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Board index » All Posts (2652562256825687)




Re: How do I measure how much can be milled off 1951 288 head?
#1
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
I would NOT mill more than .030" off the head. you will loose breathability in the crossover area. Are you milling because of pitting, flatness, or because you think you're going to get a significant increase in comp. ratio? If the latter, there will barely be a discernable difference. If you've got performance experience you might notice a difference/ Most will not. It was a good running engine as designed and with the fuel that was available. The flathead design has it's limitations.

Posted on: 6/5 18:36
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Re: Rear axle help (54-55)
#2
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
What is shown in your pic of the bearing race (cup) is "spalling". That is metal fatigue, not rust pits. You need a new bearing and race. Your current bearing and race is a failure waiting to happen. First,the diff will start to growl, and then maybe a bearing roller pops out of the cage and finds its way in between the pinion and ring gear. Then you've got all sorts of problems. And expense. Do it once,and do it right.

Posted on: 6/5 18:03
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Re: 1954 Packard rear end differential
#3
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
Many moons ago we used 90w pure mineral gear oil, in diffs, which is what it was designed for. You should be fine with 85/140, like was said above, or a RedLine "heavy" lube. Just a note of caution, the modern EP (extreme pressure) additives, over time, will degrade brass or bronze, so be wary of bushings
or maybe side gear spacers etc. in application. pb

Posted on: 5/20 19:40
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Re: starter questions
#4
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
Quote:

HH56 wrote:
Quote:
'55 was + grd. and '56 was - grd.

True but the way the starter field coils and armature are internally connected if a change in polarity occurs both items also change at the same time so the magnetic relationship and rotation direction stays the same. Generators and ammeters do care as they typically need repolarizing and reversing connections on the ammeter before they will charge or read properly after a polarity swap. Regulators are another item that might care and coils work better with a change of connections to match polarity but will still work if left alone.

As a point of information as evidenced by all the accidental or sometimes on purpose changing of pre 56 cars to negative ground to accommodate modern radios or cell phones, starters and other electric motors Packard used as an original part do not care about polarity.


I forgot, with wire wound magnets it won't matter. but, with a permanent magnet starter it WILL reverse rotation. PB

Posted on: 5/20 19:25
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Re: starter questions
#5
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
'55 was + grd. and '56 was - grd.

Posted on: 5/19 19:06
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Re: Rear axle help (54-55)
#6
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
Just a tip. If your going to remove the nut as in the picture, swap the adjustable wrench to the left side of the yoke, so the bench backs it up. You exert more leverage when the wrenches are over one another. Use a machinist scale or depth mike to measure from end of pinion to face of nut and use a prick punch to "pip" mark the nut and face of pinion shaft for alignment. When re-assembled you should check pinion end play anyway. The bearings could be worn enough so that they wouldn't have the proper pre-load even if you do "count your turns". PB

Posted on: 4/28 9:06
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Re: Rear axle help (54-55)
#7
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
1/2" impact, either air or one of those 20 volt battery jobs, and heat. Let Blaster soak for A day. Heat nut on 1 or 2 flats with propane torch or small oxy/acet torch, and use impact. PB

Posted on: 4/27 16:49
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Re: hph's 400
#8
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
Quote:

kevinpackard wrote:
Of the cars I've seen, I tend to prefer the black lines on the side trim. It seems to look more finished. How would you go about adding them? Paint pen, marker?


Buegler striper worked for me. Just need the correct size wheel.

Posted on: 4/19 14:26
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Re: hph's 55 Clipper Project
#9
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
Here is a short vid about brake shoe arcing. That's how we did drum brake jobs through the 70's. You got full shoe contact with the drum and didn't have to wait for the shoes to wear in. It was most important when cutting the drum oversized. With the advent of disc brakes on the front axle and drums on the rear, it became less important, mostly because braking imbalance would be felt more in the steering wheel and sometimes you could not adjust it out. You would have to wait for the shoes to wear in.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-ZF200ZSVs

Posted on: 4/17 19:21
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Re: hph's 55 Clipper Project
#10
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

packardbill
If the drums are not heat checked, cracked, or scored, I would probably not have them cut. You should measure them though, to see of they are already beyond usable limit. If you do have them cut, the proper thing to do is have the shoes "arced" to fit the drum, so when they are adjusted up you have proper shoe to drum contact. You might have some difficulty finding a shop that can "arc" the shoes. Only us old bastards used to do that.
Also, "primary brake shoe" (short) goes to the front, or the main rotation of the wheel. If the main rotation was reverse, the "primary", or short shoe would go to the rear. Unless, of course, you are working on a Chrysler with upper and lower wheel cylinders, then both shoes would be the same. Good luck.PB

p.s. check your upper and lower pins and bushings as well as kingpins and bushings, while you have the wheels off.

Posted on: 4/15 12:12
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