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Board index » All Posts (glentre)




Re: Seat belt installation
#1
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
I installed front three point belts and rear lap belts in our 1935 1205. Each front belt has an upper torso harness which joins behind the seat to a single detachable tether and the tether is attached to a belt retractor mounted in the trunk behind the rear seat. The rear belts are lap only.

For shows, the retractable belt can be detached from the front harness tether and the belts hidden under the front seat. The retractable belt is then wound up behind the rear seat with only the end of the buckle visible. The retractable mechanisms are mounted near the center of the car such that they do not interfere with two rear passengers when they and the front occupants are belted in.

The fronts are mounted directly to the car frame under the wood floor boards. The rear laps are mounted to a 2x2 steel angle with welded closed ends fastened with through bolts to the frame side rails. The retractable tether mechanisms are bolted to the steel floor in the trunk with the large washers supplied with the belt hardware. A slot is cut in the trunk panel behind the rear seat to allow the retractable portion of the belt to pass through.

The retractable mechanism allows the front seat occupants freedom of movement while still being strapped in in case of an accident.

Purists might criticize this installation but I have done my best to keep myself and passengers as safe as I can while still being able to hide the belts when their presence would be objectionable. I have also mounted three point retractable belts in our '31 Chrysler sedan, '31 Model A roadster and '36 Auburn boattail speedster replica

I have some photos of the installation, but have tried several times to post them here, even reducing their size to no avail. The photos seem to have been uploaded but do not appear when the preview button is selected so I guess they are not really uploaded. Suggestions?

Glen

Posted on: 11/14 18:22
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
Quote:

Owen_Dyneto wrote:
Without depressing the momentary contact switch, the gasoline gauge reads from the gas tank sending unit. When the button is pressed and held in position, it reads from the crankcase sending unit. So it appears your gas tank sending unit is in question. Wolf & Co. has been servicing these for a very long time.


Thanks for confirming my thought that the gas mode is the normal status of the gauge. The info on the service company that handles repair of the gas sending units is much appreciated.

Glen

Posted on: 8/16 9:54
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Re: My First Car Show....
#3
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
Nice car welcome at any show even with bumpers that need to be rechromed.

Any kids who show interest in our cars at a show, I always ask them if they want to get in and sit behind the wheel. This sets the hook early and makes it easier for them to get reeled in when they get older. We need to find any way we can to pass our love of old cars down to the younger generations and letting them sit in our cars is not going to damage anything. Need to make a little sign for our cars.... "Look and Touch If You Want"

Glen

Posted on: 8/16 9:39
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#4
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
One last question on the subject. Is the gas-oil level gauge in the gas mode or the oil mode when the button under the dash is not pressed? What mode is it in when it is momentarily pressed? I'm asking because when not pressed, the gauge always reads 5 and when pressed, it reads just under 25. Assuming the gauge is in gas mode when unpressed, the constant 5 reading would mean there is a likely problem with the gas tank sending unit. With the pan off the car, I tested the oil float unit and it seems to be working ok.

Glen

Posted on: 8/15 7:23
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#5
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
Yes, my '35 has a dual purpose gas-oil gauge that I did not realize until now. I took a photo but it won't load into this reply, probably because it is too large. I don't know how to reduce photo sizes.

The gauge reads 0-5-15-25 which I assume means gallons of fuel in the tank. However, what do the numbers mean with regard to measuring oil level? As mentioned, it always reads 5 whether it has a full crankcase or is empty.

I dropped the pan today and was pleased to see there was almost no sludge, just a 1/16" layer at the rear of the pan. Also, the cork float for the oil level unit is intact, attached to the sender and is not loose in the pan as I thought. However, it doesn't seem to be working properly so some troubleshooting is in order for tomorrow.

Thanks for your help.

