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Re: Cross reference Fram C-4 Oil Filter
Home away from home
Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
In Australia the P stands for paper (paper element). I assume the same applies to US filters as well. Cheers, John

Posted on: 7/8 1:36:52
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Re: Flexing wheels on 54 Cavalier
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
I had this problem on my 56 Patrician and was given a possible solution by a friend. Simply squirt a small dollop of silicon sealer at four points around the wheel rim, replace the hubcap and wipe off any seepage. Has worked well for me and the only issue is removal and replacement whenever the hubcap has to be removed and replaced. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2018/11/18 0:37
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Re: Any '56 400's out there painted solid Scottish Heather (K)?
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
My '56 Patrician is also a single tone Maltese Grey model and came from the factory that way. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/12/14 1:01
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Re: Vacuum Tank
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
I've had a look at the substance poured out of the vac tank but I can't determine for certain what it is. Unfortunately I'd put it in the motor oil drain pan and it had mixed somewhat with a little residual sump oil. I can say it is of a light consistency and brown in colour, which does suggest to me it could well have started out life as brake fluid. Apart from mixing with a very small amount of sump oil, it is possible that it also has mixed with surface rust inside the vac tank, assuming that rust does actually exist in there.

Based on Fred's guesswork, I'm now thinking that it probably is old brake fluid which has found its way into the tank when the old BTV gave up the ghost, and has lived comfortably in there for the last 6.5 years. It's been cleaned out now and the tank resoldered and refitted. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/9/21 4:16
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Re: Vacuum Tank
Home away from home
Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
It's certainly possible, but it would have had to have been in there a fair while. I installed a reco'd BTV about 6.5 years ago because the one in the car lost all boost (hard pedal). I arranged for the reco BTV to be sent to me by the previous owner of the car and still have the failed one. I've not lost any brake fluid since installing the replacement and checked the reservoir two days ago and there was still plenty in there. I still have some of the old oil/fluid so I'll have another look at it tomorrow. I gather from your question Fred that it's possible for brake fluid to find its way into the vac tank. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/9/20 1:54
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Vacuum Tank
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
G'day Men, I've come across an issue that has me stumped and thought someone might have an answer for me. Yesterday while fitting new vac hoses, the hose pipe on the vac tank came loose. After removing the tank, and a right pain in the rear end that job is, I started cleaning everything prior to resoldering and was surprised to find a large quantity of oil in the tank, maybe up to an inch or so on the bottom. Now my question is, where in the bloody hell would that oil come from? Is that something purposely put in the tank for some specific reason that I can't think of? Regards, John

Posted on: 2016/9/19 3:15
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Re: New Gas Tank Issue
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
I decided to check my '56 Patrician and I can confirm that there's no notch in the filler neck. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/8/29 1:26
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Re: V8 spark plug fitment?
Home away from home
Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
G'day Boys, I haven't contributed much lately but thought I should throw some small change into this topic. I can't tell you what numbers are on the heads of my '56 Patrician (body & engine # 5682 3692) until I can get back out in the shed (just had knee surgery this afternoon). What I can tell is that for quite a few years now I have been running NGK BPR5EY plugs in my car and have had no trouble whatsoever - just clean and regap every so often and all is good. By the way, if I remember correctly the "Y" in the number relates to a notched centre electrode which is supposed to divide the spark and give a better burn. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/8/15 0:44
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Re: Alternator & Ammeter
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Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
G'day Men (don't know if I should be using that term these days),

Today I had the setup inspected by an auto elec and he said the way it was wired is fine and the alternator is charging correctly. When asked about the ammeter he essentially said the same as Howard - if I didn't mind the needle deflection then it was quite safe to leave as is. He thought I possibly could have gotten away with connecting the alternator to the red wire out of the old regulator, but agreed the guage size of the old wires could be a problem under full electrical load. It would be better however, to leave this wire connected to the regulator as it's now receiving current flowing in the opposite direction, so is "hot". The regulator still remains inactive.

Regarding this wire, he thought that the ammeter must have some sort of shunt behind it, but I told him that if it does have one it must be internal as I could see nothing attached behind the ammeter, other than two red wires which look of similar guage to the red regulator wire. So, I have now decided to leave it all as is and keep an eye on the charge rate via the plug-in voltmeter.

One other thing we spoke about was headlights. I had previously installed halogens and was concerned about the heat which probably would be generated when switched on, especially high beam. I explained that I had checked the wiring behind one of the headlights a couple of days ago and the cloth covering on the wires was disintegrating. We agreed that the headlights should be rewired, through a relay, and he'll be doing that in about a week's time. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/6/24 20:50
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Re: Alternator & Ammeter
Home away from home
Joined:
2007/6/5 21:32
From Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 230
G'day Peter, to answer your question the only reason I went the way I did is because I didn't want to risk the consequences of the increased amperage overheating the wiring under the dash. If the meter could be made to work properly without this potential risk then good, which is what I was thinking when I said I might talk to an auto elec. Otherwise, I'm now just as comfortable leaving it as is and utilising a voltmeter to keep an eye on things. I'll report back on any developments if and when they happen. My thanks for all the helpful comments as electrical stuff is most definitely not my bag. Cheers, John

Posted on: 2016/6/10 3:24
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