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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#11
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Marvin
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Thank you for the advice. I have a 56’ service manual and about 5lbs of downloaded material printed and catalogued. I’ve been reading this material along with many threads on the forum. Thanks for the information on the flex hose. I removed the hose, plugged one end with my finger and was able to blow some even with it plugged, indicative of a hole or holes. Appears to have been taped in the middle at some point. Now I just have to locate a replacement.

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Posted on: 12/17 14:19
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#12
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PackardDon
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Dwight Heinmuller and most of the other dealers carry the hoses. Dwight's are not exact reproductions but they are well-made and work perfectly.

Posted on: 12/17 16:30
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#13
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humanpotatohybrid
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For the door "pop" the first thing I'd do is shoot some PB Blaster into the hinges and open/close the door a few times. Unless you can see it misaligned, it could just be some corrosion sticking it up.

Posted on: 12/17 20:41
Owner of '55 Clipper Deluxe. Engine is stuck-ish.
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#14
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Marvin
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I was going to hook up the fuel pump and fuel lines today (Christmas), the weather is great. However, the fitting that the parts guy swore would work was too small so, onto the dash. The vinyl is in great shape. Filthy and stiff, but the foam was trash; crumbly and sticky. I cleaned and vacuumed the “foam” away then used Nu-vinyl to soften the vinyl. While I was sitting in the Packard, I looked up and examined the clips and rods that once held the headliner, wondering; A: how the heck does this comes out, and B: how does it go back? My service manual doesn’t really discuss this and I really do not want to break anything. Plus, what is the best to clean/polish chrome inside the car?

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Posted on: 12/25 14:58
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#15
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Leeedy
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Quote:

Marvin wrote:
I was going to hook up the fuel pump and fuel lines today (Christmas), the weather is great. However, the fitting that the parts guy swore would work was too small so, onto the dash. The vinyl is in great shape. Filthy and stiff, but the foam was trash; crumbly and sticky. I cleaned and vacuumed the “foam” away then used Nu-vinyl to soften the vinyl. While I was sitting in the Packard, I looked up and examined the clips and rods that once held the headliner, wondering; A: how the heck does this comes out, and B: how does it go back? My service manual doesn’t really discuss this and I really do not want to break anything. Plus, what is the best to clean/polish chrome inside the car?



Always remember... the workshop manual and other factory literature was intended for new Packards. Since that time has long since passed, we need to turn to methods from today for yesterday's items.

When in comes to the instrument panel (dash) pad. Yes, it is very typical for the foam to have degraded to what ranges from a sticky goo to something like Rice Crispies to something like crushed graham crackers... even powder. This all depends on where the car has lived and the amount of sunlight to which the pad was exposed.

Either way, substances such as "Nu-Vinyl" are not likely to do the kind of softening/shaping you will need.

I've done lots and lots and lots of these pads over the years. I always suggest that you get a professional automotive trim shop to do such work. However, if you feel very secure in DIY, here is what you do:

• Be sure to perform the following procedures in room temperatures or above ... whenever possible.
• Make certain to have a vacuum cleaner or Shop-Vac available.
• Make sure to have a professional auto trimmer's heat gun... or at the very least a good hand-held hair dryer.
• Cover the vehicle carpet and front seat with drop cloths to protect against degraded foam, dust and sticky goo that may be under the pad.
• Be prepared with proper foam in proper density to re-pack your pad.
• Be prepared with appropriate scissors, screw drivers and related auto trimmer's tools.

1.) Clean the vinyl pad exterior with a mild soap and water or a professional grade vinyl cleaner. Do NOT attempt to straighten wrinkles at this time.

2.) Remove all trim from the A-pillars and at the base of the windshield.

3.) Use the heat gun or hair dryer to warm the pad vinyl cover. Don't try to do straightening at this time. NOTE that SOME vinyl treatment MAY be flammable and might ignite when using a heat gun. Keep this in mind and proceed accordingly only if you are familiar with using a heat gun!

4.) Carefully peel the vinyl cover back starting at the base of the windshield. Note that if the cover is stiff or has become brittle, it MAY crack in places unless well warmed. You may need to heat and re-heat in sections as needed. Then coax rearward. SOME pad covers may be degraded to the point of being extremely brittle, but often even these can be treated and warmed to become somewhat flexible.

