The Most Comprehensive Free Online Reference for Packard Owners
Become a member of Packard Motor Car Information, right now! (it's free)
Login
Username:

Password:

remember me

Lost Password?

Register now!
FAQ's
Main Menu
Recent Forum Topics
Who's Online
37 user(s) are online (20 user(s) are browsing Packard Forums)

Members: 1
Guests: 36

Logan, more...


« 1 2 3 (4) 5 6 7 ... 1507 »


Re: 1937 wheel cylinders
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
Kanter lists two kits. The Deluxe kit includes everything including new master and wheel cylinders while the other kit includes hoses and shoes etc but just the rebuild pieces for the old master and wheel cylinders. They also sell individual hoses, cylinders and the other parts.

I can speak for the deluxe kit for a 47 Custom and the wheel cylinders did have the same type bleeders that are used on other postwar cars which I would call modern. Those cylinders plus the master, shoes, hoses, and mechanical parts all fit perfectly with one minor exception. The minor exception was the copper sealing washers that go on the master to seal the connection between the cylinder, banjo fitting and attaching bolt were not included. No idea if they might have started including them on todays kits since it has been several years since I bought mine. As I recall, the rear cylinders did need an adapter to fit the original size line but those were included in the kit.

If you buy a kit just be sure to ask if the washers are part of the kit and have them included if not. 47 at least uses odd size washers not readily stocked in the typical under the counter copper washer kits the parts stores have. It took a trip to several local parts stores to match and find them. Napa carried both sizes individually but not necessarily either or both were found at each store. I know on several occasions Kanter has offered to mail them out for free if people needed the washers and called to ask for them but that takes an extra few days if you are in the middle of a project. No idea if 37 uses the same sizes.

I also bought their brake line kit. At the time that kit apparently was only available in stainless steel and made by a vendor. There was an issue with the vendor making and sending an incorrect kit first time out. Kanter and the vendor immediately remade it to have the proper items. The lines fit with no major problems but I found the stainless hard to work with compared to regular steel or the Cunifer lines you can make yourself or maybe get from other vendors.

Their website says their main offices are closed but they are taking phone and online orders.

Posted on: 5/8 14:58:02
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1924 Distributor
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
You didn't mention a model but if your car is a model 136, 143, 236, or 243 eight with a Delco distributor then from the parts detail shown on page 11 of the 23-25 parts manual http://www.packardinfo.com/xoops/html ... PackardEightPartsList.pdf the black box is a condenser. There is a similar box on the parts shown for a 21 - 22 single six distributor if the later cars used the same distributor.

Posted on: 5/8 11:59:34
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
Maybe but the lid is fairly heavy and there is not much room or surface area for them to press against so the wave washers would need to be small. For a 6-32 diameter pin I think the washer diameter will be larger than the lid surface and would stick out. If washers were cut down they might not have much strength. I would also think after a few open and close cycles the plastic would wear so the washers loose whatever additional friction they might provide.

Posted on: 5/7 9:51:40
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
I could probably come up with one of my better rejects. It would be good for something that is not a calamity if lost or damaged so would not be a big deal when it gets examined and then dropped on the floor when someone faints after the guy mentions the price. For the scan it is still a copy of a repaired original and I would not want to see it used to make a dimensional drawing. For an actual scan it would be so much better If you have an original from one of your cars so he can see the crispness and get a scan with all the correct dimensions.

IMO no matter what method makes the repro a vent is going to need to be replaced in its entirety. Make a good copy and you can replace only one side but unless both parts of the repro vent are made with exact repros of the original steel dies and material there is going to be something in the repro that will not match well with an original mating half. A modern compound may not have the same expansion properties so might not fit when trying to replace just one part and keep an original other piece.

Leeedy mentioned he thinks a repro needed the original weight and details. To me the weight and hidden detail is not as big an issue as is having the visible part have almost a perfect correct look and be made out of a material with a high temperature deforming point. The high temp epoxy I was last experimenting with has a heat deform up to 350 degrees if a post cure is done. 250 without the post cure but even the lesser temp should be adequate. I have not measured but expect the dash would not get that close to 250 or else the pad or other things in the car would have serious issues. The too short of working time or pot life of the last plastic compound I found is rated at 250 as well.