Glen

Posted on: 8/13 17:03
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#6
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
I think I finally realize what that loose tube shaped object is in the bottom of the pan, thanks to those who responded. I was confused about what it was, having never heard of such a device in a car before. It's the oil level gauge float which apparently has come loose from the sending unit attached to the exterior of the oil pan. The serial number on the engine definitely shows it is a 1936. However, raised lettering on the bottom of the pan reads 1-16-35, indicating the pan is a 1935 mounted on a 1936 block. I also didn't realize the dash gauge is a combo unit for gas and oil which was confirmed after a careful check. I guess this is proof the '35 cars had the oil level gauge but the '36 cars did not.

The gauge does not work as the dash gauge reads 5 with the crankcase full of oil and also reads 5 when it is empty.

I guess it would be prudent to drop the pan at this point because a loose float inside a running engine could be disastrous.

Regarding the painted vs chrome radiator shells, I too have been confused on that issue. The previous owner of my 1205 said chrome was an optional extra in 1935 but I have never seen a photo of another '35 with chrome although there appear to be many chromed '34's.

Glen

Posted on: 8/13 11:50
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#7
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
Quote:

Tim Cole wrote:
Are you sure the tube shaped object isn't the float for the oil level gauge? Packard couldn't make up their minds on how to do it so they dropped it in 1936.


Tim,
Thanks for your input.

The car is a 1935 1205 with a '36 engine and it does not have an oil level gauge. For fear of breaking something, I did not pull the oil pressure unit totally out of the side of the block but was able to determine when I moved it, the mentioned loose tube in the bottom of the pan also moved. So, I assumed they were connected but perhaps not if that tube had a wire coming out of its end that might have caught on the oil pressure mechanism.

Still at a loss to understand what that tube is and if nobody chimes in by tomorrow, I will be moving on to fill the engine with oil and fire it up.

Glen

Posted on: 8/12 11:59
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
I removed the oil pressure unit on the side of the pan which is in line with and close to the oil drain plug. It seems the loose tube I described above is attached to the oil sending unit, although I don't understand how it works.

Based on the fact a boroscope shows the pan to be free of sludge as far as the scope will go into the pan and the oil pickup screen is clean plus the fact I was sent the wrong oil pan gasket set, I have decided to not drop the pan but to put the new screw-on filter in the reproduction oil filter can, fill with new oil and start her up. Just hope I have not messed up anything in the oil sending unit and that the gauge will show proper oil pressure when I crank up the engine. I guess the proper procedure would be to disconnect the coil wire, turn off the fuel pump and crank the engine for a minute or so to get the oil filter and the repro can it is mounted in full of oil before firing the engine. I'm running blind here with no Packard experience and hope there would have been more input from knowledgeable Packard folks on this forum.

Is there another Packard forum a newbie like me should be using for these kinds of questions instead of this one?

Glen

Posted on: 8/12 5:46
 Top 


Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#9
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
Tim Cole,
Thanks for your reply. I was able to pry off the oil screen with picks as you suggested and it is perfectly clean. Just a thin layer of sludge on the inside bottom of the screen cap. With a finger into the oil plug hole, I found a tube shaped object lying loose in the bottom of the pan, about 3/4" in diameter and some 3" long. Can't tell if it's attached to anything. Using a boroscope, it looks like the object might be an oil pickup tube as it appears to have a screen around it but is difficult to tell. If it's a screen, it looks completely clogged. Can you tell me what that object is and why it would be unattached on the bottom of the pan?

I appreciate any input you can give.

Glen

Posted on: 8/10 17:04
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#10
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

glentre
With some 130 reviews and no replies to my question about the oil screen and dropping the oil pan, I have decided to not try to get the screen off for fear of damaging something. Also not going to drop the pan for further inspection even though the old oil was dark before I drained it. The reason is the bottom pickup part of the screen is clean and free of any sludge. The screen cover and the hollow in the pan drain nut only had a thin coating of sludge with no metal chips. The car has a reproduction oil filter can with a modern spin-on filter inside and that will be changed with a new one. Was really hoping someone more knowledgeable than me would have replied with some advice.

Glen

Posted on: 8/9 7:08
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