5.) Once cover has been pulled back far enough, assess the level of degraded foam underneath and then proceed accordingly. If very dry and granulated, you can simply begin vacuuming. IF gooey use a putty knife or scraper to scoop out debris. The instrument panel top and inner pad cover need not be spotless, since new foam will absorb any minor irregularities. But clean out as best you can.

6.) Cut and fit new foam to instrument panel top. Remember that the pad cover has likely shrunk since new. So keep this in mind.

7.) Roll the new foam edge into the pocket created at the lip of the instrument panel.

8.) Carefully begin to return the pad cover to proper position, heating as you go. Once you have the cover back near the base of the windshield, use a few trim screws to hold in place. This may require heating and stretching back to position. The pad cover will often happily return to the old shape once it had proper amount and type of foam under it.

9. Continue heating and positioning the pad cover until satisfactory.

10.) Reinstall metal trim on windshield base and A-pillars.

Posted on: 12/25 20:10
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#16
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Marvin
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In researching clogged fuel line, I came across the project blog section. I do not wish to post incorrectly and since this posting will be ongoing, is there a way to transfer this thread to the project blog?
plus, I am truly having a delightful time with the fuel system. Today I connected an electric fuel pump to the fuel line in front of the engine and discovered there wasn't any no fuel being expelled. My belief, is that I will have to drop the tank and starting with the pickup screen work my way back to the front, possibly replacing everything as I go.

Posted on: 12/28 15:59
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#17
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Ozstatman
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Quote:
Marvin wrote: In researching clogged fuel line, I came across the project blog section. I do not wish to post incorrectly and since this posting will be ongoing, is there a way to transfer this thread to the project blog?....
Marvin,

I've sent BigKev, our Webmaster, a note asking if he can move this thread over to the Project Blog section.

Posted on: 12/28 21:56
Mal
/o[]o\
====

Bowral, Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia
"Out of chaos comes order" - Nietzsche.

1938 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

1941 One-Twenty Club Coupe - SOLD

1948 Super Eight Limo, chassis RHD - SOLD

1950 Eight Touring Sedan - SOLD

What's this?
Put your Packard in the Packard Vehicle Registry!
Here's how!
Any questions - PM or email me at ozstatman@gmail.com
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#18
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Leeedy
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Quote:

Marvin wrote:
In researching clogged fuel line, I came across the project blog section. I do not wish to post incorrectly and since this posting will be ongoing, is there a way to transfer this thread to the project blog?
plus, I am truly having a delightful time with the fuel system. Today I connected an electric fuel pump to the fuel line in front of the engine and discovered there wasn't any no fuel being expelled. My belief, is that I will have to drop the tank and starting with the pickup screen work my way back to the front, possibly replacing everything as I go.


As I pointed out in the two major reasons why fuel isn't pumping in cars that have been sitting. You dealt with reason #1 and I was right on that one. Reason #2 (as I listed) is that the intake tube IN the tank (the thing I call the "index finger") is usually clogged with rust. You MAY get lucky and be able to unplug the rust in this tube. But be forewarned... this is not easy at all to do.

And as I said, all the new fuel pumps (including electric ones) in the world will never repair or bypass this problem. It just won't work. And I don't know of a "screen" in the tank... just the bent index finger intake tube that likes to clog up (usually beginning at the bend of the tube).

And again as I said... boiling out the tank and the usual fixes/cleanings do nothing to cure this line if it is blocked with rust. And the intake tubes often are.

Cleaning the intake tube is possible, but usually nowhere easy. Since the tube was usually welded into the tank, it really is a big deal to try and clean it or service it. My cure was simply to find a good tank with a clear and clean intake tube... and replace the clogged tank.

Posted on: 12/29 13:58
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#19
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Marvin
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I have so many things to repair I’ve decided to stop chasing my tail on the fuel issue and heed Leeedy’s advice and purchase a new tank. A quick search on Kanter’s website lists the tank as currently unavailable. So, on Monday I will be giving them a call. I’ve seen Packard’s rear tires on ramps in photos. Other than deactivating the T/L system is there anything else I should note. Also planning on replacing the rear shock adsorbers while I am at it. In reading threads in the forum, I’ve taken note on Kayaba shock absorbers # KYB-343149. Does anyone have a better choice or opinion? I wish to not impede the T/L system.

Posted on: 12/31 14:35
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Re: Trying to fix my 56
#20
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BH
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Posted on: 12/31 22:48
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