Actually, I think a lighter opening part and some mostly hidden improvements would be better. The originals are held in the open position by friction from a pair of felt pads pushing against the sides of the bottom part. The pads wear or maybe shrink and first thing you know, you are driving down the road and as some small disturbance occurs you watch the lid drop closed. There is more than one vent out there that is helped stay in the upright position by a piece of cardboard stuck down the side or shoved under one of the louver slots. There could also be something done with the hinge portion to maybe use a smaller screw with a thru hole that would leave more of the plastic material in place for added strength.

The exact size felt Packard used for the friction hold does not seem to be easily found so to replace that you need to cobble something together out of a modern equivalent to approximate the thickness and size. That then needs to be glued into the slot. IMO, it would be advantageous to modernize that part with a lighter lid and maybe something like a spring pushing against friction material to keep a more even pressure. One of my versions has a provision for that spring loaded approach. The extra part for the spring is not easily seen when the vent is open. I have also toyed with a long 2-56 or 4-40 stainless steel allen head screw instead of the 6-32 brass stud Packard used as a hinge pin. Either would need a smaller thru hole which would leave almost double the amount of plastic for strength. An Allen screw would only need the larger hole a short distance thru thicker material for the screw head clearance.

Posted on: 5/7 8:16:41
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
No drawings. My silicone molds are directly cast from a damaged original that I glued back together with epoxy and filled any left over cracks and defects with Bondo. After several mold making sessions it is now somewhat the worse for wear again.

Posted on: 5/6 14:51:40
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
Quote:

PackardDon wrote:
Interesting to learn that the vents are plastic! I thought they were zinc castings as that’s what mine feel like. Fortunately my dash is hanging upside down on the wall so they’re safe. They should be easy reproduce, though, so I wonder if anyone has tried. If not, I might give it a go.


Believe me, I have been trying to reproduce them on and off for 30 years. The originals appear to have been pressure cast in multi part metal molds which is not a real option unless you have very deep pockets for a tool and die maker to make the molds. For a repro today it might be interesting to see what a scanner and 3D printer could do but I think it will mostly be limited to silicone molds of an original which have several drawbacks. If you have patience and the ability to think in 3D when making the mold then I would hope you are able to perfect both the mold and the vents. The vent availability is almost nil now so if those in the cars survive unbroken another generation it will be a miracle.

As you will note, the vents are somewhat complex with many thin sections and areas that when a mold is made are very prone to trapping the mold material making it very difficult if not impossible to remove the casting without destroying the mold. The mold needs to be in multiple sections and getting multiple mold sections of the original in silicone that cope with those removal restrictions and can also be held seamlessly matched together for the casting is one thing. A fairly slow gravity pouring or even using light pressure to force material into filling thin channels without deforming the silicone or trapping air is another. That air entrapment alone makes pouring a casting somewhat tedious and time consuming so needs a material with a thin viscosity.

The next problem is the pourable general purpose urethane casting material I have found has a variety of working time or pot life. Downside to those with a decent work time and low viscosity is they almost all have a low stable temp of 100-165 degrees. I am concerned a car sitting in hot sun would have a dash top that gets hot enough the plastic would weaken or completely deform. One urethane material I found with a decent stable temp of over 250 degrees has a very short working time of less than 3 minutes. That is not enough working time to mix, vacuum and gravity pour thru thin mold channels before it hardens.

A high temp epoxy I found has good working time but is also somewhat brittle in thin section. Not quite as strong as the original bakelite but maybe an alternative. It can be thinned to a usable viscosity (with drawbacks) and injected under light hand pressure. If I were ever to get interested in pursuing the vent project again that will be the material I try to perfect or maybe something you could look at.

What I made for my car is out of the low temp stuff and is very presentable but I will not offer them to others because of the deform possibility. I just try to avoid hot temps in my car and so far that hasn't been a problem since the car hardly ever leaves the garage.

Here are the pair I made and used plus photos of just a very few of many rejects and the last set of molds I made.

Attach file:



jpg  IMG_0641.jpg (97.59 KB)
209_5eb30467595c2.jpg 1280X682 px

jpg  IMG_0838.jpg (127.21 KB)
209_5eb30a30125b0.jpg 1280X960 px

jpeg  Rejects out of low temp urethane.jpeg (106.73 KB)
209_5eb30a6d3795f.jpeg 1280X960 px

jpeg  silicone molds.jpeg (73.92 KB)
209_5eb30a7d0311b.jpeg 1280X960 px

Posted on: 5/6 12:01:52
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
Just FYI in case it was removed with the install of the modern radio. The original radio tuner section has a stud on the back of the case which is for a strap screwed to the bottom of the defroster channel. Purpose is to take the majority of the weight of the radio head. The holes in the dash keep it firmly located but the strap has the bulk of the job keeping the head level and unable to vibrate.

