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Board index » All Posts (Chiefdan)




Re: Tire size
#1
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Hankook Kinergy ST H735 225/75R15 102T WW Tire (QTY 4)
These are available on Ebay right now at $422 for a set of four. Not sure they are in current production but the seller has 40 of them in stock. Simple tire has them also but $45 more.
I looked into the Nexen but I found a bunch of complaints about whitewalls going brown so I have decided on the Hancooks.

Posted on: 1/24 21:57
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Re: Tire size
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Jim. I was out in my garage today putting on 00 gauge battery cables (big difference) and measured the G78 tires on there now. They are 8.5" wide. I found some Hancook touring tires in 225/75R15 on Ebay and they measure exactly the same as what I have on the car now. I can get the rears off by jacking from the frame and not the axle so I know they will fit. Four narrow whitewalls for $422 including shipping sounds like the best deal available at this point
Jerome suggested Hancook H724 but I think these have been replaced by H735 so I will be ordering these this week.

Posted on: 1/24 16:29
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Tire size
#3
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Sometime before spring I need to put new tires on my 1951 200 Deluxe Touring sedan. I am looking at the narrow whitewall radials to keep the price reasonable. My spare is a really old 760-15 I think and the tires on it now are G-78 bias-ply. They look OK but you have to jack up the car at the frame to remove the rears.
The conversion charts are not consistent. What size modern tires should I be looking at?

Posted on: 1/20 9:50
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Re: Need help on identifying this part
#4
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Quote:

Kenken wrote:
Do you possibly have any idea of what it came off of if it's not a Packard
This electric fuel pump is a generic hot rod part and not for any specific automobile. They are still available at Summit Racing or other parts stores. From what I have read an electric fuel pump was added by owners to some Packards to get fuel quickly to the carburetor for quicker starts or to overcome vapor lock in the fuel line.
If your mechanical fuel pump and fuel system is good you shouldn't need an electric pump. Original fuel pumps are available from the Packard suppliers or can be rebuilt. I rebuilt mine with parts from Now and Then Automotive but they will also rebuild them. Yours should look something like this:

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Posted on: 1/15 23:52
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Re: Need help on identifying this part
#5
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Stewart-Warner electric fuel pump. Probably not going to use it on your project. You should have a mechanical fuel pump on the Packard engine.

Posted on: 1/15 23:31
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Re: IT
#6
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Quote:

Wat_Tyler wrote:
Congratulations!!!


You didn't mention it/them, but TIRES!!! You'll need to reskin it before going out of the neighborhood. Man, I ran some crap way back when. Never again!!!
TIRES! I don't need no stinking tires! Put on the car circa 1990 so if they lasted this long they must be ok. OK, MAYBE I need new sneakers. I found some Diamond back wide whitewall radials in 225/75R15 for $1108. This seems to be the best deal going unless someone has a better idea

Posted on: 1/13 19:45
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Re: IT
#7
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
"Also can you tell us more about replacing the pinion seal? I have to do that sometime." Pinion seal on Ultramatic equipped 1951 Packard: First remove the lower drain plug on the rear axle and drain old fluid. Next there are two roughly U shaped clips inboard of the outer part of the U-joint. One leg is peened over so you straighten that little leg and pull the clip(s) out with a screwdriver. This lets the bearing caps come out and then the U-joint can be manipulated out and driveshaft dropped. Put a short 2x4 under the driveshaft at the frame X to keep it up out of the way.
Now the fun part. I used a sharp center punch to mark the pinion yoke, the nut and the shaft all in a row for use when re-installing. After trying various bars with extensions, I gave up and used a 1/2" impact at 120#. Still nothing. Tried penetrating oil and some heat from a propane torch on the nut. This seemed to do the trick and the nut loosened. I had already counted the threads showing (2) on the shaft but I also counted the turns to remove the nut. (9+). That is when it got fun. The seal is cone shaped to the outside so there is very little room to get anything between the shaft and the seal. I tried drilling and screws but couldn't move the seal at all. Finally out of desperation I cut the protruding part of the seal out with a small air rotary cut off tool. That gave me room to put a screwdriver with a bend at the tip between the seal and the bearing and pry the seal out.
By then I had had enough fun and cleaned up and quit for the day.
The next day, with a little blue RTV around the outside the new seal tapped in with no trouble. ( I soaked the seal in oil for several days first ). Oiled the pinion shaft and slid the yoke on so my marks lined up and it went into the same spline as before. Put the nut on and tightened it with the 1 1/4" socket as tight as possible with a breaker bar and went back to the impact for the final 1/4 turn. The impact ran out of steam at about where my marks on the nut and shaft were in line so that was it. My U clips were a little out of shape so I straightened them in the vice until they fit the U-joint bearing caps correctly. The bearing caps have a screwdriver slot on the outer cover and this slot has to be parallel to the way the clips tap in for the clips to follow their intended path. Put the drive shaft back in and tapped the clips in with a ball peen hammer and bent over the one leg that sticks out. Re-install the lower drain plug and refill with fluid thru upper plug hole. I used 85-90 lube. This took me two afternoons but I am sure I could do It much faster the second time but I am sincerely hoping there will be no next time. Best of luck with your project, I hope this amateur tutorial helps. Dan

