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Board index » All Posts (su8overdrive)




Re: Help with Heat Riser spring direction
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su8overdrive
Cardinal Santana, if it's not too late to add this, as i just noticed your heat riser spring discussion this afternoon, i fiddled with the adjustment on my NOS manifold heat control valve thermostatic spring on my '47 Super, but it works as the gentlemen above describe. If all else fails, a longtime Packardite told me you can take your original to a decent, long-established parts house and find a choke thermostatic spring that's close. You're making me feel guilty because i bought the last one Max Merritt had in the '90s, tho' he's likely unearthed more since.

You didn't ask, but assuming your thin tin manifold heat control thermostatic spring cover is rusty toast after all those years in the tundra, i conned John Kepich into reproducing it in stainless steel, so contact him.

Finally, as i exhausted my play value with that project and didn't want to revisit it for a few centuries, i lubed the shaft with a mixture of kerosene and powdered graphite, but i bow as always to any superior intel from the worthies on this forum.

Prosit.

Posted on: 2012/3/10 20:17
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Re: When/where did worm-type hose clamps first appear?
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su8overdrive
Thanks, Dr. Cole. Now i feel better about having the superior worm type on my '47 Super. Meanwhile, if anyone can unearth the first year/application of the modern worm style hose clamps, the Packard Trivial Pursuit in some of us'd love to know. Any WWII vets, grease money teenagers before the war or during the '40s recollect?

Posted on: 2012/3/10 19:58
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Re: Why did Packard never offer a marine version of the 120 engine?
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su8overdrive
Thanks, but most of us here gathered know the debut 120 was the same bore/stroke as Oldsmobile's straight 8, the same state of the art as the concurrent Pontiac straight 8, only, somehow, v a s t l y better than either or anything else. I resurrected, owned, drove one many years, witness my exchange with the 3M engineer. But i was asking a general question, not offering a thesis, so typed "282" simply as it applied to all the rest of that engine's production.

Cardinal Dyneto, that's as good a conjecture as i can figure. Thanks. Perhaps that's all there is to it. With the new 282-based, even tougher 288 & 327 introduced for the bathtubs, Packard may've figured the 282 had had its day, on land and water.

I wonder if any 120 engines were converted privately, or by some small firm, a la Augie Duesenberg's purveying the 254-ci Hudson splash-oiled straight eight?

And i still wonder why Buick never offered either its small or large ohv straight 8 in marine guise.

Chrysler built, proportionally, few 323-ci straight eights in relation to their inline sixes. That, and perhaps Mopar didn't bother with the smaller pleasure boat market for the reason BH cites above. Packard's marine 356 powered big cabin cruisers, fishing trawlers.

What's that they used to say about Camelot? "....for one brief, shining moment..." That was Packard, but for nearly half a century. No offense, but my interest fizzles out w/ the bathtubs and beyond, tho' a Mayfair coupe with stick and od is one of the best '50s cars extant, for those of you who enjoy postwar automobiles. Personally, i view my '47 as just a warmed over '42, not that that's a bad thing at all.

Interesting that even as Packard lay dying, they brought over Mercedes-Benz, the North American distribution rights.
Ironically, people who have no trouble comprehending Mercedes C, E, S Class and BMW 3, 5, 7 Series, can't grasp six, eight, Super 8, but that's another thread.

Posted on: 2012/3/10 19:44
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Why did Packard never offer a marine version of the 120 engine?
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su8overdrive
Anyone know why Packard sold marine versions only of the 245-ci six and 356-ci Su8, but never the 282-ci One-Twenty engine? A 3M engineer in Texas i bought some parts from for my '40 120 in 1975 told me they were still using Packard 120 engines working 24/7 irrigation pumps down there, governors set at 1800 or 2000 rpm.

BTW, in 1940, Augie Duesenberg was offering a marine version of the 254-ci Hudson splash-oiled straight 8.

Chris Craft runabouts used either a Chrysler flathead six, Packard 245-ci flathead six, or Gray Marine flathead six.

I don't think Buick offered either the small or large ohv straight eight as a marine version. Perhaps they didn't need the business, or the babbitt bearings retained through '48 were too expensive on overhaul?

But the Packard 1935-47 Packard One-Twenty 282-ci engine, as we know, was and is a good, dependable, husky engine. Did Packard figure it was superfluous, given the 245-ci six's durable, thriftier power? Or maybe it wouldn't take the sustained full-power flogging the marine six would, which was also used in severe taxi service.

?

Posted on: 2012/3/10 6:36
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When/where did worm-type hose clamps first appear?
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su8overdrive
Always wondered when the modern, superior worm-style hose clamps first appeared. An auld auto/aircraft/machinist friend who was around then says during WWII. Anyone know for sure, first application(s)? The CCCA still deducts points if you use anything but the original Mickey Mouse wire clamps on '30s cars, and i believe 1940, maybe '41.

