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Board index » All Posts (DavidPackard)




Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
My question will be based on the assumption that the driver's door latch 'master pawl' has failed in a mode similar to that documented by BDeB (crack and ultimate separation of the coordination tab).

If I'm unable to find a driver's door latch would any of the other door latches contain a 'master pawl' that is identical to the one in the driver's door?

I've looked at both of the right hand side (passenger's side) door latches as they protrude from the door. I would say that both right hand side latches rotate in the same direction, and both have the dovetail above the gear, therefore I've assumed the similarity of the pawl is associated with the side of the car LF/LR and RF/RR. This would likely be different if the vehicle has 'suicide' rear doors. The Chrysler latch repair kits on 'Ebay' frequently will equate LF/RR and RF/LR, I believe those applications did have 'suicide' rear doors, until '49.

I would like to purchase a left front door latch complete' ready to go', but if I can't, can I harvest parts from another door's latch? I would like to avoid making a 'master pawl' from scratch.

Dp

PS. At the Saturday night 'car show'/retiree's club meeting another voice has been heard from on how to remove the failed latch. That scheme is to abrasively defeat the heads of both the 'gear' and 'pawl' shafts, remove the cover, and extract the gear until the door is free.

Posted on: 2017/5/14 22:22
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
BDeB, Dell, & HH56 Thanks for the feedback.

Multiple bolts per hinge leaf make a bit more sense than one.

My question about the striker captive nut plate was to clarify that if plan A (moving the entire door forward) didn't work then defeating the striker screws could be done in two ways; first drilling from the rear door opening (difficult and only if the last resort), or providing an access opening in the 'B' pillar. At least the access panel opening modification would be hidden, but from the factory there is no access opening.

I noted the small strap at the bottom hinge in Howard's photos of the '47 door. Clearly that feature seems to be an assembly aid that has nothing to do with structure or strength of the hinge. Just there to position the door while an upper bolt is started. I guess that assumes the hinges are pre-installed on the body and the doors are brought to the car without hinges. If the '48 detail is about the same . . . an assembly aid only . . . then perhaps that item could be convinced to cooperate and the door can be deflected outward and perhaps forward a bit more.

Dell, thanks for the clarification on the photo. From the evidence ( both the inner and outer handle have lots of lost motion ) we are currently leaning toward the 'pawl' failure that BDed documented in post #13. That is the inner and outer handle input to the master pawl is OK, but the coordination between the master and slave pawls has been defeated by failure of the master pawl. Once (perhaps if) I ever get this mess apart I'll know a lot more.

Right now I'm thinking of collecting repair parts and then taking the passenger's side apart (that door opens just fine) and going to school on what to expect and prepare for when the driver's side is addressed. If I have the current right side lock 'in-hand' I can also match it up to the NOS one I bought on E-bay. I know that one is wrong because it has a 'bent' locking rod, but I don't know if there was any other differences between the models. If all it takes is to swap the rods my plan will be to have a zero time unit on at least one door.

The Ebay unit is NOS and I can read all of the patent numbers. I looked a few up on the web and learned that the Bassick Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut held the patents, and supposedly manufactured the latch. The irony is that I was born and lived in the greater Bridgeport area for 50+ years. Had I known I could have stocked-up on parts.

dp

Posted on: 2017/5/13 14:22
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/5/13 11:35
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
Steve . . . right now the door is a bit on the loose side, that is not tight against the 'rubber'. When I tug it moves a little. The failure may have set a 'new' location for the 'gear' to reside . . . something that you would normally adjust with the striker.

dp

Posted on: 2017/5/12 12:08
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard
Last resort indeed.

Nothing will happen until I have a serviceable latch in-hand.

I'm currently making a drilling template patterned from the passenger's side. If plan B or C is the only option I would make a magnetically attached drilling guide along with extra long bushings to improve my aim . . . I will also need to buy 'extra long' drill bits since the depth of the 'B' pillar in that location is at least 3 + inches.

To allow the latch to fall into the door I will need to remove the door panel to get to the fifth screw, so the interior will need to come out no matter what. Is long as the seat and door panel is off option A will still be the prime way to go. Perhaps a hole in the cover and a special tool to move the 'pawls'.

I looked at the front door hinges. The heads are covered when the door is closed . . . are you suggesting drilling the door hinge screws from the fender side?

dp

Posted on: 2017/5/12 12:04
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Re: 1948 door latch
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DavidPackard

Posted on: 2017/5/12 10:48
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Re: P.M. alternator
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DavidPackard
Howard

I called CAS today. They disavowed any knowledge about the AC system in my (Bill Lauer's) '54. Their comment was they do not install or work on AC systems, so although I'm never wrong this time I was a little short of being right. I found the stack of receipts that came with the car when I bought it, and there was a single page, not quite a receipt, but a single page with no letterhead, that detailed some of the parts and cost associated with the AC installation. On that page was mention of an automotive refrigeration business in Orange, CA. I'll call them tomorrow and post the details of that conversation. Perhaps that company configured units to the desired voltage and polarity . . . one can only hope.