Posted on: 1/13 19:25
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IT'S ALIVE
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
I rescued this 1951 200 Deluxe touring sedan from a 27 year hibernation in October. It has just over 30K original miles on it and no rust anywhere. Thanks to all the advice I got on this forum it is now running and driveable. Just would like to make a few comments on what I have done so far:
The brakes were a mess anywhere the fluid sat for years so I replaced the lines, rubber hoses, master cylinder and wheel cylinders. Hardest part was removing the rear brake drums. Don't even start this project without the 3 legged puller that attaches to the wheel lugs and you hit with a (large) hammer.
Followed the procedure recommended for starting an engine after long-term storage with oil in the cylinders and turning over by hand for a few days. Got It running with a remote lawn mower gas tank with rubber line running into the carb.
Rebuilt the fuel pump with a kit from Now and Then auto parts. A video they have on UTube was very helpful.
Fuel tank had half an inch of crud on the bottom but was in excellent shape so I pressure washed it and then put a large chain inside and shook it around until it loosened all the remaining scale. A new fuel sending unit was in order so a 1957 Ford sedan unit was acquired and installed
Replacing the rear pinion seal was not exactly fun for a 77 year old guy laying on a creeper under the car. Getting the seal out was a bear but it is done and new fluid added.
Got all the gauges working, temperature needed a sending unit and the oil pressure light needed just a bulb. I noticed the other day that the battery cables were only 4 gauge so I ordered a set of 00 gauge from a seller on Ebay for $53 with shipping. The car starts fine but the starter kicks out of engagement occasionally so I am hoping the correct battery cables will help.
Now that I got the car running and stopping I took it for a drive down the road a few hundred yards and back. Left a huge cloud of smoke when I took off but I think this will improve when I am able to get it out on the highway. Steers much better than I expected with no power steering and I don't think I have to worry much about spinning the rear wheels.
My next project is the seats. There is a long rip in the bottom of the front seat as well as just behind the driver. I did find the proper original material but it is $130 per yard! I found some really nice dark grey weave upholstery fabric at a local fabric store and it was $18 per yard. As this car is going to be a survivor/driver I could not justify the cost of the original wool. I found an old Singer straight stitch sewing maching on Facebook marketplace and am going to give it a go.
Sorry this is long-winded but it's January in Western New York so I have time. Thanks to all the guys who posted on this forum on how to trouble shoot problems and how to fix others. Dan

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Posted on: 1/13 13:47
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Packard
#9
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
My 1951 200 Deluxe Touring sedan is very original down to the decal below the ignition switch. Not sure how many of you have seen this decal but I thought it was cool and decided to share.
Happy Holidays, Dan

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Posted on: 12/19 19:08
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Re: Rebuild/replace fuel pump
#10
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Chiefdan
Got my parts from Then and Now Automotive. My pump was a dual action Carter. Kit was very complete and included everything except a couple springs you re-use. The company also has a couple excellent videos on U-Tube that helped a lot. Works on the bench and I should know this weekend if everything works as it should. Not rocket science but not in the easy as pie category either. Good luck.

Posted on: 12/8 15:50
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