Posted on: 2012/3/7 17:47
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Re: Powerful 46-47 Supers/Custom Supers
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su8overdrive
Veteran international driver Jean Trevoux campaigned a Delahaye at the first La Carrera Pan Americana in 1950, but for the '51 race, entered a '51 Packard 200 with the optional (for the 200) 327, tho' with four Stromberg carburetors on a log manifold and i'd like to see a picture of that engine bay. Trevoux won the first leg of the race, came in fifth overall.

He campaigned this or a similar Packard through '54, but i don't know the outcome of these later events. Recall reading about the driver/co-driver of a Ferrari America in one of the early '50s runs hitting an eagle at over 100 mph. The huge bird went through the windshield, between the two men, and out the back window. They drove on like nothing happened.

You see the crowds hugging the narrow roads in towns and villages, with literally just a couple feet between them and cars traveling 80mph. Whew.

Now, one of these days, someone, somewhere, somehow, is going to unearth some sanctioned top speeds of 1940-47 Buicks and Packards.

Posted on: 2012/3/7 5:13
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Closeness of 1942--47 senior Clipper tailpipe to gastank
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su8overdrive
Coupla longtime Packard friends who've owned, worked on these cars say the tailpipe is close, really close, to the side of the gastank. But since neither has access to a car like mine, can't check and tell me how close. So, any fellow 1942-47 160/180/Super/Custom Super Clipper on the standard 127" wheelbase (because limos might be different) owners, how much clearance on yours? An eighth of an inch, or ?

A Chevron engineer told us that gasoline lasts, stays fresh longest so long as it isn't exposed to heat above 80 degrees. Such is the case in my car's garage. Obviously, on a warm summer day, it gets warmer over the road. Packard wasn't building cars for occasional collector/hobbyist pleasure jaunts 65 years in the future.

Wondering if it's worth the bother to wrap that 12 or so inch section of tailpipe adjacent the gastank with heat insulation tape, or is that overkill?

Car's run fine all these years, never, ever vapor locked, nada. But curious if there's any according to Hoyle on this wee clearance.

Thanks.

Posted on: 2012/3/7 4:43
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Re: 1948 brake master cylinder question.
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su8overdrive
Always wondered when the modern, superior worm-style hose clamps first appeared. An auld auto/aircraft/machinist friend who was around then says during WWII. Anyone know for sure, first application(s)? The CCCA still deducts points if you use anything but the original Mickey Mouse wire clamps on '30s cars, and i believe 1940, maybe '41.

If your '48 327/radiator proximity is cramped as a '42-'47 356 Clipper, i feel your pain. Though mine wasn't seeping, as part of maintenance neurosis i decided to check that lower hose clamp for snugness. Had to find a stubbie screwdriver that still had just enough length to get leverage. Fun.

Posted on: 2012/3/7 4:27
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Re: Likely the most trivial question in
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su8overdrive
Gator and present Company-- Gentlemen, no need to apologize for "hi-jacking" the post. It's all Packard, it's all good.

Love these photographs of the vast Packard plant in happier days. Many thanks for posting these.

We're survivors. The factory's fate, dim. While my only decision, for the moment, is whether a steel gray or aluminum paint'll look better on the tailpipe aft of the muffler on my '47 Super, the above pictures give us all something to reflect on.

Meanwhile, it's hard to believe the sprawling East Grand factory, at least the parts of it not too far gone, couldn't be restored to host various small businesses, shops, boutiques, spas, something, anything, perhaps with local Packard owners' cars on rotating display, as part of enduring United States history.

Crying shame.

Posted on: 2012/3/6 19:59
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Re: Likely the most trivial question in
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su8overdrive
Thank you, gentlemen. HH56, i'm with you, usually, on being lowkey. In fact, after i had them replated, i painted the insides of my bumpers black. But since the rest of the exhaust system is already gray/silver from the manifold through the muffler, believe i'll paint the tailpipe a similar color, per Packard47. This is silly, since no one'll ever see it. Guess this is like R-R's handwork, finishing on the insides of doors, places no one ever sees.

Similarly, on the bumper guards--i rechromed but didn't use those heavyhanded,bulky postwar "fender shields (as Packard calls them in the parts book)" bumper extensions-- i used a razor to split black windshield wiper hose to make a trim bumper-protecting gasket.

Years later, walking down the street, i see a parked late-model Rolls Royce sedan with that done at the factory. Only car i ever saw that did that.

As written many times by many motoring journalists, all R-R ever had to recommend them was craftsmanship.

We know our Packards are better automobiles, so they deserve any paltry finesse we might bestow.

Now i gotta figure out what shade of silver/gray to use. Decisions, decisions. Life is cruel.

Posted on: 2012/3/5 16:49
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