Just to reiterate what Leeedy said about the AC vents. Guard them with your life and if you have an unbroken pair then consider yourself exceedingly fortunate and be very careful mounting them and also in opening and closing them. The hinge pins at the back of the lid section go thru a very thin section of the bakelite and are exceedingly weak. That is where most of the vents are broken and there is not much in the way of repair other than trying to mold a strong enough surface that can be finished and painted out of an epoxy product. Cross your fingers and toes that it can be reinforced under the lid with a very thin metal which can be molded in the epoxy and will hold onto what is available of the original bakelite longer than the first time the lid is opened again. The threaded portion of the hinge which is part of the vent bottom and screwed to the dash top is a bit stronger but carelessness or extra force cause those to break off too.

Finding serviceable vents is indeed an issue. There was what a seller called an almost NOS set that went for, if I remember, $1500 on ebay three or four years back. A set that looked serviceable but also like there might have been some damage went for near a thousand and those are the only ones I have seen offered.

Here is a view of the firewall showing the strap for the radio head.

Attach file:



jpg  radio strap.jpg (325.16 KB)
209_5eb2eb828be16.jpg 1004X610 px

Posted on: 5/6 10:07:36
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Early 30's radio antenna
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
The earliest book I have that shows the running board antenna is the 38 accessory book. No idea if whatever was called an undercar antenna mentioned in the earlier install instructions was the same as the running board antenna but I would imagine it must be something similar suspended somewhere under the car.

There was no accessory section in the 35-41 parts book as there was in some of the postwar books so probably any part number would be on a dealer accessory sheet or price list.

Attach file:



jpg  running board.jpg (197.66 KB)
209_5eb1d0b87c92d.jpg 944X678 px

Posted on: 5/5 13:46:53
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 1956 executive disc brake conversion kits
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
The late Craig Hendrickson was one of the first to perform and document the installation of disc brakes and a modern master/booster unit on a V8 55-56 model. His method was done using non kit items and is shown on his still active Panther website under the Conversion Projects heading. While the booster/master cylinder unit and method would be identical, due to the drum size difference between his senior 55 Patrician and the junior Clipper cars the wheel parts he used would not be identical. A few have done his booster/master with pedal mods but since the pedal look and position is so different because of the needed ratio change it is not IMO, as good an approach as the higher on firewall air vent location.

There is a 56 Executive done by a friend of his also on the website with different approaches to adding some modern component improvements. http://www.1956packardpanther.com

Posted on: 5/5 7:19:06
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Vacation Car - 56 Patrician
Forum Ambassador
Joined:
2007/4/20 17:54
From Fresno CA
Posts: 15635
Quote:

CarFreak wrote:
thankfully the switch and its entirety were there.

I did find the A/C wiring diagram thankfully.

Where did that bracket for the A/C switch mount too? Mine was just hanging out on the backside of the dash. I didnt find any mention of how that switch mounts behind the dash.


Instructions on mounting the switch are in the book I suggested you download. There should be two screws or at least two holes in the bottom of the defroster channel near the original L defroster duct flange. That duct flange is cut flush and eliminated with AC so there should be some kind of flat plate covering the remaining hole. The switch mounting screws could be part of that plate or helping secure the plate. The switch mounting slots slide over the screws and assy is tightened in place. Switch has a slight offset with the shaft angled toward the dash hole location. A gentle curve of the flex cable will provide the drive connection to the knob.

Attach file:



jpg  control sw mount.jpg (344.86 KB)
209_5eb06444b1dda.jpg 1066X698 px

Posted on: 5/4 11:54:57
_________________
Howard
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top
« 1 2 3 (4) 5 6 7 ... 1507 »




Search
Recent Photos
Random Photo
1953 Cavalier with AC
Helping Out
PackardInfo is supported and funded by user donations. If you would to help out by either donating content, or funds to help with the upkeep and hosting of this site please EMAIL ME or click on the donate button.