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Board index » All Posts (fishnjim)




Red hardener painted blue.
#1
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Fish'n Jim
Like the old directions joke; go past the red house painted blue and turn left at the intersection. They switched colors on the body filler cream hardener across the board some time ago, and I didn't know of it. I don't use much filler, I like metal. I use more MEKP, clear stuff, as I do gelcoat work on the boat, fixing chips, etc. I bought some last year.
I had a few small weld imperfections to cover on an inner fender repair, so I got the old can out, no hardener. All fresh stuff is in the freezer and didn't want to wait on thaw.(BP loses 1% a month at room temp, prevent the filler from setting up) I didn't need much, so I go to the closest parts store down the street and all they got is blue. House brand filler too. I checked across the street, only more blue. I went to NAPA and all they had was blue. I see a pattern here! I bought blue. Conflicting store stories on whether it was the same. You can still get red, but they don't stock it. The chemist in me, decided to check, and it's the right peroxide/CAS. I used unknown tons of this peroxide, installed onsite storage, and we even made it at other locations. Looks like they did change the plasticizer though to ECHA. I suspect it's cheaper to get from China that way. It hardened, so no issue. Nothing worse than having to scrape off gooey sticky filler that didn't set up.
The internet "why" story is red bled through to top coat, but I've been using filler for nearly 60 years and never had any issue with bleed through. That's what primer is for. Could be artifact of water borne urethanes, but I don't use those, but doubt the story. More likely some body man messed up.
Plus it turned turquoise green, not blue, when I mixed it, so go figure? Maybe we'll have green next?

Posted on: 2/26 17:51
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Re: Body Mounts
#2
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Fish'n Jim
You have to unbolt and raise the body off the frame a tad to change the cushions. ie, take the weight off and space to replace with new ones. If the bolts are rusty, it can be a chore if they don't want to separate. And maybe a two man job, one holding wrench inside, one under. Get them all on with bolt in, lower, and then tighten it back up.
Surprised the outriggers are bad, but the body isn't corroded through as well? Thicker GA steel on the brace. Maybe another surprise waiting for you. And didn't you just have the carpet out?

I just replaced all them on my P/U truck and could not use impact they way they were arranged, inaccessible floating cage nuts. I didn't know they had an issue with the urethane and the "baja" construction zone ate them alive and other suspension parts - long story.
So you'll need some sort of lift or jack and way to reinforce the body/distribute the load. Usually, you can get them one by one on the outriggers, but since you're changing braces, it's a bit more complex. Times like these one wishes they have a lift or body twirler and take the whole thing up.
I couldn't get my twirler under the truck without a major mod to it. Time you get done fixing all the gremlins, you'll have a complete resto.

Posted on: 2/26 17:23
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Re: Water Injection Kits
#3
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Fish'n Jim
If it gets below 32F where you live, you may want to reconsider permanent installation.

Anytime one introduces water into combustion it lowers the combustion temperature by making steam which partially offsets the loss of exhaust gas thermal expansion to produce power.
It's an old proven heat balance concept for burning higher BTU fuels so the temperature isn't as hot. We used it to reduce NOx in our HW incinerator. Diesels now come with DEF injection, which is basically the same principle for NOx reduction, only they add urea to prevent the water from freezing.

Related:
I saw Biden EPA is going to try to approve E15 year round, which they were doing on the sly in summer/low fuel supply periods and not telling. FI vehicles don't experience the issues of ETOH fuels with carbs. Some FI vehicles can't use E15, so check around if it changes where you buy gas this year. The corn farmers are happy, but the environment suffers a tad, so pure poly-tics. Right now there's some refining outages driving gas prices, but crude supply is up, so prices should come down later. I don't expect them to be where we like them, crude is still above $80.

Posted on: 2/26 17:04
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Re: 22nd/23rd Series License Light Lens
#4
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Fish'n Jim
HH is right should be glass and "white", not yellow. Gasket in there too. All that era were still glass. I went through this but don't recall, I think I got one off internet somewhere. I'd have to research and see if there's one here for reference, if you don't find any.

I got turn NOS front signal fixtures from MM but suspect they'd all be gone by now. I'm sure some hoarder has them if they'll let go. That's half the battle in this sports, the "search". Parts unfortunately were never trained to come and find us. Sowing many seeds is a good choice. Leads come and go though.

