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Board index » All Posts (Wat_Tyler)




Re: Tire pressures
#31
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Wat_Tyler
The rear tire is higher pressure - 40PSI. Front is 36. I've started out on a hot summer day to go a few hundred miles and seen it peg the sensor, which tops out at 50PSI.


But don't discount an over-sensitive sensor. Still, it makes me wonder.

Posted on: 12/25 20:41
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Tire pressures
#32
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Wat_Tyler
Quote:

jw4 wrote:
Quote:

Wat_Tyler wrote:
I'd have to look again to be certain, but I'm awfully darned sure that the rating on the tire says "cold" beside the number.


That is exactly correct. Also, the temperature does not rise the pressure inside the tire, as much as one would expect.

The most common standard (for radials on passenger cars?) seems to be 30-35psi.



Yes, and no. In my truck, thanks to its dash gauge, the tire pressure varies no more than 3-4 pounds on a day's journey. On my big motorcycle, however, on a hot summer day, it can climb 10 pounds.

Posted on: 12/25 18:09
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Tire pressures
#33
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Wat_Tyler
I'd have to look again to be certain, but I'm awfully darned sure that the rating on the tire says "cold" beside the number.


I'm still trying to figure out why Harley-Davidson sells its bikes with bias ply tires still. It's definitely a different breed from a car tire.

Posted on: 12/25 7:00
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Tire pressures
#34
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Wat_Tyler
When I first started running radials, I'd notice that I'd have plenty of center tread left when the sides wear wearing out. When I started driving pick-ups as a matter of course, I also started running the max pressure in the tires. If it said 44PSI on the sidewall, that's what I ran. I noticed also that my tread seemed to wear more evenly that way.


Go out, try something, make notes of how it works, and have your own experience.

Posted on: 12/24 15:50
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: 1941 Packard 160
#35
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Wat_Tyler
There's the old degree wheel method. I read about that once - somewhere.

Posted on: 12/23 14:48
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Stay warm out there....
#36
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Wat_Tyler
We were -4 this morning and now are up to 3.


It's not the cold, it's the wind. This is the reverse of "it's not the heat, it's the humidity."


Humans are difficult to keep happy.

Posted on: 12/23 14:46
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Wat
#37
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Wat_Tyler
Took the '46 out for a country drive today. First time it's gone very far in months. It started fairly easily and ran decently after it warmed a bit, and it drove about like it always has for me.


Speaking of heating, I think that the high reading on the (aftermarket) temp gauge is erroneous. I took along my trusty laser temp gizmo and shot the engine after it had been running for about half an hour, including 10-11 miles of driving. At the thermostat housing, it read about 175* and the head read 190* or so. The gauge was reading about 220*. I think that it used to read 195* under similar circumstances. Regardless, it still needs a cooler t-stat. The heat works nicely, though.


I got 12 salvage wall cabinets and 20 salvage lights for the garage. I worked on wall cabinets this weekend, until my back started to complain. They'll be great for smaller bit-n-pieces. THe lights will get the building like an operating room. My eyes will be so happy.

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Posted on: 12/18 15:20
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: What about the 25K 105mph V8 Patrician?
#38
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Wat_Tyler
Granddad says he got his 2262 up to 107MPH on I-64 in eastern Virginia back in 1971 or so. Not sure how long he kept it there, but it overheated and messed up the engine. He attempted to flat tow it home (with his ex-wife's Chebby) and ran into the ditch with it and trashed the passenger side. We got it running summer of '73 and it smoked like a chimney. He was always disgusted with himself over that entire episode.


I conclude that the ol' 288 wouldn't have done 104MPH (SUSTAINED or otherwise) for 25K miles without making a mess of itself.

Posted on: 12/18 15:07
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: 1937 Super 8
#39
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Wat_Tyler
I think that if I were doing a post-war engine that I'd opt for a 327. Nearly as ubiquitous as the 288 and a bit more @$.

Posted on: 12/15 20:29
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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Re: Wat
#40
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Wat_Tyler
Happy Sunday!!! Yesterday was productive out in the hayhouse/shop/garage thingie. Installed another 20A circuit for power tools and such. It works. Wat hates wiring, basically, but somehow it gets done, and it works.


I had salvaged a heavy-duty closet rod and decided to utilize the corner. I took a piece of 2x4 and drilled a 1.5" hole in it. I then sawed it in two through the hole, giving me two pieces, each with a crescent cut-out in each end. I then screwed them to two support brackets and set the rod on it. It's good for annoying thngs to keep track of, like trim rings and extension cords. Just lift one end, slide on whatever you're storing, and then drop it back into the crescent. Gravity keeps it there.


As shown:

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Posted on: 12/11 10:43
If you're not having fun, maybe it's your own damned fault.
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