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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#11
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Owen_Dyneto
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Might you mean Bob Aller, retired service manager from Packard-St. Louis as I recall? He did my pump and several others.

I'm not aware of hearing ever of any problems with the L-head eight oil pumps sucking air, though the stories of that on the V8 are certainly plentiful.

Posted on: 2007/10/15 8:26
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#12
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Brenda
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Glad to hear this about the non detergent oil. I had Valvoline change my oil to 10 w 30. Within less than 300 miles the oil is black black black. It looked really clean when I changed it. Would you all suggest taking 10w30 out and replacing it with 15w40? It had been sitting for 7 years, maybe all the gunk settled during that time.

Posted on: 2018/8/20 15:17
1953 Packard Clipper Deluxe
She starts on the first crank in the morning and purrs like a kitten all day.
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#13
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Owen_Dyneto
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My foremost recommendation would be to drop and clean the oil pan and oil pump intake screen.

Posted on: 2018/8/20 16:23
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#14
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Ernie Vitucci
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Brenda...I agree with Owen...to have your oil turn black that quickly means that you have gunk in the bottom of your oil pan and the oil pick up for your oil pump might well be partially clogged as well...Ernie in Arizona

Posted on: 2018/8/20 20:04
Caretaker of the 1949-288 Deluxe Touring Sedan
'Miss Prudence' and the 1931 Model A Ford Tudor 'Miss Princess'
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#15
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FREDERICK E WILEY
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Use Classic Car Motor Oil. Google it. It has everything our old cars need. My 1948 deluxe was tapping when I received it., I dropped and cleaned the pan and added this oil. The noise stopped.

Posted on: 2018/8/20 20:59
Fred in Florida







1948 Deluxe Eight Sedan 2262
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#16
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Joe D'Agostino
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One thing that has always intrigued me is the fact that all oils, regardless of mineral or synthetic and regardless of weight, fall into the same viscosity zone once they become heated. Please see the chart attached here. The viscosity is tightly grouped in the 10 to 18 range regardless of multi-weight or single weight. The same is true for synthetics.

All oils start off at widely different viscosities but end up close to each other once hot.

As we know, 90% of engine wear occurs at startup due to lack of oil on the bearings and other parts of the engine.

Straight weight oils have viscosity of around 200 at room temperature. Multi-weights are better. But most oils do not flow well at room temperature. All have somewhat limited flow characteristics.

We also know that lubrication comes from oil movement and not necessarily pressure.

So I would think that we should want as much oil movement as possible as early as possible after the dry start.

We also know that the synthetics are much better in this area than the mineral oils. A 0w-40 synthetic has a room temperature viscosity of about 60 or 70 which is much lower than any multi weight mineral oil.

I know that some of the experts will say that we should never put a 0 weight oil in our cars but if the viscosity of the 0 weight is 60 or 70 at room temperature, that is still 6 or 7 times the viscosity of the oil when it is hot.

Since all oils tend to flatten out in the same viscosity region at operating temperature, it would make sense that we all use the lightest weight multi-weight oil to get the best lubrication at startup.
After warm up, we will be getting the same lubrication at operating temperature from all oils as we can see from their viscosity plots.

In other words, why wait for the oil to thin out at 70 or 80 degrees C to get the best oil flow? Why not start with better oil flow at a lower temperature? After all, they are all ending up at roughly the same viscosity.

I just had my engine rebuilt and the rebuilder told me to use straight 30 weight mineral oil for diesel engines with zddp. While I liked the suggestion of the zddp, the flow of this oil is around 200 at 75 degrees F. I followed his recommendation for the first 1000 miles but then I switched to classic car motor oil 15w-40 since it is thinner at room temperature (it is a mineral oil and also has the zddp).
I realize that the cam lobes in our Packards are rather low in height and we may not really need the zddp but I like it for added protection.

I realize that some old engines with lots of miles on them need some thickness in the oil for protection. Couldn't this be achieved with a multi-weight synthetic that can be purchased with a thicker upper value?

I post this as food for thought.

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Posted on: 2018/8/21 20:14
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#17
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bkazmer
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what your seeing is design intent, not a coincidence. Multiviscosity oils have polymers dissolved in them. The goal is to have low viscosity cold, but still adequate viscosity hot. So putting in a non-modified low viscosity oil will help cold lubrication, but will not provide adequate hot lubrication.

Posted on: 2018/8/22 8:01
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#18
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Joe D'Agostino
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Thank you. I don't think anyone is suggesting that we use a non modified low viscosity oil.

Both synthetic and mineral oils are modified to provide fluidity at lower temperatures.

A 10W-30 multi-grade mineral based oil is made from a 10 grade oil and has VI improvers added to thicken the product in a 212 F engine. It acts as a 30 grade oil when hot

A 10W-30 synthetic oil is based on a 30 grade oil. This is unlike the counterpart mineral oil based on a 10 grade oil. There is no VI improver needed. The oil is already correct for the normal operating temperature of 212 F.

A main advantage that the synthetic has over the mineral based oil is the ability to lubricate at startup. Both types of oil have the same specifications at 104 F and 212 F

The manufacturers say that synthetic oils are more stable in a hot engine

I am not using synthetic yet. Just trying to understand the benefits and potential pitfalls

Posted on: 2018/8/22 11:12
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#19
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bkazmer
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synthetics are more stable in high temperature and high stress conditions but our old low revving, low compression , naturally aspirated engines not in that category.

Posted on: 2018/8/22 12:47
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Re: Which Engine Oil?
#20
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Tobs
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I asked the author of a book about chosing an oil for my 53 clipper, and he reccomended 10w40.
Here is a link to the post, and also his book.
my blog


I run dino oil, and change it before each winter.

Posted on: 2018/8/22 14:53
1953 Clipper Delux Club Sedan, 1969 912, 1990 Miata, 2009 Ford S-Max.
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