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1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#1
Not too shy to talk
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Retired
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Good morning,
About to replace the housing and was wondering how many foot-pounds of torque to tighten the bolts and what type of sealant to use.
Thanks
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Posted on: 6/21 8:24
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#2
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53 Cavalier
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I used Permatex No.2 on mine last year, no leaks. Be sure to seal the bolt threads as those are open to the water jacket.

These are from the service manual for my 53, but I suspect your torque values would be the same. You can check the service manual for your car to know for sure.

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Posted on: 6/21 9:05
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#3
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TxGoat
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I'd keep torque down to 15 to 20 ftlb with the cast iron water outlet. The later ones were steel and would not crack. The cast iron ones can crack, especially if they are rusted or have been overtightend in the past. With clean surfaces and a good gasket and sealer, you should be OK at the lower torque. I would avoid using a thick gasket on the cast iron outlet. A thicker gasket or double gasket can be used on the steel outlets.

Posted on: 6/21 10:26
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#4
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BigKev
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***TOPIC MOVED TO PRE-WAR FORUM***

Posted on: 6/21 15:39
-BigKev


1954 Packard Clipper Deluxe Touring Sedan -> Registry | Project Blog

1937 Packard 115-C Convertible Coupe -> Registry | Project Blog
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#5
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Packard Don
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My 1954 Patrician with aluminum head had some previously repaired corrosion and some damage to the steel outlet that made getting it to seal somewhat difficult no matter what type or how much sealant was used. Ultimately I used a cork gasket which solved the problem and needed only a thin layer is silicone gasket sealer. I’ve never used a torque wrench on these, instead relying on feel to get it tight.

Posted on: 6/21 16:47
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#6
Not too shy to talk
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Retired
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I’m still somewhat confused about the procedure of installing the new thermostat.
Does the thermostat go spring side down directly onto the cylinder head first, then the gasket and then the housing?
Should I put sealant on both sides of the gasket and anywhere else? It’s been many years since I’ve changed a thermostat.
Also the gasket I was given seems paper thin so I bought a bit thicker one.
It’s got a peel off plastic side with a tacky coating.
Thanks

Posted on: 6/21 22:51
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#7
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Ross
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The thermostat is inserted into the housing spring side down. There should be a metal sleeve to hold the 'stat up in the housing against the internal shoulder. If that was missing from whatever was on the car before, you will need to buy of make one.

Posted on: 6/22 6:27
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#8
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Ken_P
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I've had the best luck on my thermostat housing using the following procedure:

1. Cork gasket (either get from one of the vendors or cut your own, cork gasket material is available at most autoparts stores by the roll).
2. Attach gasket to thermostat housing using a thin coat of permatex no. 2/indian head shellac/RTV - your choice, I prefer the indian head shellace.
3. Put a thin layer of grease on the gasket on the side the faces the head - this allows you to remove and re-install without having to replace the gasket every time. I use the same procedure on my oil pan, and I've had that off a few times with no damage to the gasket.

Good luck!

Posted on: 6/22 9:33
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1937 115 1082 - Total basket case, partial restoration, sold Hershey 2015 Project blog / Registry
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#9
Not too shy to talk
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Retired
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Thanks for the info and illustrations.
Much appreciated.

Posted on: 6/27 20:22
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Re: 1937 237 6 cylinder thermostat housing
#10
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I did get it all back together, new 160* thermostat and upper hose and it stays at around 180* until I get in stop and go traffic then it’ll hover around 200* and slightly higher. It has to keep moving for the temp to come back down. The ambient air temperature was in the mid 80’s and humid which probably added to the high temperature reading. Taking everything into consideration seems like it’s just gonna run a bit hot at times.
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Posted on: 7/5 20:19
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