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Board index » All Posts (DavidPackard)




Re: '38 1608 V12 Project
#1
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DavidPackard
The Evans website reports freeze protection to -40 F, which is also -40 C.

I've never used the product because my old cars are not completely leak free, but the high boiling point is quite appealing. Perhaps in the future.

dp

Posted on: 2/10 14:32
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Re: Amazing site w/ OD parts, 6 & 12 Volt Gens, Alternators, etc
#2
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DavidPackard
64avanti

I believe Joe Wareham's blog 'Joe's '49 Club Sedan' has a discussion on the OD parts in use on his car.

dp

Posted on: 2/8 22:38
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Re: 282 head unknown hole size
#3
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DavidPackard
Jerry;
I thought most temperature gauges before the war were mechanical, and inserted a bulb into the engine, in the case of Packard, in the aft portion of the cylinder head. The bulb would typically have a sealing ring or gasket to inhibit water leaks placed between the engine casting and the bulb flange. The threaded gland nut would ‘push’ onto the bulb’s flange and subsequently compress the sealing ring/gasket. Ok if that’s the design that Packard used before the advent of electric water temperature gauges, then the gland nut threads would not be tapered, because the intimate contact between the bulb and nut would not be guaranteed with tapered threads.

This business of using mechanical temperature gauges extended to at least the mid 50’s. As a young man I owned a ’55 Chevy, and that car surely had a mechanical gauge. The shop manual for that car talks about an ‘O’ ring . . . no mention of material . . . to seal the bulb . . . I just looked it up.

If the car is/was equipped with a mechanical temperature my vote would be the threads are not tapered, and therefore not NPT. 3/8 pipe would have 18 TPI with a diameter about 0.675 (remember it’s tapered), which would be something like 0.050 larger than Howard’s recommendation of 5/8 X 18 UNF.

dp

Posted on: 1/31 16:56
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Re: Manual Transmission Clicking Noise
#4
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DavidPackard
TimE: I too commend you on the depth of your investigation. I word of caution however would be the faith you might have in your cage speed calculations in that the radial load on the bearing has a significant impact on the actual cage speed, along with lubrication specifics.

I’ve been reading all of my old ‘Motor’s Manuals’ but haven’t found an easy answer . . . sorry. Actually the trouble shooting guides in the transmissions section were dropped sometime in the late ‘40s or early ‘50s.

Now for a round of ‘twenty questions’:

Is the car equipped with an ‘Econo-Drive’, aka overdrive?

May I assume the first/reverse slider rotates only when the output shaft is rotating, but in your idle case the slider was not rotating, yet the ticking was present? There was no mention whether the noise was present in reverse. I guess I assumed when you used the term ‘idle’; one the car was not moving, two the transmission was in neutral, and finally the first/reverse slider was not rotating? If this is TRUE then everything was rotating except for the first/reverse slider and the output shaft. And then when the clutch was depressed all of the rotation was brought to rest just as you said.


When the clutch is depressed, and the vehicle speed is zero, then all elements within the transmission should come to rest eventually . . . perhaps a few seconds with warm oil, and the normal warm idle speed. The next diagnostic test might be; establish a forward speed in first, and confirm the ticking noise is present. Then with the car still rolling depress the clutch, and note whether the noise is present. If the car is equipped with an overdrive let’s conduct this test twice, once with the OD mechanically enabled (cable IN), and again with the OD mechanically disabled (cable OUT). Considering the noise is also present in second gear this test should be repeated in that gear also. That would make a total of four test cases. To Chris’ point, the purpose of this test sequence would be to isolate whether the noise is generated by the transmission. If the ticking is still there when the car is moving forward (clutch depressed) and it stops only when you brake to a stop.

I’m thinking about the countershaft (aka cluster gear) thrust bearings (bronze washers), and whether the entire cluster gear has excessive fore/aft motion. It looks like there would be an axial force, proportional to torque, on the cluster gear except when the transmission is in third gear. I’m trying to make a connection between cluster gear axial position and the ticking. I haven’t found the service limits on the cluster gear clearance.

Finally, if the ticking is interference between a rotating part and the stationary case then you might find magnetic wear metal in the oil. Same would be TRUE if the 2nd gear cluster and the 1st gear main were interfering. I believe there are drain plugs with a built-in magnetics that might help determine if a gear to gear, or a gear to case interference is causing the noise.

