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Re: Lost History
#11
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gone1951
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Quote:
i do see the value in small driveability mods like electric fuel pumps.



I think electric fuel pumps fall into the same category as all other mods. Fuel pressure is fuel pressure. The carburetor doesn't know what is supplying the pressure. The float valve in the carb limits the level of fuel in the carb. A mechanical fuel pump doesn't have any trouble keeping up with 10 to 15 miles per gallon fuel consumption. These cars ran just fine for 50+ years on mechanical fuel pumps. If the fuel pump doesn't work rebuild or replace it.



Note: As far as mods go, I do have to admit that radial tires on a car that is to be driven every day at highway speeds makes a lot os sense from a safety standpoint.


Added Note: I should have read the full posting before I put my two cents worth in. He does have a point regarding the gas evaporating from the float bowl in the carb when a car sits for extended periods of time however that was happening before electric fuel pumps as well. To me it's all part of the experience.

Posted on: 2009/1/1 13:48
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Re: Lost History
#12
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mikec
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Not trying to start an argument here...

If you saw my sheds, garage, and general property, you would understand i enjoy 'the experience' of old machinery immensly.

My whole life i have been working with old stuff, and some of the old stuff still works regularly.

I know what your saying though, and my past project (66 dodge dart) still had a mechanical pump and it never gave me trouble, except when the old one cracked and started spraying fuel onto the distributer. that was scary.

Posted on: 2009/1/1 15:15
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Re: Lost History
#13
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gone1951
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Quote:
I know what your saying though, and my past project (66 dodge dart) still had a mechanical pump and it never gave me trouble, except when the old one cracked and started spraying fuel onto the distributer. that was scary.


Never had one split open. Must have been an experience. Do you still have the dart? I have never been a fan of the 70's and up Chrysler products. I have had two 55 Desoto's. They were great cars with a small 291 hemi engine. I did inherit my dad's 1973 charger. Nice body but the car is so thin and tinny I would not have bought it myself. BTW the Dodge is and will stay stock right down to it's 318 and I guess a torqueflight trans. The wheel covers are stock as well.

Posted on: 2009/1/1 21:17
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Re: Lost History
#14
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mikec
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its actually happened to two of my vehicles. the first time it was my old cummins, and it just leaked a few drips now and then. the dart was a steady stream. the car had the old 225 leaning tower of power, so the fuel pump was right near the distributer.

i sold the dart to make room for the Packard. i didnt want to, but i nneeded the space. I love mopars, at least untill the early 70s, then not again till the 89 dodge/cummins rigs were introduced. I have a 91and love it.


sorry to hijack the thread......

Posted on: 2009/1/1 21:50
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Re: Lost History
#15
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Loyd Smith
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My 55th Series Patrician had a '56 T/U in it when I got it, as well as a Twin Traction differential and was in pretty rough shape, generally. Like many others in this hobby, my financial resources are limited enough that I couldn't afford a complete authentic restoration under any circumstances whatsoever. I have endeavoured to keep the car as Packard and as original as my finances allow whilst keeping it on the road. Like Clipper 47, I too was around in the 1950s and, as a result, probably do not consider these cars (nor the late '30s and '40s ones) quite as, "antique," as some younger hobbyists. I respect the cars but remember some of the problems with them when they were in general, daily use - as well as some of the, "modifications," that were done to them when they were almost new in order to make them more dependable in daily use (like not bothering to put a '55 tranny and rear-end in one when improved '56 ones were available and would fit). I would never put a small block GM engine in a Packard, nor replace its transmission with a non-Packard supplied one but my car sports modern air-conditioning, an alternator (albeit 12V positive-ground), an Edelbrock carburettor, radial tires, the original (completely rebuilt) brake system with an aftermarket top-fill reservoir and a Pertronix electronic ignition module in the distributor (and another in the glove box) - as well as the perfectly Packard and functional 56th series parts that came on it. The generator, generator bracket, Rochester 4CG carburettor and everything else that I've replaced are still in the shed and have been rebuilt for anyone who acquires the car after I've passed away. If they don't like the '56 parts, they'll have to find those on their own. As long as I am alive and can drive - I'm going to use the car. If I can't get in it in the morning and drive it to California from Florida, I don't have much use for it. I love Packards of any era. If I had the money for an authentic, frame-off restoration, I would still have an Edelbrock carb, (I was replacing 4CGs with Hollys and Carters when they came new on cars - again, my preference) alternator and, probably, a modern air-conditioning system (I could neither find the missing parts nor anyone who'd work on the old York system).

As it is, I've spent more money on this car than I would've done had I bought a new one, like it better and drive it (it's the ONLY car that I own). I'm going to use it and certainly do not intend to deprive myself of the experience merely because I cannot afford the expense of a frame-off complete and authentic restoration. That being said, when I die whoever gets it next can do with it what they will and will have everything that I've taken off of it except the A/C (there wasn't much left of it). In the interim there's a Packard in daily use for people to see who've never heard of Packard and the car does what it was supposed to do in the first place; that being getting me, dependably and comfortably wherever it is that I'm going and back again. Packards are the cats pyjamas in my estimation. There's never in my mind been anything to compare with them. That being said, however - I've got no more use for a Packard that I can't use than for a Cheby that I can't use.

Posted on: 2009/1/2 9:13
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Re: Lost History
#16
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gone1951
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Loyd Smith wrote,

Quote:
As it is, I've spent more money on this car than I would've done had I bought a new one, like it better and drive it (it's the ONLY car that I own).



Loyd, I bet not too many people can say they only have one car and drive it every day and it's a Packard. I have other cars but prefer the Packard. I probably haven't put a tank of gas in my other car in the last 3 years. Only drive the Packard.


Anyone else have a one car garage with a Packard in it?

Posted on: 2009/1/2 12:40
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