I have some amount of experience with PMs, they been used on motorcycles for years. I see only two wires in the photos you posted. My bet is that is the AC output of the alternator, with all of the rectification and voltage limiting provided by the 'regulator'. That's the good news is, you can configure whatever you want. The PMs in a Harley produce at least about 12 volts per 1000 rpm . . . that's the AC voltage. So at full song the AC voltage is north of 70 volts. The regulator is heavily finned and faces the wind. I suspect if I cut one apart I would see a rather large Zener along with a diode based bridge.

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/26 19:19
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Re: P.M. alternator
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DavidPackard
Hi Howard

I'll get back with you on whether the blower is running at 'normal' speed. With a sample size of one that will be quite subjective.

I don't know any of the details of my AC installation. Clearly southern California is filled with folks that could rewind an existing blower motor to 6 volts. I'm led to believe the polarity change will result in a motor that rotates in the opposite direction. The fan will lose some flow at constant speed that could be recovered with a slight bump in motor speed . . . assuming you can tolerate the current increase. All of that activity could have been done 'in-house' at CAS.

Every so often the subject of the compressor clutch will come-up at the Saturday evening car show. We are equally at a loss as to whether this is truly a 6 volt item or a 12 volt unit operating at essentially below the recommended minimum voltage. If I can find some coil resistance data I can measure mine and put this to rest. Clearly the AC would be activated after the engine is running and if the voltage regulator was less than full normal operating temperature the voltage would be biased high. My car, once started, will have a system voltage of 7.5-7.6 volts until the regulator warms . . . then it's in the 7.1-7.2 volt range.

There is also the issue of 'pull-in' versus 'hold' voltage. A half volt between the two would make a world of difference.

My unit is mounted hanging off the lip at the bottom of the dash. The 'far end' of the evaporator is essentially resting on the transmission hump. I have not disassembled to view the configuration of the motor, but I would expect a double shaft design . . . AC designs like to have lots of exit velocity and noise as surrogates for performance.

I've got a pretty good sized rheostat, perhaps I could map the clutch performance envelope of pull-in and release voltage levels. It's hard to measure the release voltage with only the unit's ON/OFF switch.

I have been toying with the idea of having an 'on-board' converter on my '54 with some type of current limiter so I can re-charge the 'constant loss' 12 volt system if the voltage gets on the low side. The two six volt Optima batteries combine to a lot of hours of running the radio. Right now I trickle charge once every three weeks.

Have you made a decision on whether your system will have a common ground?

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/25 22:26
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Re: P.M. alternator
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DavidPackard
Several year ago I bought Bill Lauer's '54 Cavalier. This car is equipped with an after-market under dash AC unit. I believe the modification was done by Custom Auto Service in Santa Ana. I don't have any details on the means they pulled this off but the car is still 6 volt positive ground and the AC works just fine. I believe the blower motor and compressor clutch were switched-out for 6 volt items . . . but I'm not that sure about the clutch winding. I agree about the comment about electrical current requirements . . . except if the car is used primarily during the day the AC electrical demand should be less than headlights, so the original generator should be able to keep the battery at full charge, but perhaps only during daylight hours.

I've read quite a bit of technical information about running two different voltages of opposite polarity. I'll admit I don't really understand all of the concerns, but the compressor clutch is likely equipped with a single wire, with the ground provided by compressor case. That detail would immediately put you in the common ground arena (still not sure if that is a show stopper). If any of the after-market compressors feature a two wire connection, that is, the clutch coil is isolated from the case that's the one I would buy. At least you'll have the option to have independent grounds, assuming the interior portion can be isolated.

I've installed a 12 volt, negative ground sub-system in my '54. It is a 'constant loss' system that powers a 'Secrete Audio' radio, and various combinations of USB chargers, and GPS units . . . all low current draw. This system does not share the ground. The 12 volt system is completely isolated, and all components require two wire connections. There is no 'on-board' 6P to 12N converter. My 12 volt battery is actually two 6 volt Optima units, so if the car's primary battery lets me down I can steal from Peter to pay Paul.

My '48 has a voltage/polarity converter and is wired with a common ground. That converter is a 7A unit from www.cruisingelectronics.co.nz . . . yes that's a New Zealand company. Again that system powers a 'Secrete Audio' radio, and various combinations of USB chargers, and GPS units . . . all low current draw. That car is equipped with a 6 volt positive ground PowerGen alternator ( CS130 based stuffed into a case that looks like an 'old school' generator), so running out of capacity is not likely an issue. I tapped into the rear seat cigarette lighter circuit to power the converter. There is no 12 volt battery in that car.

If the goal is to put an AC into a 6 volt positive ground car I would contact Custom Auto Service and reference Bill's '54 Cavalier. If you run out of generator capacity because the AC must be operated in conjunction with the headlights then that's a different problem statement and that solution has a cost of no more than $500 for the PowerGen, or no more than $150 for a 6+ 10SI ( my costs have a 'set-aside' for un-expected items such as brackets and wiring modifications that always seem to crop-up). You will only be left with the belt width issue to deal with.

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/25 21:03
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Re: '48 288 Valve Lash
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DavidPackard
Thanks for the information Ross.

If I might be allowed a 'follow-up' question; after setting the cold values, did the lifters need any significant adjustment when the engine was warm, and do you adjust to the original values (8 & 10) or SC 22-12 values ( 6 & 8)?

dp

Posted on: 2017/4/25 10:01
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