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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15255
Actually, the belts had to be removed to completely disengage the compressor when AC came back in 53 and 54 too. With prewar units it was just part of the yearly changeover. Belts off in winter and heater shutoff valve turned on to allow hot water flow into the heaters. In spring it was the reverse, belts on and heater valve off. Hopefully the weather co-operated fully and any of the in between days where you either froze or sweltered were few and far between.

Packard suggested removing the belts in winter to completely eliminate the evaporator from being cooled. On the 40 units Packard also tried to put the heater in the same box so I suppose it was more important to remove the belts on those cars. The heater apparently did not work very well in the same unit so was removed for the 41-42 cars. Since the units were in an enclosed box in the trunk, even if the evaporator was cold there was no air circulation without the blower running. I suppose you could actually leave the belts on year round as long as you did not mind the extra drag of the compressor. This was particularly true in prewar systems since there was no outside air path into the unit. Postwar, it got a bit more problematic since there was ducting to bring fresh outside air into the unit and if one of those air valves was not closed then driving down the road could force air thru the unit and a bit of cold air entered the car. In theory extra cooling did not happen in postwar units even with the compressor running because those units had an electric solenoid valve and if the AC was off the refrigerant was shunted around the evaporator and could do no cooling unless there was some kind of problem in the solenoid valve or plumbing. Prewar units had a mechanical valve for the shunting so there was no absolute turn off without removing the belts.

From all accounts I have read the AC could freeze you out so in that respect it worked very well. Packard ads say the car with AC was like blowing air over several tons of ice. Since there was only a single air outlet in the middle of the package shelf air flow to the driver was not the greatest so like the post war units, to get the driver and front seat passenger cooled off the rear seat passengers were in an ice box and also had to listen to the sound of the air being forced thru the outlet just behind their heads. Once the car interior was cooled then the blower could be slowed down and was a bit quieter. The cold and dehumidified air was definitely better than any alternative even it if was not quite perfected.

Anxiously awaiting archiveman's book for the additional tidbits he will undoubtedly turn up.

Posted on: 8/13 6:40:59
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Howard
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2008/10/10 7:29
From grand rapids, mi, usa
Posts: 966
The tons of ice is more directly connected - AC units are still sometimes rated in "tons" - and it means the thermal energy to freeze/melt a ton of ice

Posted on: 8/13 7:07:26
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2014/6/21 15:28
From Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 377
How efficient were the ice-makers? Were they consistently reliable?

Perhaps, like some "innovations," they were more trouble than they were worth.

as always
Garrett M

Posted on: 8/13 9:03:18
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2015/5/19 9:01
From Central Texas, near Austin
Posts: 67
8-13-9

Hi Skateboardgumby,

That's a million dollar question. Apart from several 1941 Packard factory photos of the Cellarette while demonstrated, the New York, Chicago, and San Francisco auto shows, the Chicago Auto Show flyer, and a demonstration photo and article in the San Francisco Examiner, the one known 1941 Packard is elusive. At least one was built and served as a halo model for the 1941 Packard. No auto show photos of the car are available.

The last seen Cellarette-equipped 1941 Packard Custom Super-8 One-Eighty Touring Sedan, model 1907, body 1442, was, according to a California source, a dark blue sedan. That was about 1965.

The effectiveness of the formation of ice cubes formed in the trays also remains unknown.

Does anyone know about the whereabouts of the 1941 Packard equipped with the Cellarette?

Thanks, archiveman2977

Posted on: 8/13 9:26:58
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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Joined:
2014/6/21 15:28
From Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 377
I can't imagine an in-car ice maker being very efficient even today. So, one can only imagine that such technology in 1941 was probably so overly-designed and finicky in function, that it just wasn't worth the money or effort to get it to work properly.

Only in the movies could you imagine Gary Grant and Myrna Loy merrily enjoying iced-cocktails while riding in the backseat of a 1941 Packard.

as always
Garrett Meadows

Posted on: 8/17 6:20:35
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2008/6/10 13:46
From Packardia
Posts: 5095
Quote:
...With prewar units it was just part of the yearly changeover...

Howard (HH56), thanks for clarification.

Posted on: 8/20 16:50:16
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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Joined:
2008/6/10 13:46
From Packardia
Posts: 5095
"A factory photo is available of a 40 160 in a Packard dealer showroom demonstrating "The new air conditioned Packard". There is also a dealer trade letter (T-3009 dated 5/10/40) which makes reference that "it takes approximately six weeks for production because of time required to get this equipment from our supplier". It also said for the balance of the year it was only available on the 160 and 180 but in 41 it would be available on the entire line. Another dealer letter from 1/16/40 is an offer for an adaptor kit to mount a 1 hp electric motor in the car to power the compressor for showroom demo cars."

source: JT, posted November 2, 2002 at -> forums.aaca.org
Followers of the a.m. link will be amply rewarded with PFH entertainment, starring Pete as Pete, who brought Pete into focus under the direction of Pete.

Posted on: 8/20 16:50:29
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2015/5/19 9:01
From Central Texas, near Austin
Posts: 67
8-21-19

Hi Guscha,

You are spot-on as usual about the documentation for the 1940 Packard air-conditioning.

My 1940 Packard A/C chapter includes the 1-16-40 and 5-10-40 trade/dealer letters, plus the Packard Dallas showroom image of customers who lined up to experience cooled air in the 1940 Packard 160 demonstrator.

I supplemented the image with an exterior view of the beautifully designed, art-deco style Packard Dallas building which opened in December 1939. Incidentally, it was the first Packard dealer to air-condition its showroom.

Thanks again,
archiveman2977

Posted on: 8/21 8:55:13
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2008/6/10 13:46
From Packardia
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Quote:
...The other chapters in Volume 1 of an illustrated history of automotive air-conditioning are: 1941, 1942 Packard, 1941 Cadillac, and 1941, 1942 Chrysler/Imperial...

The mention and numbering of volume 1 suggest the idea of a 2nd volume. Could you provide a look out on the following chapters? Something European?

Posted on: 8/29 10:09:23
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Re: 1941 PACKARD MAKES ICE CUBES
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2008/6/10 13:46
From Packardia
Posts: 5095
The Indianapolis Sunday Star reports on March 24, 1940 on the first of the Packard cars to include a revolutionary method of automobile air conditioning.

Attach file:



jpg  number one.jpg (485.18 KB)
757_5d68b86deabd7.jpg 1245X1914 px

Posted on: 8/29 22:47:25
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