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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#21
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Tom Putnam
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archive,

I will investigate.

The following post about B&B is from Cleveland: The Making of a City by William Ganson Rose and Kent State University Press, 1950 p.423.

Turns out my employer's employee parking lot is directly across the street from one of the former B&B buildings. Who knew? Leece-Neville was also located on Hamilton Ave. but to the east of us. Cleveland Twist Drill was located close by on E49th Street.

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Posted on: 2018/12/14 0:05
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#22
Just can't stay away
Just can't stay away

ALLEN B. SIMONS
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12-14-18

Hello puttenham,

Thanks for the research. You may also find some good info about the air conditioning component manufacturing as well as contracting with Packard, GM/Cadillac and Chrysler.

Good luck.

archiveman2977
Allen

Posted on: 2018/12/14 8:53
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#23
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Tom Putnam
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Bishop & Babcock air compressor: Does anyone know the mounting hole dimensions on the bottom feet of the 40-42 air compressor? These dimensions will be helpful. If no one has these dimensions, does anyone have access to part number 25431 which is the engine mounted bracket for the compressor and shown below. Ideally someone could measure the dimension need to my supplied reverse engineering sketch. The pic is taken from U-Tube video:2009 Greenwich Concours d'Elegance - 1940 Packard first car with air conditioning.

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Posted on: 2018/12/22 17:32
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#24
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Packard Don
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In case it helps, here's another photo of the bracket on a 1941 160. You might also be able to buy a copy of the original blueprint as many are available in the Studebaker archives.

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Posted on: 2018/12/22 17:44
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#25
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HH56
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Referring to Don's photo above, I have a bronze reproduction of the 25484 a fellow in Texas did many years ago. The slots center to center on the repro measure 3 1/2" for the short dimension front/back slots and again measuring center to center, I get 6 3/4" for the right/left slots.

As the repro appears to have been cast using an original for the pattern there was some shrinkage in the repro part due to the casting process. Based on the amount I had to enlarge and offset the holes for the head studs to fit I would say the casting shrunk the typical 1-2% of bronze. Adding 1-2% to those measured numbers should provide fairly accurate dimensions for an original part.

Since the only modern compressor easily available for auto use seems to be the round Sanden or Denso configuration which looks so out of place on the old cars, a compressor used in truck refrigeration units might be a possible substitute more in line with the looks of the original compressor. Downside is it does not appear to have a clutch and I don't know if one is available or if a Sanden type clutch could be adapted. Have not researched to see if the compressors are available separately as service items either.

Here is is a photo of a compressor used on a Zanotta refrigeration unit for a semi reefer trailer. This compressor is run by two different motors, 12v on the road and line voltage when in a yard. Even if there is no clutch available the pulley should at least be able to be changed to something more appropriate. If no clutch is available that would require some different means of temp control besides the modern cycling clutch method so maybe a hurdle unless replacing an original constant on compressor and keeping the old valves and controls etc.

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Posted on: 2018/12/22 18:46
Howard
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#26
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Tom Putnam
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PackardDon: thanks for alternate photo and tip on Studebaker resources (gamechanger).

HH56: thanks for correcting PN, approximate dimensions and compressor upgrade work-arounds.

I know what to do next.

Posted on: 2018/12/22 23:15
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#27
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Not too shy to talk

Tom Putnam
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Reviewed microfilm at Cleveland Public Library today re: Bishop & Babcock. No help on compressor CID. Going to Plan B.

Posted on: 2018/12/28 20:10
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#28
Not too shy to talk
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Tom Putnam
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Plan B: Below is a 1927 catalog page describing the B&B line of pulley driven air compressors courtesy of the Smithsonian. Unfortunately the catalog does not contain any dimensions. You can see an illustration showing and electric motor driving a foot mounted horizontally split, vertically arranged air compressor similar to our area of Packard interest. We see 1cyl and 2cyl callouts for the electric motor driven compressor. HH56 told us the slot of the air compressor mounting bracket were 3 1/2" wide by 6 3/4' long with out being too specific. Based on what I see, I am going to GUESS our Packard air pump is no smaller than 2.64in3 based on a 1.625" bore and 2.0" stroke, 2cyl inline config. Stats = STandard ATmosphereS. 20 Stats = 294 psi.

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Posted on: 2018/12/31 23:39
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#29
Not too shy to talk
Not too shy to talk

Tom Putnam
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Plan C is to go to Studebaker/Packard archives in South Bend to get the air compressor drawing which I will leave to others.

Source:

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Posted on: 2018/12/31 23:41
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Re: 1940-1941-1942 PACKARD AC COMPRESSOR C.I.D.
#30
Just can't stay away
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ALLEN B. SIMONS
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1-1-19

Hello puttenham,

First, Happy New Year.

Thanks for your research. I would never have considered to search the Smithsonian. Your estimation of 2.64-cid rings truer than a SWAG-scientific wild ass guess-, but, of course, your closest reference is a 1927 publication, rather than a 1939 one.

Along with the question of the air conditioning compressor cid, do you or anyone else know the CFM-cubic feet per minute- of the air conditioning blower? I haven't been able to find this information in the three 1941 air conditioning owner/service manuals; respectively, 1941 Packard, 1941 Cadillac and 1941 Chrysler.

Thanks again. It's always a feeling of accomplishment to uncover long lost information.

archiveman2977
Allen

Posted on: 2019/1/1 11:48
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