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Board index » All Posts (Scott_Noga)




Re: LED brake light/turn signal bar
#1
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Scott
Quote:

HH56 wrote:
Has anyone with the two bulb tail light housings which use the separate turn signal bulb switched to LEDs? If so was it a noticeable improvement? 41-2 conventional and the Clipper based cars thru 22nd series used this two bulb arrangement. While the single LED bulb in the 23rd series housing doing both functions is quite nice, am curious on earlier cars with the dual bulbs if the turn signal flashing above the brake light could still be seen very well if the much brighter brake light was on. With incandescent bulbs the turn signal is visible in daylight but IMO, a bit weak.

The photo is of a Clipper thru 22nd series car with the horizontal split housing and shared lens.

I have not found a working solution to this arrangement. Using the solid state flasher (which by itself improved brightness) I've tried several different models of equivalent to original polarity-insensitive LED bulbs and they appear to all have crossfeed problems through the lamps with the internal circuitry. For instance, even with just the fronts switched to LED the rear operation is all messed up, with brake, park and turn lamps not operating normally.

Posted on: 4/15 12:49
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#2
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Scott
Quote:

53 Cavalier wrote:
I think if you're trying to get a little more HP, this should do the trick.


No need for a higher compression head with that big air pump on it. I don't think that will be much help with fuel economy.

Posted on: 1/31 0:24
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#3
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Scott
I have found some iron heads from 22nd series and later -- at least three 288 heads, a 327 and a 356, plus one mystery HC head with no displacement indication. I assume HC is high compression, but oddly the combustion chamber is much deeper on this head. It also doesn't have the flat center ridge running front to back. Anybody have info on what this HC head is intended for?

Click to see original Image in a new window


Also, any way to distinguish a 327MT vs. 327AT head?

Click to see original Image in a new window

Posted on: 1/30 13:57
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#4
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Scott
Quote:

su8overdrive wrote:
Avoid aluminum head. Even with modern corrosion inhibitors, Red Line Water Water or No-Rosion, they are trouble. What's ridiculous are the guys who then polish aluminum heads until they gleam, which reduces surface area and cooling efficacy.

As described, Packard already suggested what owners wanting a trace more oomph could do. Skip the cowboy crap, don't reinvent the wheel. Get the engine right, "factory standard."


They are like hens teeth. I asked about the compression ratio they provided as another data point as to what was run on the 356 in the past. Although the head looks flashy having dissimilar metals with different expansion rates joined together increases the chances of seal/gasket failures as well.

Anybody know what the CR was for these heads? I've not yet seen evidence that there were different Edmunds Packard heads for the 288/327/356/359 8 engines, just one. If so, that would give different CR for the different engines which doesn't make much sense. Anybody have information, or know what CR one got with it on the 356?

Posted on: 1/10 15:19
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#5
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Scott
Just curious. Anyone know what the Edmunds aluminum head did for the 356 in terms of compression ratio?

Posted on: 1/9 22:40
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#6
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Scott
Quote:

Keep it simple. Don't reinvent the wheel. Factory standard. Get to work. Packard knew what they were doing.


That's generally true, but back in the late 40's automotive gasoline was about 72 octane (AKI). In the 50's it was around 80. It continued to increase until it peaked at 90 in 1974. It's currently running around 87. Consider what Packard had to accommodate in the design. Compression ratios increased industry-wide as octane increased. From the '48 Packard at 6.85, a '54 Packard had 8.70 compression. A '56 Packard V8 had 10.0 compression (which required premium / "ethyl").

BTW, there's a movement to eliminate multigrade gasoline and settle on a single grade of 95-97 so manufacturers can all take advantage of even higher compression ratios, which are now averaging about 10.5 but they want to go even higher for greater efficiency.

Today's regular at 87 is a long way from the 76 of 1948, so a 1948 engine can benefit from a CR bump and run more efficiently.

Edit: Trivia note -- Union 76 gas stations got their name from the octane rating of their premium "ethyl" gasoline back when they originated in 1935, 76, which had a patriotic sound to it alluding to the year 1776, hence Union 76.

Posted on: 12/31 18:16
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#7
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Scott
The '49 Golden Anniversary Std 8 (288) w/OD I used to own gave me up to 20mpg but that was on long trips that were all freeway. Mixed it was around 16-18mpg. I had rebuilt the engine (it had low compression prior to) and custom made a set of leaner metering rods for the carburetor and ignition was set not by spec but by ear (which was more advanced than book but that's why they had the "octane adjuster" Vernier scale on the distributor). Interestingly it actually did better at 70mph than at 55-60mph and that's where I would get the 20mpg. Packard offered different metering rods for the Carter carbs to enrich or lean from stock and I had managed to find the specs on them. One can change the metering jets but that changes the entire range whereas the optional rods had different profiles, not just fatter. In this way one can for example keep acceleration about the same but lean cruise.

My '48 Custom 356 w/OD is more like 13mpg in mixed driving (mostly freeway). I haven't messed with the metering rods in it yet but am contemplating bumping the CR before experimenting with mixture and ignition.

Posted on: 12/31 10:57
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#8
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Scott
I've revised the straight 8 compression ratio document to be less confusing. I suggest replacing the existing one with the attached one.

Would still like to know what the distinguishing marks are, if any, on the '48-'52 327 manual transmission head to differentiate it from the others.

Attach file:


pdf Packard_Straight_8_Compression_Ratios.pdf Size: 453.75 KB; Hits: 170

Posted on: 12/30 17:52
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#9
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Scott
Quote:

Ross wrote:
The chart is confusing. The first column describes which engine the head is FROM. The next columns give the compression ratio that results if that head is installed on the other engines.


That is confusing, but I see it now. So a '48-'52 327 head will bring the 356 from 6.85 to 7.53. Anything else would be excessive for a flathead running regular.
Note that I'm not thinking in terms of HP, per se, but as I said, efficiency. I would expect fuel economy to be improved a little.

What are the distinguishing marks on the '48-'52 327 head to differentiate it from the others?

Posted on: 12/30 0:37
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
 Top 


Re: 356 CI Compression Ratio
#10
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Scott

Posted on: 12/29 19:09
1942 Clipper Club Sedan
1948 Custom Touring Sedan (22nd Series)
1955 Patrician Sedan
1955 400 Sedan
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