That’s all I’ve got tonight . . . By the way try to catch the TV news tonight or tomorrow. You should see a segment about snow in the northern sections of Phoenix today. We had a bit, but not a lot, of graupel where I live.

dp

Posted on: 1/25 21:59
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Re: Ultrasonic Cleaner Rust removal
#5
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DavidPackard
I’m sure we all have a cache of red stuff to get rid of, so thanks for starting this thread. I’m currently a fan of Evapo-Rust purely for the simplicity of use, but it takes quite a while to finish the job. Perhaps those that use an electrolysis process can fill-in some details on that method.

I do had a question about the ZipLoc bag technique, “Is the top of the bag sealed and also held above the normal cleaning fluid level, or once sealed the top of the bag is allowed to go wherever it wants to go?” Kevin’s comment suggests the top of the sealed plastic bag is held above the waterline.

dp

Posted on: 1/21 21:26
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Re: '38 1608 V12 Project
#6
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DavidPackard
So far I've used mine for only cleaning carburetors. Simple Green and water was used per the instructions that came with the unit. I kept cleaning and cleaning until the cleaner would run for one hour without darkening the solution. I must say the first few times the solution will darken in less than 10 minutes . . . and maybe 'darken' is a bit too polite, because the first time the solution was more black than just darkened. I normally use a solution temperature on the high side, and cleaned the 'crud' off the outside of the carburetor with lacquer thinner before it went into the drink. My goal was to let the US cleaner do its thing on the passages that would be otherwise inaccessible, and not have to clean the easy to remove the 'crud' on the outside. On the internet there are parts baskets that look like small spheres made of stainless screening. The spheres open to allow the adding the small parts, and then lock closed. All you have to do is to throw the basket into the cleaner, and the parts don't disappear.

If anyone has used an ultrasonic cleaner with Evapo-Rust let us know the results.

dp

Posted on: 1/6 17:13
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Re: Vintage Packards on the Street Thread...
#7
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DavidPackard
With respect to the '55 - '56 Ford comment . . . from the front the easiest way to tell would be, round turn signal lens = 1955, rectangular turn signal lens = 1956.

Posted on: 12/29 21:54
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#8
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DavidPackard
Kevin, that's a difficult question to answer. I noticed in the 'Coming together' photo the same gasket seems to be 'hanging-out' over its entire outer edge as you said. Perhaps it's nothing more that the manufacturer of the kit made the decision to have a gasket that would be more robust if it shifted a bit. Not only would there still be gasket material available to seal, but a wider gasket would be less likely to shift in the first place. There is no harm with the gasket 'hanging-out' on the outside of the carburetor. If it somehow degrades and starts falling apart no ill effects would arise. So let's talk about the '20201208_071831.jpg' photo . . . that gasket appears to be in the engine's inlet air stream, and as such if degradation occurs a benign situation may not be guaranteed. When I first saw this photo I went out to the garage and unpacked my spare WDO, which is not the same design as yours, but it is a Carter two barrel produced only a few years before. In that carburetor the gasket is not visible, it does not protrude into the air stream. Since my experience with WGD is limited I would ask those with that experience to weigh-in on whether it's normal for the gasket to protrude into the air stream . . . I know the answer for the WDO.

dp

Posted on: 12/17 21:22
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#9
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DavidPackard
Kevin, in your posting #454 the photo looking straight into the throat of the carb I see quite a bit of air horn gasket. It looks different than what I was expecting. I know getting the vacumeter piston and link to play well with the gasket can be a challenge.

dp

Posted on: 12/16 21:21
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Re: KPack's 1954 Panama
#10
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DavidPackard
Seems that Kevin's carburetor is also missing the fast idle link, the choke trip lever (that's the part in Tinman's photo), and the choke piston link. If the fast idle link is AWOL then the choke connector rod is also likely missing. The link and rod should have been visible in Kevin's 'Finished rebuild 2' photo in post 456, but they are missing.

It looks that what the carburetor was configured with a manual choke a lot of Carter's automatic choke hardware was removed. My immediate concern is the loss of the high idle feature. There may be climate conditions where the engine will start but either immediately stall, or run really rich because the throttle is not reset to high idle during warm-up. Kevin can ultimately determine when unloading is necessary, so in my mind that Carter hardware is optional.

I've attached a file containing the US Patent 2,402,361 (see Tinman's photo). The operation of the automatic choke, fast idle, and vacuum/air flow/full throttle unloading are discussed in the disclosure.

dp

Attach file:


pdf Size: 439.19 KB; Hits: 3

Posted on: 12/16 13:05
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