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   All Posts (Tim Cole)


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Re: Concept Models Art
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2007/10/28 7:49
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30% eh. The most crooked corporate run casinos don't get 30%. The most crooked front end loads on Wall Street aren't near 30%. I have seen some crooked annuity policies with 30% in the front end, but at least nothing in the back end. Only soda pop and bottled water are a bigger rip off.

Maybe they should put that stuff an junkbay and get an honest deal.

Posted on: 4/28 8:33:40
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Re: What Hood Ornament is seen on the 1933 Macauley Speedster ?
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It's a rabbit. There are pictures floating around. It's an ugly little thing.

Posted on: 4/27 16:02:33
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Re: Nickel Plated Front Cowl and Hood
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The Roosevelt car had bullet proof doors made out of magnesium so they burned up.

The sad part was all of the cars were low mileage originals. The assumption was a boat owner burned the place down to collect insurance, but if the cars didn't have the batteries disconnected somebody could have been playing with the dome lights or something and started the fire.

Billy Hirsch had a Cadillac 75 catch fire because the hand brake ratchet caught the dome light harness. After that he was a disconnect switch believer.

As for the chrome hoods, here is one that survived into the 1960's and was probably chopped to make a touring car or roadster.

Attach file:



jpg  Chrome Hood 745.JPG (33.71 KB)
373_5ea3a8039bfad.jpg 597X268 px

Posted on: 4/24 19:45:00
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Re: Fun with used cars
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Gee, I hope you aren't taking any unnecessary risks with these activities. Where I am it's wall to wall death. The two for profit hospitals are shutting down, the doctors and nurses are getting sick, the grocery workers are getting sick, and I haven't been out the front door since Sunday when I went for a 30 mile drive to charge the battery in my car.

If my employer saw me posting pictures like that they wouldn't let me back in the building. One infected person would cost the place millions of dollars.

Posted on: 4/24 5:52:55
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Re: 1940 Packard Super 8 160 Station Wagon (Cantrell) Factory Air Conditioning!
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What I was meant was that the story about the car being built with air conditioning is a load of crap. There are pictures floating around of that thing from the Harrah period where it doesn't have the unit.

Cutting a hole in the roof, bolting on a wrecking boom, and then saying it is a special order with air conditioning would be no less ridiculous.

I haven't seen that clunker up close (nor do I want to) but even from afar there are aspects of it that indicate the body is a reproduction as well and that all of the stories floating around about its origins are spurious.

Posted on: 4/21 4:36:19
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Re: Nickel Plated Front Cowl and Hood
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That car in the pictures bugs me. It looks like a fake.

Posted on: 4/16 13:33:27
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Re: Nickel Plated Front Cowl and Hood
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I think it was Fred Duggan. JC Taylor made a big deal about the claim because they were thrilled to write a check for cars that were underinsured. I don't know the details of the cars only that one was a Custom Super Clipper and another was a station wagon both of which didn't burn up. One that did burn up was the Roosevelt parade car. The garage was probably an arson case because the place also stored boats. As the fire moved through the building the horn of each car that was burning would go off. After the fire the crankcases were all melted and the motor remnants were sitting on the floor. (on second thought, it was boat engines sitting on the floor where a boat once was)

Back to the plated hood thing, there were a few of those special jobs put out. I don't know where they went, but the sedans that made it into the 1950's probably were turned into touring cars.

Posted on: 4/16 5:50:46
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Packard Slings the Bull
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Here is an amusing blurb from the 1942 service letters in reference to tire pressures supposedly being higher in the 1942 cars. I checked and they weren't.

"We are receiving more criticisms on body rattles and harsh ride than ever before. They are not the fault of the car. It is such an easy matter for you to head off these complaints and prevent customer disastisfaction (sic) that there is no reason why the criticisms should exist."

Nothing turns off customers like telling them they don't know what they are talking about.

The old senior cars were better riding. A low mileage 38-39 Twelve is unbelievably good. It's hard to describe the first impression one gets after going a few blocks. Way better than any of these modern cars including those crazy pick up trucks that are being marketed as family vehicles.

Posted on: 4/14 18:22:38
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Re: Auction: '50 Super Eight, Stillwater, MN, June 6, 2020
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We all are going to lose some weight in the near future. I've cut my caloric intake around 50%. Home exercise is probably not a good idea either because it wastes food. The more I look at this thing the more I'm inclined to think the virus survives as an aerosol - that is, it has sufficient coating to float without moisture - which accounts for the highly contagious nature.

For people working on their cars, doing such alone is probably the best practice although not the safest. Given hospitals are loaded with the dead and dying doing any activity involving injury risk is best avoided.

Fortunately, my background in mathematics allows me to consume my days working on applied differential equations. On the news they said government computer systems are broken down because they use old computer languages that not many people know how to program. Well, I did main frame computing for years, but they threw me out because I don't wear knee pads. When I look back on the talented people that were crapped on by management I get sick. So they they can suck it!

Personally, I suspect I have the stupid thing but my immune system has been slow to react to it. So it sits there making me suspicious. If I start detecting it and develop a fever the disease will respond by a massive attempt to escape by overwhelming my respiratory tract to get into the air and move to someone else. Think of it as a survival strategy. In rabies the virus survives by inducing an uncontrollable influence to bite and hold. Time will tell, but in the end this may become a chronic illness like Lyme disease only much more deadly.

Posted on: 4/14 6:31:59
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Re: Auction: '50 Super Eight, Stillwater, MN, June 6, 2020
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In the UK they are talking about having townspeople handle the harvesting of produce just like the 15th century. The plagues lasted over a century long period and the striking thing about this new disease is that, with all of the medical technology, the recovery rate is no better than during the 1918 flu. As well, places like Brazil have governments declaring the disease "the new hoax" which creates potential for mutations into something more virulent. Additionally, a lot of corporate managers are clinging to the notion of a "hoax" and no worse than a cold. 29 dead police officers in New York City seems a little worse than a sniffle. I find it amazing that it was the UAW that had to declare a strike to shut down Michigan.

Today's crossword puzzle clue: "Seven letter anagram for dumbass" Answer: manager.

All of this points to pressure on discretionary spending.

Posted on: 4/13 5:14:30
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