. Let it assist as a dolly in recreating the correct profile. It would take some careful work with a hammer and file to get the profile back but probably doable. When finished a butane torch will remelt the stuff to get it out of the molding and ready for use again.

Posted on: 9/26 21:50
Howard
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Re: Mike
#6
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HH56
The main difference is in the washer functions. The 54 motor is mounted in a tilted position and has the mounting for the washer co-ordinator built into the top cover. The tilt is so the co-ordinator can clear the hydraulic pump mounting bracket.

The old method for controlling the washer by reverse turning of the wiper knob is not used on the 54 system as that washer control is done electrically. The wiper switch has a button in the center of the knob for that function. Vacuum for the washer is taken from a tee in the supply line to the motor rather than being controlled by the motor slide valve. I don't remember and cannot see in the photo if the washer vacuum nipple that is on the left side of the older motors is still present on the 54. If you do not have the nipple then you can find a 54 6v electric lid for the washer if you want to have the co-ordinator and electric operation. Those are identified by a black cap over the solenoid. 12v washer lid caps are red. The jars are the same.

If you want to use the older washer without a co-ordinator it can be done without having the nipple on the motor but you will need to connect it differently. The vacuum will now be from the motor supply side and a Trico washer vacuum pushbutton or something like it that can mount under the dash edge will be the control. You could also use an electric solenoid valve in the vacuum supply line to the washer operated by the regular button or a pushbutton under the dash.

6v solenoid valves are hard to find but Amazon does have one. Have not used it so I truly do not know if it would be suitable for vacuum control or if the ports and flow rate is large enough so it would work in this situation. If you can find something different or have 12v available then there might be more options.

Attach file:



jpg  54 engine.jpg (2,023.46 KB)
209_63321abea8967.jpg 4032X3024 px

jpg  solenoid.jpg (487.42 KB)
209_63321c3e9c3f1.jpg 2502X1116 px

jpg  WS washer button.jpg (86.53 KB)
209_63321d91668c3.jpg 466X382 px

Posted on: 9/26 16:40
Howard
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Re: Packard transmission question
#7
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HH56
A standard 3 speed will only have a 1:1 output in third and can do no more. Anything acting like a kickdown sounds like the car has an Overdrive and it may have been in overdrive mode which will give a 4th ratio.

Is there a round knob under the dash edge a few inches to the right of the steering column? If so, when the knob is pushed all the way in, at about 20-25 mph the OD will automatically go into prep mode and a brief release of the accelerator will let the solenoid engage so the 4th ratio is being used. This will drop engine RPM and noise significantly.

Anytime you are actually in OD and want more power such as when you want to pass a car a quick push of the accelerator to the floor will cause the OD to release and transmission goes back into a standard ratio. When the pass is complete, releasing the accelerator will let the overdrive engage again.

Pulling the knob out locks the OD out of operation so the transmission can no longer use it and straight 1:1 in 3rd is the highest ratio usable.

Posted on: 9/26 16:09
Howard
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Re: Website
#8
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HH56
Gerd, Most of our moms probably tried to teach us that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" and I guess someone thought that was a brilliant design but this beholder apparently did not get the message on that particular implementation of beauty.

Maybe someone in charge -- even in the Soviet Union -- just had to jump in during the four light era or thought more light was needed and anything would work. Could even see the extra lights being different colors to announce someone really important was inside and coming down the road. Whatever the reason, IMO the way the added lights were fitted on the fender is jarring and leaves a lot to be desired. The original singles look so much better both in the original Packard design and in the Soviet copies..

Posted on: 9/25 16:02
Howard
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Re: Website
#9
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HH56
Quote:

John wrote:
Not one of Packard's better design concepts..... LOL

Amen! Definitely don't need to start seeing double on the nice prewar Packards. The real forced double lights set in pods on the "bug eyed" 58s are quite enough.

At least the Studebaker - Packard designers didn't have an exclusive on that front. While they didn't have pods, some of the forced dual light designs on nice sedate narrow fender RollsRoyces of the early 60s are just as jarring.

Posted on: 9/25 12:24
Howard
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Re: Packard shopping: Reyman
#10
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HH56
Quote:
On the long trim behind the doors, the trim clips have foam in them. Anyone know exactly why this is, and if it should be on other clips too? I assume just noise deadening..

Depends on exactly where on the clip the foam is located. If it is small and thick mostly being somewhat compressed between the clip and outside sheet metal it is primarily a water seal. If it is thinner and extends past the clip sides and will be kind of compressed under the clip in the molding retaining channel then it could still help with water but is mostly noise and vibration control.

Packard used clips with rubber pads or washers on them in places the clip holes were located in such a way any water running down the fenders could leak thru the holes and get into semi finished spaces. Trunk is one place or in some cases where water could get trapped in closed spaces or where they wanted to reduce any getting into the harder to drain inner body spaces. The inner door and kickpanel space is a good example where they could use water control. They typically did not use clips for strictly noise control unless they were the threaded stud with a nut type that could be tightened down to prevent any movement or noise from the molding. There is often one or two of those on the door moldings.

Packard also used rubber washers on the studs holding lettering and emblems etc. Those were often to keep water and dust from entering thru trunk holes. In some cases if the lettering was inside the car or was somewhere it could vibrate they could also be used for noise purposes. Washers were between the sheet metal and speednuts when used in those locations.

Posted on: 9/25 10:25
Howard
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