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Re: Push button then & now
#11
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HH56
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I don't remember when the Chrysler brands came out with their pushbuttons -- maybe 55 -- but it was all mechanical cable operation as was the Mercury setup which I think was first used in 57. I think AMC had buttons too for a year or two but believe it was the Chrysler system. Think the Packard and Edsel Autolite systems were the only ones with electric motors until RR came out with theirs.

Posted on: 9/21 10:12
Howard
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Re: Push button then & now
#12
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PackardDon
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I believe that Chrysler’s first was 1957 with the new finned styling. Not sure, though, as I’ve owned only ‘64 and ‘65 Imperials. ‘64 had it and ‘65 might as well have had it as it used the same cable mechanism but controlled by a lever. The push-buttons always worked well on my cars but the lever was a pain as it always came out of adjustment, being a little device held to the lower column’s outer sheath by small screws.

Posted on: 9/21 12:08
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Re: Push button then & now
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Owen_Dyneto
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Chrysler introduced push button transmission controls in 1956.

Posted on: 9/21 12:11
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Re: Push button then & now
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PackardDon
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Some sources say it was introduced on the two-speed Powerflyte transmission in 1954 while other indicated it first appeared in 1956. There was apparently a version of electric shift as far back as 1914 as the Vulcan Electric Shift!

Posted on: 9/21 13:32
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Re: Push button then & now
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Fish'n Jim
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Glad we got that straight.
I wasn't around in '14, so trumped.
Chrysler '54 powerflyte 2 speed - first mechanical. '56 torqueflyte 3 speed - what I remember.
According to reports, Packard had the electric in '56 and appears was fraught with gremlins and pulled. That was also the infamous Studebaker merger times, so who knows what the reasons might have been, if P wasn't in control anymore and on "death row".
Anytime one is looking for an excuse for their casue, it's easy to find one.
A patent search would show more but I can't get done what I have now.
Does it really matter?

Posted on: 9/22 9:58
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Re: Push button then & now
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HH56
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Quote:
According to reports, Packard had the electric in '56 and appears was fraught with gremlins and pulled.

PB system was not pulled and was available on all 56 production. It was even planned for the 57s but with some improvements.

Several Packard historians have stated in books and articles that even though it was a first generation device with bugs it was largely successful. Again, it would be nice to know whose engineers did what because other articles mention Packard was disappointed in the implementation and felt that the Autolite work was somewhat lacking in design and build quality -- possibly due to the short lead time and lack of testing before being rushed into production -- but still disappointed.

Still other writers have speculated that overall quality was lacking because Autolite was also paying heed to rumors in the auto industry that Packard was all but finished and it was a short term deal because they would not be getting more business. Probably some truth to that as Autolite was reported to have destroyed some critical tooling shortly after Packard closed. Stude could not even order a stock of service parts because the tooling was gone.

The basic design of the unit lived on with many of the initial issues resolved or improved upon in the followup version used in the Edsel.

Posted on: 9/22 11:19
Howard
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