Posted on: 2/19 13:00
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Re: Generator Terminals and Wire Gauges
#5
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Fish'n Jim
The shop manual should also have the complete wiring diagram and that will have the wire GA and insulation color. I know I got it, not sure in where.
Rules of thumb,
The connecting stud is usually sized for the proper terminal connector. If hole is too big or too small to fit, it's the wrong wire GA. Terminals come with a 2 size range typically, like 14-16, 18-20, etc. By good quality and stay away from the cheapo offshore stuff. International EC permits stuff that's "iffy".
6 VDC is typically larger GA due to increased amperage due to lower voltage. V=IR, R constant. Diam determines ampacity so non-linear, R^2 law.

Make sure you got a good crimper with the proper dies. Terminals can be obtained from the usual auto electric supplies or carriers. Del City, etc. Even though its nor OEM, I like to shrink wrap each connector. Gives a finished touch and prevents corrosion and puking apart. SAE doesn't permit soldering, but I don't see an issue if you want a better connection, however, residual acid solder flux should be removed. I only do it, if it's a single crimp w/o the insulation crimp. Plus the insulation may discolor and why it helps to shrink wrap.

Posted on: 2/19 12:51
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Re: 22nd Series Custom Eight Steering Wheel
#6
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Fish'n Jim
Quality Restorations, Inc is another west coast guy that's done "P"s. He quoted me about $750 back about 8-9 years ago. Not sure what he gets these days. Nothing is "indexed" in the hobby realm.

There's two methods, one is to repair/make whole with solid epoxy and paint, ie, the epoxy color won't match. Have to have all the trim wings and doo-dads, ie start with a complete wheel.
The other is to remove all the factory plastic and put in a mold and recast as original. That's what the best resto do. They have to have a mold for your particular wheel.
I started to epoxy repair the one on the '49 and it's a chore when in sad condition. I figured I'd just replace w/ custom steering column/wheel & PS, if it ever gets done.
For the Cad, it wasn't that bad, no missing pieces but ugly, I got a 2 tone "Wheelskins" leather cover that you stitch on. They're < $100 /complete kit. Quite nice and affordable and looks good. That could be an easy out here.

Posted on: 2/19 12:35
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Re: '50 Ultramatic Trans Cooler Lines
#7
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Fish'n Jim
Not sure what's going on here. Car isn't running.
Service councilor 26 is listing for '52, not '50.
There's a complete Ultramatic (700pps) service bulletin covering all years in the literature archive.
Best to start there.

Posted on: 1/25 16:25
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Re: '50 Ultramatic Trans Cooler Lines
#8
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Fish'n Jim
I suspect that running them together is suggested because the internal rad mounted also warms the fluid at cold start-up.
With a front exchanger only, may not get to operating temperature and cause sluggish shifting for a while or for the duration. No direct experience, just engr'g practice.

Personally, if your trans is 'overheating' or requiring additional cooling beyond factory, it's due to service/load changes, towing, hilly, etc. or fault in the trans. If that's the case and not just exploring available period options, I'd first opt for a thorough machine cleaning and fluid change depending on the maintenance history. Particulate settles out in the radiator trans coolers, too. Just servicing the trans won't get that and it just recirculates leading to excessive wear.

They did a lot of things in those days that today don't make much sense on inspection. You'll see a lot of new items that come and go each year as the technology was being perfected. Automatics are in their infancy in this period. P was a little more sluggish in that regard with sales lagging expectations while sticking to outmoded, but proven, designs compared to competition. They were more conservative and high end historically.

Posted on: 1/24 10:47
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Re: Engine ID
#9
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Fish'n Jim
Be advised that combo weighs in around 1000 lbs for 135 HP and will be quite front heavy in an "A" and be longer than a flat 8.
May require frame mods, sectioning, etc.
There are examples on the internet, some turbo charged.

Posted on: 1/24 10:21
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Re: ARM RESToration
#10
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Fish'n Jim
Not sure exactly what the plastic is, mostly tenite and PVC in that era.
Tenite is known for the white film degradation. See link below.
I was surprised the surface wasn't more disturbed requiring body work, if that occurred, so maybe something just contaminating. Must have been living a sedate garaged life. When they sit out in the sun with the windows up and the internal temp can reach the Tg of some of the plastics, they'll have no choice but to move/crack, etc..
I don't know what the mechanism of bending/distortion was but it's either from plastic shrinkage along residual molding stress lines or swelling/deformation of the door card and pushing/tensioning on the arm rest(creep). I doubt 'over' tightening would do much except crack the parts. Dimensional stability of early plastics was not that good/not scientific. '50s is the infancy of 'modern' plastics. Today, they model out the injection molding, custom formulate the material, etc. in the design of the parts where in those edisonian daze it was just make parts best guess and throw them out if they weren't right, aka trial by error.

Anyway - looks nice and good work all around.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenite

Posted on: 1/22 12:51
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