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'40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#1
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tsherry
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I'm thinking a winter project, like I need another one. I'll be pulling the worn out engine in the '40 110 and replacing it with the good-running engine from a '47 Clipper that I bought last year. I won't be using the Clipper transmission as the '40 has overdrive.

Is there a procedure written down for engine removal? Is it best to pull engine and trans together, or can I leave the trans in the car and just pull the engine?

Thanks for any advice.

Posted on: 9/26 22:38
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#2
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PackardDon
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I’ve always removed engines with the transmissions attached but it typically means removing the entire front clip. There is a mostly rebuilt 1940 110 engine for sale on my Packard / IMPERIAL page in the Classified Ads.

Posted on: 9/27 1:33
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#3
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Tim Cole
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If you have a girder in your garage you can take it up and roll the car out from under the motor and trans. You can pull the radiator to have enough room to leave the trans in place. You can roll it under a tree with a good strong limb and do it that way. The entire front can be lifted away with an engine hoist, but 40 is a pain because the wiring goes directly to the lights without a junction block as in 1941. So to avoid that you can pull the radiator shell, radiator, and radiator support and pull it out the front the same way as some modern vans and trucks. I wont mention using a pit because they aren't around anymore, but using one gets the whole unit out in 45 minutes.

Soak everything in penetrating oil for a week before starting.

Posted on: 9/27 16:32
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#4
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flackmaster
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I was unaware of the wiring issue noted, notwithstanding that, pull the clip. You'll have better/safer access. Just a matter of finding where to put the clip...

Posted on: 9/27 21:37
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#5
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Darrin180
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All 1940 Packards have a junction block on the left inner fender panel about 6" back from the radiator......

Posted on: 9/27 23:50
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#6
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Tim Cole
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Saying something applies to all Packards is a risky declaration. I've seen original 6th series cars with 3rd series steering wheels, 7th series cars with 8th series steering wheels, I've never seen a 6th series car with the original Deluxe hood ornament. I saw an 11th series touring car with 9th series door panels. I never saw the VIN number but it may have been transferred by a dealer. Usually fakes have doors from the small eight on the big eight chassis. Hollingsworth claimed that some 18th series 160 convertible sedans had 120 doors. I've never seen an original one so I don't have an opinion about that. The car I was talking about was involved in a collision at some point and may have had some 39 parts on it. To properly time the ignition I had to remove the fender pan to see the flywheel access hole and I specifically recall I couldn't take the thing off because the wiring harness went through the darn thing, so I had to lay it aside and work that way. Some of those cars didn't have sealed beams and maybe it was converted. Yes I have seen 18th series cars with the junction block, and the parts books says fenders supports are not bolted to the radiator support. I've seen 18th series cars with cellular radiators (that's in the parts book). But I don't know why there are two splash apron types - the one piece pain kind and the two piece easy kind. I remember a 37 Su8 convertible sedan with the V-12 body and that was original. I've never seen another like it. Nothing is absolute with capricious Packard. Consider the green engine color. That's a great argument. And painted radiator shells on production 30-34 eights - never found a verifiable period picture of one. Oh, it's shown in the parts book, but that is a reprint from who knows where and when and the brochure shows painted radiator shells. I have Chevrolet materials with those sorts of anomalies. Yet, nowadays chrome radiator shells are becoming a rarity.

Posted on: 9/29 19:43
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#7
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tsherry
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Thanks, all. Very helpful.

I will be pulling the clip to address rust issues on the main body where the front fenders attach, and because I'm not as flexible as I was 40 years ago. The clip can be stashed outside under cover while the transplant is taking place; I'll then work on fender and shell damage (rust and collision) while it's apart.

The replacement engine came out of a running '47 Clipper; the seller was nice enough to provide me video of the compression test and the running engine on the road and in the driveway, before they pulled it to put in a fuel injected SBC. (sad for the Clipper, good for me, though).

I've got a cherry picker and a low-rise lift which makes chassis work a bit more convenient.

Posted on: 10/1 14:49
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Re: '40 110 Engine removal--with or without the trans?
#8
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tsherry
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[Q]All 1940 Packards have a junction block on the left inner fender panel about 6" back from the radiator......[/Q]

My '37 115C had a bastardized junction block there as well. The original having apparently disintegrated, one of the previous owners used a clear chunk of 3/4" diameter plastic tubing, and inserted 1/2" long, 8x32 machine screws into it, with 'U' shaped wire connectors on the wiring. They had about 10 of those screws on the tube; and three or four were used. I replaced that earlier this year with a modern junction block. Sorta makes me wonder what other nightmares are waiting for me.

Posted on: 10/1 15:02
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