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Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#1
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PennyPackard
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Hi all, two quick questions as I’m starting to condition my *new 288 (49 or 50). I put some MMO in the spark holes to soak it while trying to gently turn the motor over by hand while it’s out of the car. As much fun as it was redoing the head gasket on my current crack ridden motor last summer, this motor was supposedly professionally rebuilt before indoor climate controlled storage so I’d prefer not to fully tear it apart.

Question 1: some of the fluid runs out from the valves unsurprisingly, is there some way to assure those cylinders get the fluid into the piston or do I just keep pouring it in/wiping it off and plugging the ports with rags?

Question 2: I’ve tried turning the motor via the front crank bolt (no plugs in), hoping the rotation would happen as easy as Ross’ retiming video, but it just seems to loosen and tighten that bolt. I tightened it down with the bar some but still the motor didn’t spin. I’m worried about over torquing and damaging something, is that a rational fear here or can I just pull it counter clockwise hard until it stops tightening as long as I keep soaking/working not to hurt valves and pistons?

Thank you all!

Posted on: 5/27 11:43
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#2
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humanpotatohybrid
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Fortunately two easy answers:

- if it’s coming out of the valves then the valves are just open. No concern.

- look up the torque spec on that bolt. Set a torque wrench then you won’t have to worry about over torquing. It won’t hurt to loosen and tighten it alternatively.

Was this engine stored with spark plugs in? If so, I REALLY doubt that it was in good shape to begin with. Or maybe they stored it outside in the rain? It should take many years before the pistons or valves freeze from rust in a good engine.

Look up how to remove the tappets. If it’s not freeing up after a day or few, probably you have a stuck valve. If you remove the tappets or otherwise disconnect the valve train from the crank, you can tell what’s up. Though unless you have multiple stuck valves, it should free up to some extent.

Also I assume you at least have the plugs out when trying to crank it? Otherwise it’s hydrolocked lol

Posted on: 5/27 11:48
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#3
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53 Cavalier
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How long was this engine stored after being rebuilt?

Posted on: 5/27 12:01
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#4
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PennyPackard
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It sat for years and years, but looking in the crankcase and valves looks like there’s build grease on things. Not an outside or wet engine that’s for sure but it also wasn’t hermetically sealed. I trust the build and overall storage, but the time is my main concerning variable.

Seems like the vibration damper screw torque spec is 130-150, so sounds like setting the torque wrench to that and giving it a post soak wiggle is in order. I think my initial effort was under that since I just poured the MMO in a minute before and I was trying to be cautious.

Posted on: 5/27 14:59
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#5
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53 Cavalier
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Maybe it's just dried up grease from when it was assembled, a little resistance here there and everywhere and now it's too stiff to turn. "Probably" once it moves it will be good.

But the safe bet would be to do a little checking, at least pull the head and pan, and then go further if you think you need to. If there is a bit of rust on the cylinders, stuck valves, etc. it would all be easily remedied with some time and the cost of a gasket set. If it was just an old engine not such a big deal, but you've got a "new" engine there.

Of course this is easy for me to say, I'm not the one that would have to do the work! LOL

Posted on: 5/27 15:18
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#6
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PennyPackard
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Hah! If you’re interested I’d pay for that work in beer and bad jokes! I am seriously considering finding a place that will just get it done but that’s getting pretty hard to come by unless you want to pay 100k for a full concourse restoration and be on a waitlist for however long for the privilege!! If I had the space, money, time, and skill I suppose I’d just live alone with my perfect Packards no one ever sees though.

Posted on: 5/27 18:07
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#7
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BDC
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Beer & bad jokes used to get me in a lot of trouble 😁.
I feel your pain about finding someone who can do stuff for a reasonable price.

Posted on: 5/28 11:10
I can explain it to you but I can't understand it for you

Bad company corrupts good character!

Farming: the art of losing money while working 100 hours a week to feed people who think you are trying to kill them
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Re: Soaking and Crank bolt question 288
#8
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53 Cavalier
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Quote:

PennyPackard wrote:
Hah! If you’re interested I’d pay for that work in beer and bad jokes! I am seriously considering finding a place that will just get it done but that’s getting pretty hard to come by unless you want to pay 100k for a full concourse restoration and be on a waitlist for however long for the privilege!! If I had the space, money, time, and skill I suppose I’d just live alone with my perfect Packards no one ever sees though.


There are fewer and fewer shops around that have the expertise to work on classic and vintage cars. Mechanics that plug in a vehicle to a computer, and then replace whatever parts it tells them to are of no help to us. I have found that I'm better off to just develop the skill I need and work on my car myself. So far it's worked out okay, but I haven't tackled any serious body work yet. Unfortunately space, money, time and skill are in short supply around my place as well.

Posted on: 5/28 20:27
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