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Board index » All Posts (TimCole)




Re: Packard Blue Crossreference?
#1
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Tim Cole
There aren't many examples to reference and there are historical misrepresentations as well. For example, the Central Railroad of New Jersey used something they called Packard Blue that was too light.

Hirsch offered a Packard Blue that wasn't too bad. Attached is an old picture of what looks like Packard Blue. I do have a snap shot of the Hirsch color on a Packard 12, but it is in storage.

If everything is a dead end, I would go to the old formula and try to come up with something myself. Get the darkest blue I can find, add a proportion of black, light green, and white to get what I want and then move on from there.
However, these modern materials are expensive and they only sell minimum quantities.

Attach file:



jpg  5960.jpg (22.05 KB)
373_62fe38b07ccc5.jpg 518X522 px

Posted on: Today 8:04
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Re: Strange water flow problem 288 cu in engine
#2
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Tim Cole
The best way to fill a cooling system is by using a tool called a vacuum filler which uses vacuum to fill all of the voids in a cooling system. Nearly all modern cars require that method except mine which is an oddball.

I made up such a hand operated device for use on Packards using a cow milking pump to avoid hot spots in rebuilt motors that had thermostats.

Anyway, that is probably not your problem. If both heater hoses are getting hot with the heater valve open then the water pump is working. You may have a restriction in the lower part of the radiator that came loose; like a mouse nest and the sudden release caused the gush. If the motor is still doing it every time it runs, the lower radiator hose may have a collapse in it.

When I was doing prototype work air pockets were isolated via thermocouples which reported hots spots on a data logger. A critical aspect of motor engineering.

Posted on: 8/15 16:32
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#3
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Tim Cole
Apologies are not required. One thing I learned from the Bush administration is how to shrug off being wrong.

For those pictures of the mystery part if you go onto the junknet you can download a free program called PIXresizer.

Posted on: 8/14 10:20
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#4
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Tim Cole
Okay, so when you said "sending unit" I assumed you were referring to the oil level sending unit.

Whatever it is a picture is required, because the pump feed goes to the regulator then through the filter and back to the engine.

As for when Packard stopped the oil level feature, this is one situation in which I hope I am wrong because the parts book lists the 12th series (1935) as having it. If that is wrong that also calls into question these painted radiator shells on eight cylinder cars and what not that have been causing me indigestion given that, after researching thousands of period pictures, I found only one such verifiable period example (excluding black out cars where all chrome was painted), and that probably was done by the dealer.

Posted on: 8/13 7:52
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#5
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Tim Cole
Are you sure the tube shaped object isn't the float for the oil level gauge? Packard couldn't make up their minds on how to do it so they dropped it in 1936.

Posted on: 8/12 9:07
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Re: packards in tv and movies
#6
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Tim Cole
Here is one from "Girl Gang" 1954. A 120 is used as a backdrop. The plot of this low budget deal is a dope addict dealer gives heroin shots to high school girls and sends them out to murder people.

Attach file:



png  Snapshot 1 (8-12-2022 9-43 AM).png (58.76 KB)
373_62f65a5dd899d.png 458X258 px

Posted on: 8/12 8:49
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Re: Another one bites the dust
#7
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Tim Cole
If that is a plastic body the ad would read as such: "F150 chassis on crafted body blah, blah blah ..."

Made to be driven as in when the speed limit on the Merritt Parkway was 35 mph.

If you are not willing to accept limitations then you don't like the cars.

The fact that a 1930 Packard is a 45 mph car doesn't bother me because I want to hear that gear whine. I want to shift that crash transmission. I want that big straight 8. I want to admire a powertrain that doesn't have one piece of plastic in it.

I am thoroughly satisfied with my modern car and have no interest in putting those parts into an old Packard with the commensurate garbage result.

These junkrods are like bolting a Fender pick up onto a vintage violin so it can be used at a punk rock concert. Senseless destruction.

Posted on: 8/10 8:14
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Re: Super 8 Oil Screen
#8
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Tim Cole
Actually, I'm not really sure because it has been a long time. The part number for that screen changed in 1934. Prior to that the screen had to come out to access the oil pressure relief valve, but with 1934 they introduced pressure and flow regulation so that was no longer necessary.

Still, there is no indication in the parts book that the screen will not pull out by carefully using a 90 degree pick on either side.

Cleaning that thing is part of annual maintenance when the car was new.

Posted on: 8/10 7:41
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Re: Another one bites the dust
#9
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Tim Cole
I was reading an interview with a contractor for Trump Tower and he said that the materials used for the customer units were the cheapest garbage possible and were cheaper than what are used for welfare housing units. Yet the sales literatures reads like "Only the finest craftsmanship and materials ..."

That is what these junkrod ads read like.

Especially crap like "owned for twenty years and driven 600 miles..."; only 20 miles a year? Isn't that corroboration as to these things being junk? If you used your 29 Packard to buy groceries you would put more miles than that on it.

Posted on: 8/9 6:50
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Re: Another one bites the dust
#10
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Tim Cole
About the only good thing about getting old is I can look forward to being rid of the pain I feel when I see these pieces of junk.

The same pain I feel when I see a good looking girl selling herself for heroin.

Posted on: 8/8 9:25
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